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Full text of "Annual Report of the Department of Public Welfare. Massachusetts. 1922-28"

u 



r^ 



iblic Document 



No. 



®l)e (EomtnotitoeoUl) of itla00acl)U0etta 



ANNUAL EEPORT 



DEPARTMENT 



Public Welfare 



Year ending November 30, 1922 




ublic Document No. 17 



®1)C CommontocaUl) of ilTa0sacl)U0ett0 



ANNUAL REPORT 



7}u^. ; DEPARTMENT 



Public Welfare 



Year ending November 30, 1922 




Publication of this Document 

approved by the 

^ . Commission on Administration and Finance 

\ 



^IftltL 



STATE HOUSE. BOSTON 



CONTENTS 



The Advisory' Board of the Department 

Report of the Commissioner .... 

Division of Aid and ReUef .... 

Division of Child Guardianship 

Division of Juvenile Training .... 

Division of Housing and Town Planning . 

The State Infirmary, Tewksbury 

Almshouse Department at the State Farm, Bridgewat 

Lyman School for Boys, Westborough 

Industrial School for Boys, Shirley . 

State Industrial School for Girls, Lancaster 

Massachusetts Hospital School, Canton 

Supei vision of Institutions .... 

The County Training Schools .... 

Super^ision of the Settled Poor Relieved or Supported by Cities and Towns 
Laws Afifecting the Department, Passed by the Legislature of 1922 
The Department's Finances . . . . . . 

Private Charitable Corporations ...... 

The City and Town Almshouses . . 

Statistics of Poor Relief ........ 



PAGE 

. 3 
4 
7 

. 15 

. 32 

. 33 

. 37 

. 38 

. 38 

. 40 

. 41 

. 42 

. 43 

. 51 

. 53 

. 55 

. 59. 

. 63 

. 112 

. 119 



36/M3 



THE ADVISORY BOARD OF THE DEPARTMENT. 

Ex officio, RICHARD K. CONANT, Commissioner. 

Hon. a. C. RATSHESKY, Boston, Chairman 
Mr. JEFFREY R. BRACKETT, Boston . 
Mr. GEORGE CROMPTON, Worcester . 
Mr. GEORGE H. McCLEAN, Springfield 
Mrs. ADA ELIOT SHEFFIELD, Boston 
Mrs. MARY P. H. SHERBURNE, Brookline 



Term 
expires 
1925 
1925 
1924 
1924 
1923 
1923 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P.[D. 17. 



Part I 



EEPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC WELFARE. 



To the Honorable Senate and Hoiise of Representatives. 

The Third Annual Report of the Department of Pubhc Welfare covering the 
year from December 1, 1921, to November 30, 1922, is herewith respectfully pre- 
sented. 

This report is the fifty-ninth consecutive annual report of the activities of the 
state department established in 1863 as the Board of State Charities, reorganized 
in 1879 as the State Board of Health, Lunacy and Charity, in 1886 as the State 
Board of Lunacy and Charity, in 1898 as the State Board of Charity, and in 1919 
as the Department of Public Welfare. 

The tendency to change the name of such boards from ^^charit}''" to ''public 
welfare" has now become nation-wide and reflects a new emphasis which has come 
to be placed upon the preventive phases of social work. Charity has long ceased 
to be merely the sympathetic alleviation of distress. Modern standards of social 
work demand that constructive and preventive activities be emphasized in a way 
which will as far as possible promote the public welfare. To give aid or to care for 
children in a way which preserves independence of spirit, which saves the morale of 
the family from pauperism and encourages every possible effort toward self-sup- 
port; to prevent in each family, as far as may be, further poverty, further neglect 
of children, and further delinquency; to help eliminate drunkenness, feeble-minded- 
ness, vice, and other causes of poverty, — these are the aims of the Department. 
They are efforts for the public welfare. 

The Department of Public Welfare has charge of all the neglected, all the de- 
linquent, and all the dependent persons over whom the Commonwealth takes 
supervision except those for whom the state has set up specialized departments. 

As nearty as can be estimated, with a possibility of some duphcation, over 84,000 
persons have come under our supervision during the year. These cases are sum- 
marized as follows : 



1. In the State Infirmary, the Massachusetts Hospital School, and the three train- 

ing schools ..... 

2. On parole from the three training schools 

3. Minor wards, principally in foster homes 

4. Infants in boarding homes supervised 

5. Individuals aided in mothers' aid families 

6. Individuals given temporary aid . 

7. Individuals given sick aid 

8. Individuals aided because of dangerous diseases 

9. Individuals aided because of wife settlement . 

10. Women and babies from the State Infirmary under supervision 

11. Children placed out by cities and towns and supervised 

12. Adults placed out by cities and tow^ns and supervised 

13. Inmates of almshouses supervised 



7,274 
4,414 
7,049 
2,348 
17,708 
28,951 
6,326 
2,462 
2,.328 

358 
1,037 

240 
3,795 

84,290 



The Department is organized in three divisions, the Divisions of Aid and Relief, 
Child Guardianship, and Juvenile Training; and two other subdivisions, Private 
Charities and Housing and Town Planning. Each of the three main divisions 
includes an institution or institutions as an integral part of its work. 



Part I.] 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER. 



DIVISION OF AID AND RELIEF. 

In May, 1922, unemployment ceased to be an abnormal factor in applications 
for relief and the unemployment period which began in November, 1920, came to 
an end. The effects of such a period of unemployment are disastrous (our report 
for 1921 shows its effect throughout all the divisions of the Department), and yet 
when prosperity returns few people give any thought to the prevention of another 
such crisis or to the mitigation of its severity. It should be remembered in con- 
nection with such a period that applications for temporary aid (aid given to persons 
who have no legal settlement) increased over 250% in one 3^ear, — from 3,223 
cases involving 13,313 persons in 1920 to 8,093 cases involving 32,372 persons in 
1921. The cost to the state of such a period can only be estimated. The table 
on page 9 shows only a portion of the expense of temporary aid because bills 
from cities and towns for reimbursement for such aid given during the unem- 
ployment period continued to be presented during 1922. It is difficult to separate 
the cost of unemployment in the other forms of aid for which state reimbursement 
is made, but the expense is known to be large. An estimate of the increased cost 
to cities and towns of aid given by them to persons with legal settlement, for which 
no reimbursement is made by the state, can be obtained from the table on page 
133 in comparison with the same table for previous years. The total net cost of 
public poor relief, as given in that table for the year ending March 31, 1922, is 
$2,300,000 more than the cost for the year ending March 31, 1920. And 3'et with 
all this direct expense, the greatest expense is in the weakened morale of the 
people who are forced into dependency. 

The Mothers' Aid Law was amended during the year by extending its age limit 
for dependent children from 14 years to 16 years in cases where such children are 
required to attend school. 

At the State Infirmary, the hospital of the Division of Aid and Relief, seven 
new hospital wards have been built during the year and additional quarters have 
been erected for employees. The program of building development ought to be 
continued in 1923 so that the hospital may have ample faciUties for treating aU 
the classes of sick persons who come under its care. Persons sent to the Infirmary 
because of the drug habit have been removed to a special ward at the State Farm 
at Bridge water to which all future commitments will be made. 

DIVISION OF CHILD GUARDIANSHIP. 

The number of wards under the care of the Division shows a reduction from 
6,216 at the end of 1921 to 6,127 at the end of 1922. As the following table shows, 
the increase in the number of such children was continuous and considerable up to 
1920. This was undoubtedly due to the strengthening of public opinion against 
the neglect of children, to the enactment of laws requiring boarding houses for 
infants and lying-in hospitals to be licensed, and to the extension of state care for 
dependent children. It seems probable that the peak has been reached in the effect 
of these causes. 

State Minor Wards under the Care of the Department at the End of the Official Year. 



Year 


Total 


Delinquent 


Neglected 


Dependent 


1885 


903 


289 


106 


508 


1890 
















1,065 


276 


349 


340 


1895 
















1,636 


325 


640 


671 


1900 
















'2,476 


371 


1,119 


986 


1905 
















3.197 


273 


1.741 


1.183 


1910 
















4,740 


319 


2,541 


1.880 


1915 
















5,942 


371 


3.183 


2.384 


1920 
















6,316 


284 


3.312 


2,720 


1921 
















6,216 


251 


3.177 


2,788 


1922 












6,127 


289 


3.089 


2,749 



6 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 

If it is possible for the community to maintain the rate of progress which it has 
been making during the past decade in the prevention of disease, in the restriction 
of undesirable immigration, in the reduction of drunkenness and in improving the 
standard of living, there ought to come an even more marked diminution in the 
number of dependent, neglected, and delinquent children who are committed to 
our care. 

The great change in the work of the Division of Child Guardianship this year 
has been in the care of that small proportion of its charges who, because of feeble- 
mindedness or sickness, must be sent to institutions. A new hospital, the Brad- 
ford Infirmary, with one hundred beds, erected at the Massachusetts Hospital 
School at Canton, was dedicated on October 16, 1922. It makes two important 
contributions to progress. In form the building is a great achievement in the field 
of architecture, embodying in brick, as it does, the ideal systems of ventilation and 
lighting which Dr. John E. Fish, the superintendent, has developed in the wooden 
buildings at the institution. In use the building takes us a long step forward in the 
care of children. Hitherto we have had to send our sick minor wards to private 
hospitals which are more expensive and much less satisfactory than the new one, 
or we have had to send them to our hospital for adults, the State Infirmary, where 
cliildren could not be properly isolated. The Trustees of the Hospital School have 
in their fifteen years of service demonstrated new methods of rebuilding crippled 
children so that they can become to a large degree self-supporting. This new hos- 
pital \\dll provide similar splendid facilities for the sick children who are under our 
care. 

The opening of the third school for the feeble-minded at Belchertown has made 
it possible to begin to transfer from the State Infirmary to the schools for the feeble- 
minded those minor wards who for a long time have been awaiting admission to 
the schools. With the sick children going to Canton and the facilities for the feeble- 
minded children so greatly improved, a great advance has been made this year in 
the care of children who need institutional treatment. 

DIVISION OF JUVENILE TRAINING. 

We are glad to be able to report that the improvement in the industrial situation 
has helped decrease juvenile delinquency. At each of the three training schools 
there was during the j^ear a decrease in the daily average number of children. The 
total decrease was from 1,058 in 1921 to 1,011 in 1922. Such a decrease usually 
follows an improvement in industrial conditions. 

At the Lyman School for Boys a new central kitchen and storehouse has been 
constructed. The excavating, plumbing, steam-fitting, grading and electric wiring 
were done by the boys under the supervision of competent officers. 

At the Industrial School for Boys the central kitchen and laundry building which 
the Legislature authorized in 1921 was completed and placed in service in July. 
It has added much to the efficiency of the school. Steam from this building is 
used to heat three others, bringing about a great saving in fuel. The new infirmary 
authorized by the Legislature of 1922 was nearly completed at the close of the fiscal 
year. 

At the Industrial School for Girls, two cottages were connected with the central 
heating plant. New steam heating systems were installed in four other cottages 
and a new barn was constructed at the Bolton branch. 

PRIVATE CHARITIES. 

By order of the Commission on Administration and Finance, Part II of this 
report has this year been condensed to a table giving the essential figures from the 
returns b}^ private charitable corporations. 

HOUSING AND TOWN PLANNING. 
Nine new planning boards have been appointed by cities and towns during the 
year, making a total of fifty-five active planning boards in Massachusetts, Town 
planning is a preventive measure which is succeeding. The greatest activity of 



Part I.] 



DIVISION OF AID AND RELIEF. 



the year has been in the matter of zoning. Since the passage of the zoning enabling 
act in October, 1920, one city and three towTis have enacted zoning ordinances, and 
twenty other cities and towns are studjang zoning. 

GENERAL. 

During the year a new Manual of Laws relating to the work of the Department 
has been pubhshed, the pre\ious edition of 1915 having become obsolete and un- 
usable. 

The Ad\isory Board which has a veto power over the policies of the Department 
continues to render interested and effective service and exercises a wholesome 
supervision over the acts of the Commissioner. 

The creation by the Legislature of 1922 of a new state Commission on Admini- 
stration and Finance with a budget commissioner, a comptroller, a state purchasing 
agent, and a commissioner of personnel and standardization, will undoubtedly 
result in further economies for the benefit of the tax payer. 

Massachusetts is far sighted in public welfare work and has seen that the greatest 
economy comes from attempting to treat social conditions fundamentally, — to 
be thorough in case work so as to encourage individual effort, to be vigorous in 
preventive measures so as to reduce the causes of dependency, and to be wise in 
constructive work so as to build up the health, intelligence, and stamina of the 
children, the famil}^ and the community. 

RICHARD K. CONANT, 

Commissioner. 

DIVISION OF AID AND RELIEF. 

FiL\XK W. Goodhue, Director. 
Subdivision of Settlements. 

Edw^ard F. Morgan, Supervisor. 

The subdivision of settlements investigates the legal settlement of all persons 
officially called to the attention of the division bj'' overseers of the poor and boards 
of health; investigates the settlement of patients admitted to the State Infirmary, 
State Farm (almshouse department). State sanatoria and the Massachusetts Hos- 
pital school; and supervises public relief rendered in homes and in hospitals by 
cities and towns to persons without legal settlement. The subdi\dsion also dis- 
charges male inmates of the State. Infirmary and State Farm (almshouse depart- 
ment) and visits poor persons supported by cities and towns in families. 

The following table is a summary of the w^ork done during the year in the ex- 
amination and investigation of settlements of inmates of the State institutions: — 









t3 




g 


-a 




.2 


-a 


C 
3 

i 


s 


2 


S£ 


Institutions 


^ 


S 


0) 


o 


^ 






c 




B 






u 




s 


S3 


9> 


M 

^ 










5 


1 


i 


1 


g 


State Infirmary 


2,625 


630 


420 


155 


28 


603 


State Farm 






344 


176 


126 


25 


8 


159 


Lakeville State Sanatorium . 






310 


186 


170 


26 




196 


North Ileiiding State Sanatorium 






233 


179 


164 


19 


_ 


183 


Rutland State Sanatorium . 






331 


283 


263 


31 


_ 


294 


West field State Sanatorium . 






262 


219 


209 


26 


_ 


235 


Massachusetts Hospital School 






50 


50 


45 


13 


- 


58 


Totals 






4,155 


1,723 


1,397 


295 


36 


1,728 



Cases pending November 30, 1921, 571. 
Cases pending November 30, 1922, 566. 



8 DEPARTMENT OE PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 

Superrision of Wayfarers' Lodges and Pvblic Lodging Houses. — Under tlie pro- 
visions of General Laws, chapter 121, sections 7, 20, and 21, the Department annu- 
ally inspects wa^-farers' lodges and public lodging houses where the charge is twenty- 
five cents jx^r night or less, and where ten or more beds are pro\ided. 

There are but two Alunicipal lodging houses or wayfarers' lodges in the State. 
These are maintained by the cities of Boston and Springfield and both are under 
the control of the overseers of the poor or the local public welfare board. In both 
cases a woodyard is conducted. Of these two institutions it can be said that they 
set a good standard for comparison. 

The falling off in numbers, mentioned last year and the year before, as evinced 
in the connnercial houses, seems to have finally reached the minimum. We estimate 
this decrease to be one-third or one-fourth of the capacity of the houses, many of 
them having closed one or two floors. This has resulted in many cases in one 
desirable feature, — the abandonment for present needs of the double deck bed. 
While a few houses were noted last year as carrying a minimum charge of twenty 
cents, this year the universal charge in the houses of commercial type is twenty- 
five cents. Some of the semi-charitable houses have passed from the inspection of 
the Department through increase in charges. 

Temporary Aid {G. L., ch. 117, sect. IS). — Cities and towns are authorized by 
statute to furnish adequate assistance to poor persons ha\ang no la^v-ful settlements, 
if so ordered bj' the Department of Public W^elfare. 

On December 1, 1921, there were 1,987 continued cases, and during the year 
4,485 notices were received from 215 cities and towns concerning 20,183 persons. 

Causes of Aid, 1922. 



Illness . 


. 947 


Husband in House of Correction 


. 134 


Desertion 


. 2915 


Orphans .... 


16 


Widowhood . 


136 


Insanity .... 


16 


Old age . 


37 


Blindness .... 


3 


Unemployment 


. 1,890 


Non-support ... 


17 


Insufficient income . 


987 


Miscellaneous 


7 



4,485 

Improved industrial conditions are clear] j^ shown by a reduction from last year's 
figures of 44% in the number of new notices received where the application was 
due to unemploj^ment or an insufficient family income. At the close of the year 
there were very few cases of unemplojanent. 

The nmiiber of cases of desertion and non-support, although they represent only 
7% of the new cases received, are a difficult and costlj^ problem. A tabulation 
made in November, '1922, of the number of active temporary aid cases of this 
class disclosed 229 eases wherein the families were recei\dng aid at the expense of 
this department, amounting to $2,110 weekly. While the general results of the 
probation service are gratifj-ing, there is need of great-er co-operation between re- 
lief agencies and the courts in cases where public aid is necessary. The practice 
of the courts is not uniform. In some jurisdictions no warrant issues unless the 
definite address of the husband can be furnished. In some instances district at- 
torneys are unwilling to institute extradition proceedings because of the expense 
to the county which is involved. They do not seem to reahze that if no extradition 
proceedings are undertaken public funds are expended through other agencies for 
the support of the families. An examination of desertion and non-support cases 
compels a finding that the majority of the courts should be urged to be much more 
severe in the matter of disposition, especially as to continuing offenders. It would 
seem as though some drastic action were necessary to discourage cases of this class. 
Up to the present time it does not appear that suspended sentences and probation 
have accomplished this result. 

The amounts annually appropriated by the Legislature are necessarily for cur- 
rent and previous years. The following tabulation shows the actual amounts 
reimbursed for aid rendered by cities and towns during the years designated : — 



Part I. 



DIVISION OF AID AND RELIEF. 



Year 


^^^^^ Families 


Amounts 
reimbursed 


1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 




2.847 
3.131 
4.848 
7.305 
5.165 
5.664 
4.358 
3.756 
3.223 
8.093 


12.339 
13,434 
20,714 
32,056 
21,043 
22,258 
17,701 
15,668 
13.313 
32,372 


$48,192 85 
63.203 05 
108.337 29 
178.611 62 
159.205 .53 
224.833 77 


1918 
1919 
1920 
1921 




259.468 94 
306.886 55 
323,778 84 
566,252 27 



The amount reimbursed for aid rendered in 1922 ($153,501.43) is not included 
in the above tabulation as the claims for the last six months of the year are not 
received until after the close of the fiscal year, as pro\aded by Chapter 122, Sec- 
tion 19, General Laws. 

Shipwrecked Seamen {G. L., ch. 102, sect. 5). — During the year only two notices 
were received, one from Chatham, the other from Nantucket. 

Sick State Poor (G. L., ch. 122, sects. 17, IS). — The sick law provides that no 
person shall be sent to the State Infirmary whose health would be endangered by 
removal. On account of lack of facilities for caring for minors at the State In- 
firmary the department has not insisted upon their removal to the institution, 
believing that the removal would in most cases endanger their health. 

Cities and to\\Tis are reimbursed for the support of persons having no legal set- 
tlement who are ill in their homes or in public or privately controlled hospitals, 
infirmaries, or institutions for the deaf, dumb, or blind, pro\ided such persons are 
not in suitable condition for removal to the State Infirmary when applying for 
assistance. 

On December 1, 1921, there were 188 continued cases, and during the year 6,138 
notices were received from 112 cities and towns concerning 6,138 persons repre- 
sented as too ill to be removed. 

Dangerous Diseases {G. L., ch. Ill, sect. 116). — The law pro\4des that a board of 
health shall retain charge, to the exclusion of the overseers of the poor, of any 
person ill with a disease defined by the Department of Public Health as dangerous 
to the public health. 

If any member of a family is ill with a disease declared dangerous to the public 
health, the aid required by the other members of the familj' is furnished by the 
overseers of the poor, unless the family is quarantined as pi ^^-^ded in chapter 111, 
section 95, General Laws, in which event the board of health furnishes all aid re- 
quired. 

On December 1, 1921, there were 320 continued cases, and during the year 2,142 
notices were received from boards of health of 92 cities and towns concerning 2,142 
persons. 

Wife-settlement (G. L., ch. 122, sect. 12). — The law provides that "If a state 
pauper has a wife who is also a pauper having a legal settlement in the common- 
wealth he shall be supported by the town where his wife has her settlement." 

On December 1, 1921, there were 144 continued cases, and during the year 366 
notices were received from 50 cities and towns concerning 1,680 persons. 

Burials {G. L., ch. 117, sect. 17). — The number of burial claims received during 
the year was 292 from 56 cities and towns. Reimbursement was a])proved in 260 
of these claims, the lowest number chargeable to the commonwealth in any fiscal 
year during the last twenty-five years. 

Audit. — Tlie number, amount, and allowance of the bills examined on account 
of cases of temporary aid, sick state poor, dangerous diseases, wife-settlement, 
burial, and mothers with dependent children are shown in the following tabula- 
tion. It is to be noted that the total shown in this table may vary somewhat from 



10 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 



the total paid out of the Treasury during the fiscal year from the appropriation in 
question. This possible variance arises from the fact that bills audited by this 
Department are in some cases not actually paid during the year for which the audit 
is shown. For actual expenditures from these respective appropriations see pages 
59-62. 



Classes of Cases 


Bills 


Claims 


Allowances 


Deductions 


Temporary aid 

Sick State poor 

Dangerous disesises 

Wife-settlement 

Hurials ......... 

Mothers with dependent children 


5,608 
3,386 
1,444 
371 
260 
5,964 


$612,016 48 

90,356 40 

115,748 57 

11,501 78 

5,301 15 

863,432 35 


$574,999 73 
69,331 74 
99,998 10 
10,664 59 
4,499 50 
819,999 48 


$37,016 75 

21,021 66 

15,750 47 

837 19 

801 65 

13,432 87 




17,033 


$1,698,356 73 


$1,609,496 14 


$88,860 59 



Removals. — The Department is charged with the duty of removing sane paupers 
to cities and to\\Tis within the State, or, when not belonging in Massachusetts, to 
the State or place where they belong. The following table shows the removals 
made during the year: — 





1920 


1921 


1922 


To other countries 

To other States 

To town of residence 


104 
155 
857 


134 

262 
1,254 


135 

198 

1,648 




1,116 


1,650 


1,981 



Subdivision of Mothers' Aid. 
Mrs. Elizabeth F. Moloney, Supervisor. 

The Massachusetts Mothers' Aid Law provides weekly cash grants of sufficient 
amounts to enable a fit and needy mother to bring up her dependent children 
properly in her own home. The aid rendered is not in the nature of a pension. It 
is relief which is granted only when the public relief officers are satisfied, after 
diligent inquiry into all proper sources of support for the family, that there is need 
of aid from public funds. 

It is not only necessary to estimate the expenses of a given family but also the 
net weekly income of the family from all available sources. Income from funds, 
such as Workmen's Compensation, from relatives and societies, from rentals, from 
part tir;ie work of the mother and from the net earnings of the children of working 
age sh" uld be included. Such comparisons of income and expenses should be made 
frequently in order that the aid may be adjusted to the changing needs of the 
family. The aid should be increased in times of special need due to sickness, and 
it should be reduced when the income of the familj^ increases. It should be with- 
drawn altogether as soon as the family becomes self-supporting. 

Good case work demands attention to the health of the families aided. A 
thorough phj^sical examination of the mother and of all of the children as soon as 
the mother applies for Mothers' Aid is recommended, as a result of which the 
health needs of the family may be discovered and attended to. This is especially 
important in cases where the father has died of tuberculosis or if he is, known to be 
suffering from general paresis due to venereal disease. Indeed in such cases it is 
absolutely necessary to have all the members of the family examined. 

A simple operation for the removal of adenoids and tonsils may mean improved 



Parti.] DIVISION OF AID AND RELIEF. 11 

health and more rapid advancement in school for a backward child. A quart of 
milk allowed a delicate child each day may mean health and even life itself. 

With all of our present day opportunities for hospital and nursing care, our free 
dental clinics and our health centers, there is no excuse for neglecting the health 
of children. 

Tuberculosis was the cause of death of many fathers of families receiving Mothers' 
Aid. Tuberculosis was the cause of the incapacity of 102 out of 162 fathers suffer- 
ing from chronic illness whose families were added to our Mothers' Aid list during 
the past year. 

While most of the tubercular fathers are cared for in state, county, or municipal 
sanatoria there are some tubercular fathers who refuse to remain in hospitals, and 
some others who have been discharged from sanatoria as ''quiescent cases." These 
tubercular men are living at home, either too sick to work, or, if able to do light 
work, unable to get suitable work to do. The support of these tubercular men is 
an added expense under the Mothers' Aid Law. If a man is a menace to the health 
of his family he should be made to go to a hospital before Mothers' Aid is granted 
his family. In some cases the mother and her dependent children have been ex- 
posed to tuberculosis during the lingering illness of the father at home. It is of the 
greatest importance to have such a mother and all of the children examined for 
tuberculosis and placed under the supervision of the Board of Health. Overwork, 
imdernourishment, and crowded and unsanitary housing conditions probably 
caused the father's illness and if the children are to be saved, these conditions must 
be remedied as far as possible. . 

Statistics. 

At the beginning of the fiscal year (on December 1, 1921) there were 3,407 
mothers with 10,555 dependent children under fourteen years of age receiving 
Mothers' Aid. 

During the year 877 new cases were added and 913 cases were closed, so that 
there were 3,371 mothers in receipt of Mothers' Aid at the close of the fiscal year 
(November 30, 1922). 

On December 1, 1921, the 3,407 mothers with 10,555 dependent children were 
classified as follows : — 

A. Classified as to legal settlement: 

1. Without legal settlement: 

570 mothers with 1,648 dependent children. 

2. With a legal settlement : 

2,837 mothers with 8,907 dependent children. 

B, Classified as to widowhood: 

1. Widows: 

2,830 mothers with 8,795 dependent children. 

2. Not widows: 

577 mothers with 1,760 dependent children. 

Note. — The living husbands of the 577 mothers were classified as 
follows : — 
318 were totally incapacitated (98 were insane, 220 had ^-hronic 
illness; of the latter, 143 had tuberculosis and 77*^bther 
than tuberculosis). 
215 were deserting husbands. 
20 were divorced or legally separated. 
24 were in jail. 

The new cases that were received during the fiscal year mcluded 877 mothers 
with 2,869 dependent children, and were classified as follows: — 

A. Classified as to legal settlement: 

1. Without legal settlement: 

131 mothers with 421 dependent children. 

2. With a legal settlement : 

746 mothers with 2,448 dependent children. 



12 



DEPARTMEST of public welfare. [P. D. 17. 



H. Chissified as to widowhood: 

1. Widows: 

576 mothers with 1,873 dependent children. 

2. Not widows: 

301 mothers with 996 dependent children. 

Note. — The living husbands of the 301 mothers were classified as 
follows : — 
197 were totally incapacitated (35 were insane, 162 had chronic 
illness; of the latter, 102 had tuberculosis and 60 other 
than tuberculosis). 
71 were deserting husbands. 

8 were divorced or legally separated. 
25 were in jail. 

Causes of Depexdexcy. 

The death of the father was the chief cause of dependency. More than 4 out of 
every 5 mothers were widows. 

Chronic illness of the father, desertion, and insanity w^ere the three other prin- 
cipal causes of dependency in Mothers' Aid families. 

Desertion is a primary cause of dependency. Two hundred fifteen out of 577 
living fathers deserted and failed to support their wives and their dependent 
children. 

If we were to grant adequate aid for his family the moment a deserting husband 
chose to evade his responsibility and transfer it to the taxpayers' shoulders, we 
would be encouraging desertion on the part of certain irresponsible fathers. In 
order to prevent this, we stipulate that one yesir must elapse after the date of the 
father's desertion before the family is eligible to Mothers' Aid. 

The Overseers of the Poor are often lax in the prosecution of deserting husbands 
and District Attorneys are apparently slow to put their respective counties to the 
expense of seeking out and extraditing these fugitives from justice. As a result 
irresponsible fathers desert their families ^^^th impunity and the taxpayers are 
forced to bear the heaw burden of their support. 



Causes for closing Mothers' Aid Cases. 



Sufficient income .... 

Applicant remarried 

Family moved .... 

Husband resumed support of family 

Non-conformitj' 'W'ith policies 

Youngest child 14 years of age 

Unfitness of mother 

Transferred to other sources of relief 

Applicant died 

Application withdrawn 

Disbandment of home 

Applicant in hospital 

One dependent child 

Unsuitable housing 

Miscellaneous 



Less than 1 year . 
Less than 2 years . 
Less than 3 years . 
Less than 4 years . 
Less than 5 years . 
Less than 6 years . 
Less than 7 years . 
Less than 8 years . 
Less than 9 years . 
Nine yesivs . 



360 

113 

92 

80 

80 

45 

43 

22 

17 

16 

13 

9 

8 

6 

9 

913 



Duration of Mothers' Aid Cases closed between December 1, 1921, and November 30, 1922. 



292 

143 

96 

130 

54 

73 

34 

43 

40 

8 



913 



Partl.l DIVISION OF AID AND RELIEF. 13 



Amendment to the Mothers' Aid Law. 

Chapter 376, Acts of 1922, which became effective August 1, 1922, extends the 
provisions of the Mothers' Aid Law so as to include — 

A. Children between the ages of 14-16 years who have not completed the equivalent 

of the sixth grade of school. 

B. Children between the ages of 14-16 years who are unable to obtain an employ- 

ment certificate. 

Mothers' Aid Appropriation by the Massachusetts Legislature. 
(For reimbursement purposes.) 

Sept. 1, 1913, to Nov. 30, 1914, State appropriation of $175,000 

Dec. 1, 1914, to Nov. 30, 1915, State appropriation of 250,000 

Dec. 1, 1915, to Nov. 30, 1916, State appropriation of 300,000 

Dec. 1, 1916, to Nov. 30, 1917, State appropriation of 400,000 

Dec. 1, 1917, to Nov. 30, 1918, State appropriation of 475,000 

Dec. 1, 1918, to Nov. 30, 1919, State appropriation of 550,000 

Dec. 1, 1919, to Nov. 30, 1920, State appropriation of 700,000 

Dec. 1, 1920, to Nov. 30, 1921, State appropriation of 900,000 

Dec. 1, 1921, to Nov. 30, 1922, 5to^e appropriation of . . . . . 850,000 

Subdivision of Social Service. 

Miss Flora E. Burton, Supervisor. 

Seven hundred eighty-one women and children were admitted to the State 
Infirmary during the year, including 165 who were wards of the Division of Child 
Guardianship, Industrial School for Girls, Lyman School for Boj's, and Reforma- 
tory for Women. There were 121 births. 

The total number discharged was 725, including 141 who were discharged 
directly to the above named guardians. 

Women with Children. — The number of admissions for confinement care and 
after care remains about the same from year to year. The statistics of ages, na- 
tionality and employment change only slightly. The tj^pe of woman or girl, how- 
ever, seems to be inferior on account of a definite character weakness which is 
yet no; "seble-mindedness. 

For many years it has been urged that first offenders be sent elsewhere than to 
the State Infirmary unless committable as feeble-minded or badly diseased, because 
the State Infirmary is not a suitable environment for first offenders. Yet this 
year 45 were admitted for their first illegitimate confinement, and 31 mothers 
with their first illegitimate babies were admitted for convalescence. Overseers of 
the poor and private social workers should realize that it is uneconomical, unsocial 
and uncharitable to send any girl to the Infirmary who has no other sign of syphilis 
than a positive blood reaction' to the Wassermann test. 

At present there are at the State Infirmary 36 women who have each had one 
illegitimate child or more, and who are committable as feeble-minded. These are 
an accumulation of ten years; some have grown old waiting to be sent to a State 
school. They and their relatives have been promised that they should go to a suit- 
able institution, but their applications, some on file for six and eight years, are 
repeatedly turned down because the schools are overcrowded. 

Aged Women. — The diseases most noticeable among the women and girls ad- 
mitted are syphilis, gonorrhea, tuberculosis and a fourth would be cancer which is 
attacking many middle aged women. When the new wards, now being built, are 
completed, the patients with venereal disease will be properly isolated. The adult 
tubercular cases which come to the Infirmary are too far advanced for nuich help, 
— many remain indefinitely and few recover. The same may be said of the cancer 
patients, but in these cases as the disease is not infectious, arrangements can often 
be made for the patients' return to their homes where they are far happier through 
'' the long months of waiting and suffering. 

The aged women will always come to the State Infirmary, and it is well that there 
is one place where they can find the door always open, but an increasing number of 



14 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 



the liopelessly infirm are being admitted, and the wards are becoming overcrowded 
with cripples who can never be discharged. The town farms, not realizing how 
crowded the wards are, have sent several of their disagreeable old people to the 
Infirmary on the theory that it is easier for the Infirmary to care for them. It is 
better for old })eople to be cared for in small units than in large wards. It is hoped 
that the senile dementia patients may be transferred to the insane ward. 

Children. — This subdivision has the care of those children at the State In- 
firmary who are not State wards. It is diflicult to impress upon the relatives of 
children having venereal diseases the necessity for attendance at the out-patient 
clinics maintained by the State. A lack of understanding on the part of the over- 
seers of the poor and local boards of health is frequentl}^ exemplified in the un- 
necessary commitment of non-infectious congenital syphilitic babies who could 
properly be treated in out-patient clinics. 

Much constructiv^e work has been done with the tubercular children. Fourteen 
were admitted, varying in age from 2 months to 16 years and eleven were dis- 
charged to relatives, notifications having been sent to boards of health and follow- 
up visits made where possible. The absolute necessity for proper living condi- 
tions has made it impossible in many cases to return the tubercular child to the 
immediate family. Consequently, four children have been placed with the Division 
of Child Guardianship, and one has been boarded by the father in a private home 
recommended by the worker. It is encouraging to note that many long-standing 
cases have responded to treatment and have been discharged. 

The doctors and workers do not feel that children suffering from chorea should 
be sent to the Infirmary except in cases where they are entirely helpless. 

The babies of insane mothers present a difficult problem. Ten were born at 
the Infirmary. Of these one was committed to the Division of Child Guardianship, 
four were discharged to relatives after proper investigation; one was taken by the 
Department of Mental Diseases; three died, and one was discharged to the City 
of Boston, the place of settlement. 

Discharges and Follow-up Work. — This j'ear 45 mothers with their babies have 
been placed out from the Infirmary and given the supervision of our workers. 
To return the girls to their own homes would be an easy method of disposing of 
our immediate problem of placement. However, because constructive super- 
vision in the girl's own home is nearly impossible and because the unmarried 
mother usually does much better away from her old companions, our policy is 
to place the mothers at employment in a new environment. 

One thousand and twelve persons were assisted by this subdivision during the 
year. With only five visitors available for this work it is evident that the greatest 
need of the division is for a larger staff so that the standard of work may be kept high. 

Women and Children admitted to the State Infirmary during year ending November 30, 

1922. 



Sources from which received: 

Overseers of the poor and Division 

of Aid and Relief . . .598 

Board of Health . .11 

Di\nsion of Child Guardianship 118 

Lyman School for Boys ... 5 

Industrial School for Girls . . 29 

Department of Correction . 1 

Massachusetts School for the Feeble- 
minded, Waverley ... 3 
Wrentham State School ... 3 
Reformatory for Women . . 13 



Ages of admissioiis: 
Children under 3 
Children 3 to 15 
Children 15 to 21 
Patients over 21 



781 

113 
139 
162 
367 



Diseases of admissions: 
Miscellaneous diseases 
Pregnancy 
Convalescence 
Syphilis 

Congenital syphilis 
Gonorrhea 
Tuberculosis 
Morphinism . 
Scabies 
Blind . 
Arteriosclerosis 
Mental 

Feeble-mindedness 
Idiocy . 
Infancy 
No disease 



198 

121 

19 

38 

11 

24 

52 

9 

11 

1 

67 

20 

27 

7 

31 

145 



781 



781 

Births (114 illegitimate), 
Deaths, 156 



121 



Part LI 



DIVISION OF CHILD GUARDIANSHIP. 



15 



Discharges to — 

Place of settlement (5 children) 
Division of Child Guardianship 
Girls' Parole Branch (16 women with 

11 children) 
Board of health 
Reformatory for Women (8 won 

with 7 children) . 
Court (2 children) . 
Massachusetts School for the Feeble- 

Minded .... 
Wrentham State School . 
Insane ward (commitments) . 
Private agencies 



43 
99 

27 
3 

15 

8 

4 

4 

10 

9 



Other States .... 

Other countries 

United States Immigration Commis 

sioner (3 children) 
Relatives .... 
Friends .... 

Husbands (29 women with 10 chil 

dren) .... 

Employment 

Employment with child (45 children 
Parents .... 

Absconded .... 

Total .... 



12 

4 

13 

154 

22 

39 
47 
90 
47 
75 



r25 



Summary of Placem,ent Work. 



?rsons under active supervision 






Follow-up A-isits 


November 30, 1922 




358 


Investigations . 


119 mothers at serN-ice with 120 






Marriages 


babies .... 


239 




Thirty-nine sa\n 


Mothers boarding babies 


45 




totaling 


Girls and children under super- 








vision . . . .• 


64 






Girls in institutions temporarily 


10 







. 1,060 
. 255 

18 
girls 
$1,955 07 



General Summary. 
Women and children admitted to the State Infirmary 
Births at the State Infirmarj^ ....... 

Women and children discharged from the State Infirmary 

Deaths at the State Infirmary ....... 

Women and children discharged by the Social Ser\4ce Division 
Applications at office ......... 

Persons under supervision November 30, 1922, including babies 

Total number assisted by Subdivision of Social Service during 
November 30, 1922 



ear ending 



781 
121 
725 
156 

584 

70 

358 



1,012 



Court Work. 
Cases prosecuted for support of illegitimate children 
Money collected during the year for illegitimate children 
Money paid out for the support of illegitimate children 
Money held for illegitimate children, November 30, 1922 
Number of bank accounts for illegitimate children 



53 

$3,838 69 

2,784 25 

7,318 39 

62 



The collection of money is the duty of the probation officers of the Courts who 
send it to this office. It seems to this subdi\'ision that the probation officers are 
too lenient with the adjudicated fathers of these children, and that payments 
should be more vigorously enforced to fulfill the Court order. 



DIVISION OF CHILD GUARDIANSHIP. 

James E. Fee, Director. 
Children in Care and Custody of the Division. 

At the beginning of the last official year, December 1, 1921, there were 6,216 
children in the care and custody of the Division of Child Guardianship, — 216 
delinquent, 35 wayward, 3,177 neglected, and 2,788 dependent. During the year 
833 children were received, viz: 91 delinquent, 8 wayward, 309 neglected, and 425 
dependent. The total number cared for during the year was 7,049. There were 
922 discharged, viz: 46 delinquent, 15 wayward, 397 neglected, ant.1,464 dependent. 
At the close of the year, Noveml^er 30, 1922, there remained in charge of the 
Division of Child Guardianship, 6,127 children classified as: delinquent 261, way- 
ward 28, neglected 3,089, and dependent 2,749. 

Five thousand seven hundred thirty seven (5,737) of the 6,127 children under 
care November 30, 1922, were over three years of age and cared for as follows: 



16 DEPAllTMEXT OF PUBLIC^ WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 

in places receiving wages, G92; in places free of expense to the State, 730: in 
places partly supi)orted by the State, 236; in places fully supported by the State. 
3,188; at the State Infirmary and other institutions, not correctional, subject to 
care and treatment, 684; in United States service, 52; married, 47; and where- 
abouts unknown, lOS. 

Three hundred ninety (390) children in the total under care November 30, 1922, 
who were under three years of age, were classified as follows: in homes free of 
expense, 28; in homes fully supported by the State, 335; at the State Infirmarv 
or other institutions, 27. In this group, one hundred twenty-eight (128) reached 
the age of three years during the year.^ 

Children under Three Years of Age. 

The number of infants, or children under three years of age, in charge of this 
Division at the beginning of the j^ear, December 1, 1921, was 365; during the 
year 223 were received, and 198 were discharged, making the whole number sup- 
ported 588 — and the number remaining on November 30, 1922 — 390 infants. 

Twelve (12) of the 588 supported were legally adopted; 128, having reached the 
age of three years, were transferred to the sub-division for older children; 31 were 
discharged to parents or relatives, 3 to places of settlement, 4 to courts, and 20 
died; 28 of the remaining 390 infants were placed in homes without expense to 
the State. 

Thirty-nine (39) of the 223 infants received were committed by the overseers 
of the poor, and five by the Superintendent of the State Infirmary under the pro- 
visions of section 22, chapter 119 of the General Laws. This group is made up of 
deserted infants, foundlings, — of whom 12 were received during the year, — and 
dependent infants having no settlement in the Commonwealth. 

There were 122 infants received under the provisions of section 38, chapter 119, 
and 59 were committed by the Courts under section 42, chapter 119. Three in- 
fants removed from unsuitable boarding places were taken under the provisions 
of section 28 of the same chapter. The fact that it was found necessary to remove 
these three children during the year indicates that close and constant inspection 
of infant boarding homes must be continued in order that the lives of infants may 
be protected and a recurrence of the old baby farm practices prevented. 

Four visiting nurses made 7,346 visits. This number includes (1) visits to in- 
fant wards boarding in families, (2) investigations of prospective boarding homes 
for infants, and (3) inspections of homes of applicants for licenses to maintain 
boarding homes for infants. 

Our physician made 1,801 physical examinations. Included in this number are 
the initial examinations which always take place on admission, and the re-exami- 
nations of children as required from time to time; these examinations are generally 
made at the Nursery which is a temporary home or receiving station for children 
under three years of age. Three hundred forty-five (345) children were admitted 
to the Nursery during the year and but one death occurred there. 

Of the twenty deaths of children under three years of age, five (5) died in hos- 
pitals, seven (7) in the State Infirmary, seven (7) in private homes, and one (1) in 
the Nursery. 

One hundred and fifty-five (155) of the five hundred and eighty-eight (588) 
infants supported were under one year of age. Nine of this number died, making 
the percentage of deaths of infants under one year of age 5.8%. 

1 In addition to these 6,127 children, the Department had under its supervision and visitation November 
30, 1922, 391 boys at the Lyman School for Boys; 272 girls at the Industrial School for Girls; 230 boys at the 
Industrial School for Boys; 2,771 boys and 457 girls in the custody of the Trustees of the Massachusetts Train- 
ing Schools, outside the schools; 125 boys and 99 girls, patients at the Massachusetts Hospital School; and 
166 children, patients at the State Infirmary, who are either young infants with their mothers, or else under 
hospital treatment, making approximately a total of 10,638 children in the care and custody or under the 
supervision of the Department. There were also 1,037 children supported at the expense of cities and towns 
who were subject to the Department's visitation reported upon at page 54. 



Part I, 



DIVISION OF CHILD GUARDIANSHIP. 



17 



Mortality Rate. 



From birth to one year 
From one to two years 
From two to three years 



9, or 5.8 per cent. 
8, or 4.21 per cent. 
3, or 1.23 per cent. 



The percentage of mortality for the year for the whole number supported wa.s 
3.4% plus. 

Details of Mortality of Infants under One Year of Age. 

Placed in Hospitals. 





Under Care 


Length of Time 
in Hospital 


Age at Death 


Cause of Death 


A . . . 
B . . . 

C . . . 
D . . . 
E . . . 


8 weeks . 
3^ months 

3 months 
3 months 
6 weeks . 


8 weeks . 
3j months 

1 day . 
19 days . 
3i months . 


3i months . 
10 months . 

4 months 
4 months 
9 months . 


Congenital sj-philis. 

Following operation on eyes. Con- 
tributory cause, gonorrheal infec- 
tion. 

Whooping cough and convulsions. 

Congenital s\-philis. 

Primary cause, chicken pox. Con- 
tributory, congenital s>-philis, oti- 
tis media, malnutrition, multiple 
abscesses of skin. 



Boarded in Private Families. 





Under C.a.re 


Age at Time of Death 


Cause of Death 


A . . . . 

B . . . . 
C . . . . 
D .. . . 


1 day 

2| months 
4 davs 
6 weeks . 


6^ months .... 
Died at nursery 1 day 
after admittance. 
4i months .... 
7^ months .... 
7 weeks .... 


Malnutrition. 

Acute nephritis. 
Congenital syphilis. 
Bronchial pneumonia. 



Details of ^Mortality of Infants between One and Three Years. 
Placed in Hospitals. 



Under Care 



Lengthof Time j 
in Hospital | 



Age at Death 



Cause of Death 



18J months 

11 months 

3 days . 

! 11 months 

1 8J months 

I 12i months 



18^ months 

10 months 
3 days . 

11 months 
8J months 
10 days . 



20^ months . 

loj months . 

2 years 3 months 

2^ years 

2 years 

15 months 



Gastritis. 

Congenital syphilis. 
Ileocolitis. 
Cerebral paralysis. 
Spinal meningitis. 
Empyema. 



Boarded in Private Families. 



Under Care Age at Time of Death 



Cause of Death 



11§ months 
6 months 

1 month . 

2 months 3 weeks 
7 J months 



16 months . 
13i months . 
16 months 
2 years 1 month 
1 year 8 days 



Convulsions. 
Infectious diarrhoea. 
Endocarditis. 
Intestinal indigestion. 
Status lyraphaticus. 



18 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 



Children over Three Years of Age. 

At the beginning of the year, December 1, 1921, there were 5,851 children (3,217 
boys and 2,634 girls) : to this number were added 738, of which 610 were new cases 
and 128 transferred from sub-division for infants. Twenty-one (21) died, 229 
became of age, 46 were adopted, 75 were sent to correctional institutions, and 481 
were otherwise discharged, leaving 5,737 — 3,165 boys and 2,572 girls under care 
November 30, 1922. The decrease in population was 114 or 1.94%. 

The completion and opening of the Bradford Infirmary at Canton, a hospital 
for our wards, has filled a need which has been recognized for several years. For- 
merly' sick children were sent to local hospitals in emergencies or acute illnesses, 
while chronic cases and those requiring long courses of treatment were placed at 
the State Infirmar}'. That we now have a hospital exclusively for our sick wards 
is a source of gratification to all concerned in the welfare of these children. 

There were 869 girls and 1,285 bo3^s over 14 years of age under care. Four hun- 
dred seventy-seven (477) girls or 54.8% and 467 boys or 36.3% of this group are 
attending school. As many of these chil ren have been handicapped by poor en- 
vironment and have been deprived of educational advantages previous to commit- 
ment, it is obvious that the majority are unable to complete the prescribed course 
at as early an age as children who have been more fortunate. It is gratifying, 
however, to see the large numbers who are making the most of their opportunities; 
and the growing percentage of boys who are continuing at school beyond the gram- 
mar grades. If thej^ have abilitj^ and ambition, ways and means are usually found. 
One hundred forty-seven (147) of our wards, — 85 boys and 62 girls, are living in 
families without expense to the State while attending school, and 28 boys and 82 
girls receive wages for services rendered out of school hours. 

These conditions are the result of the constant efforts of the visitors of this 
Division to give to every child all possible opportunities for securing an education, 
together with the assistance and co-operation of men and women throughout the 
State who aid the visitors in their efforts. 



At School — over IJf Years of Age. 



Boys 



Girls 



Attending — 

Grammar school . 

High school 

Normal school 

Trades school 

Business school 

Evening school 

Colleges ..... 
Under following conditions: 

Receiving wages . 

Free of expense 

Partly free (clothing provided) 

On parole with parents 

Board and clothing provided 



316 


207 


110 


211 


1 


12 


30 


17 


1 


5 


7 


23 


2 


2 


28 


82 


85 


62 


57 


157 


34 


18 


263 


158 



Our men visitors attend all cases of neglect and those of delinquency and way- 
wardness in which boys are involved. 

In juvenile sessions of Courts where no women probation officers are employed 
our women visitors are required to attend to hear charges brought against any 
girl, even though not a ward of the State. This work involves much time and 
thought. When sufficient notice is given our visitor makes an investigation on 
the preceding day that she may have the facts well in mind. 

Women visitors attended in all 195 cases this year. Ninety of these cases re- 
quired more than one hearing to determine final disposition, so that only 105 were 
actuallv new. 



Part I.] 



DIVISION OF CHILD GUARDIANSHIP. 



19 



Of this number the specific charges were as follows : — 



Stubbornness 


. 85 


Truancy .... 


. 7 


Lewdness . 


. 30 


Idle and disorderly 


. 4 


Larceny . 


. 19 


Vagrancy .... 


. 2 


Fornication 


. 16 


Cursing and swearing 


1 


Assault and battery . 


. 14 


Wayward .... 


. 8 


Runaway . 


. 9 







It is interesting to note that the cause of the greatest number of complaints is 
stubbornness and that next in order come lewdness, larceny and fornication. This 
same sequence occurred last year, showing that the greatest number of girls before 
our Courts continue to be there because of faulty home training. 

The final dispositions were as follows : — 



Committed to Industrial School for Girls . 
Placed on probation .... 

Filed 

Dismissed 

Committed to Division of Child Guardianship 

Given suspended sentence to Industrial School for Girls 

Committed to Industrial School for Girls and appealed 

Sent to House of Good Shepherd .... 



27 

21 

15 

13 

13 

9 

5 

2 



The best news to report this year in regard to the feeble-minded is the cheering 
prospect of the speedy commitment of a goodly number of girls and boys to the 
Schools for the feeble-minded. The new institution at Belchertown is nearly 
completed and early in the new year it is planned to relieve the State Infirmary 
of all those there who are teachable and not receiving treatment for physical 
ailments. 

On November 30, 1922, there were 90 boys and 81 girls under consideration for 
such transfer. 

In the community, however, there were at board on that date 99 girls and 59 
boys who are in need of institutional supervision. During the past year but one 
boy and three girls were admitted at Wrentham and nine boys and six girls at 
Waverley (4 of these from the State Infirmary) against 44 admitted to the schools 
for the feeble-minded during the previous year. 

Sixty-eight per cent (68%) of the boarding girls are 14 years old and over. Forty- 
two (42) girls and 33 boys are attending public school, two girls in special classes 
for backward children, and one girl, 18 years old, in High School. This girl, who 
three years ago was classed as feeble-minded, was removed from a group-home of 
feeble-minded girls to a home by herself with special advantages and has improved 
so rapidly that after two subsequent tests by the same alienist was pronounced 
not feeble-minded, and will graduate next year from business course at High School. 
Her teachers have said she has developed a more than average mind. 

The policy of placing the more capable girl, after some household training, to 
work and earn for herself has developed with gratifying results. The girls boarding 
in group-homes are not particularly happy. They bicker and clamor to go to work. 
The number of these girls placed out has increased from 14 last year to 29. They 
are enabled to buy their clothing and have some spending money. Their savings 
bank deposits in one quarter aggregated over $537. Three, so self-supporting, 
were this 3^ear discharged at twentj^-one years of age. This feature has proved that 
effort with the individual girl — the study of the personality — is well worth 
while, even with the feeble-minded. 



20 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 



Adoptions. 

Applications for children for adoption: 

Pending at the Ix^ginning of the year ....... 16 

New applications . . . . . . . . . . .113 



Disapproved without investigation ........ 2 

Withdrawn 27 

Investigated ............ 83 

Pending . . . . . . . . . . .17 



129 



129 



Homes investigated ............ 83 

Approved ............ 49 

Disapproved ............ 34 

Forty-four (44) children have been placed on trial for adoption during the year. 
Sixty-one (61) children have been legally adopted — forty-four (44) girls and 
seventeen (17) boys. 

The oldest child adopted was a girl fifteen years of age, the youngest a girl one 
year of age. One child died while on trial. 

There are now on trial for adoption sixty-eight (68) children. 

The adoption of children is without question one of the most satisfactory branches 
of our work. Careful selection of homes in which to place children for adoption is 
our chief aim. Every effort is made to fit the child to the home and the family, and 
b\' constant supervision and inspection to see that the child continues to be fitted 
to the home and familj^ Applications for children to adopt come to the Division 
from people in all stations of life so far as wealth is concerned. Indeed one of our 
most troublesome problems is to keep people from adopting children who are not 
mentally normal or whose future, by inheritance or otherwise, seems doubtful. 

The technical detail of putting adoptions through the Probate Courts involves 
considerable study and investigation. In some cases the parents of the child to be 
adopted have disappeared and have not been heard from for years. Every effort 
is made to locate such parents by searching the birth, marriage or death records, 
or writing and seeing friends or relatives if possible. Sometimes extensive search 
fails to locate parents. In other cases the child is of unknown parentage, or in 
other words, a foundling. In these cases the Division has the advantage of certain 
statutes which obviate consent of parents to the adoption of their child in case 
they have wilfully deserted or suffered the child to be supported as a pauper for 
two 3'ears or more. The law very properly says to parents in effect: If you are not 
sufficiently interested in 3'our child to visit or inquire for it and allow it to be sup- 
ported b}'' the public for two j'ears, the law will step in and permit people who are 
interested in your child to adopt it without your consent. Invariably parents of 
children who have been separated from them for a long time wiUingly consent to 
their adoption when interviewed by our agent. 

Adoptions were allowed during the year in the following counties: Berkshire, 1 
Bristol, 2; Essex, 8; Hampden, 2; Hampshire, 1; Middlesex, 22; Norfolk, 5 
Plvmouth, 5; Suffolk, 9; Worcester, 5; Rockingham County, New Hampshire, 1 
total, 61. 

Subdivision of Investigation. 

The cases handled by the investigating department for the year 1921-1922 show 
no radical difference from the problems of preceding years. There has been a 
decrease in the number of applications, though eight more children have been 
received as dependent than last year. 

An anal3^sis of the cases received shows that the largest contributory cause is 
death of the mother. We have before mentioned the helplessness of the widower 
with a large famih^ of small children. The problem is still unsolved except by 
breaking up the family and placing the children. The second in importance of the 
causes for receiving children is illegitimacy, although this alone has never been a 



PartL] DIVISION OF CHILD GUARDIANSHIP. 21 

sufficient reason for separating mother and child. Mental or physical handicap is 
usually coupled with this cause. Desertion of one or both parents holds the third 
place, and among other causes are illness of parents and need of special prolonged 
care for children impossible to obtain under existing home conditions. 

Under section 22, chapter 119, General Laws, children without known settle- 
ment are committed by the overseers of the poor to the care of this Division. This 
section functions chiefly in cases of abandoned children. By provision of this 
law foundlings must be so committed. There were 12 foundlings during the year, 
a decrease of over 50%. Four of these were identified. One was placed in the 
Reformatory for Women with the mother who was sentenced on the abandonment 
charge. The other three are still in care but the parents are supporting in two in- 
stances, and legal settlement has been estabhshed in the fourth. In the latter case, 
however, the mother has disappeared, and the city of settlement is assuming the 
responsibility of support. 

There were 80 other commitments during the year under this section. Often 
abandoning parents are not located but in every instance all clues are exhausted 
before these cases are closed. As a result of these after-care cases, however, many 
discharges are arranged and a sense of responsibihty and even affection is fostered 
in the parents. In some instances legal residence in other states has been estab- 
lished and transportation arranged for. 

It is to be hoped that the need of thorough investigation in all adoptions will 
sometime be recognized by the courts. At present the signatures of the parents 
and the presence of the adopting parents is all that is required in many courts. 
The suitability of either the home or the child does not enter into consideration. 
An occasional flagrant case comes to the attention of this Division. In one instance 
a year old baby was adopted by a self-respecting family who knew nothing of the 
parentage. At the age of three the child proved so low grade as to be diagnosed 
an idiot. The adoption is to be annulled and the child placed in a proper institu- 
tion. A knowledge of the inheritance would have delaj^ed this action. 

On the whole during the past year there has been a growing tendency to greater 
co-operation with the charity departments of many of the other states. The Treaty 
with Canada granting extradition for non-support which became effective October 
24, 1922, will undoubtedly prove of great value to this department, although as 
yet it is too soon to determine the results. 

Following are the statistics of the Subdivision of Investigation : — 

Applications pending December 1, 1921 (chapter 119, section 38, General Laws) 216 

Applications received 1,149 

1,365 

Disposition as follows: 

Application withdrawn 109 

Ad\'ised only 24 

Assumed by relatives and friends 364 

Assumed by public agencies 243 

Assumed by private agencies 79 

Received (chapter 119, section 38, General Laws) 329 

Pending December 1, 1922 217 

1,365 

Applications for discharge pending December 1, 1921 28 

Applications received 213 

241 

Disposition as follows: 

Discharged . . . . ' 134 

Discharge refused 17 

Applications withdrawn 31 

Pending December 1, 1922 59 

241 

After care: 

Pending December 1, 1921 17 

New cases added 50 

67 

Closed 50 

Pending December 1, 1922 17 

67 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 



It is the policy of this sub-division to require parents to support their children 
in whole or in part, if they are financially able to do so. 

Paj'inents are received upon voluntary agreement, in cases of neglect upon order 
of the Court, also as a result of prosecution for non-support. 

It is a difficult matter for us to obtain contributions with any degree of regu- 
larity. Constant pressure must be brought to bear on parents who are responsible 
for the support of their children. 

The receipts for contributory support of children in charge of this Department 
are shown in the following table : — 

Collections for Support received from Cities and Towns and directly from Parents. 



Yeau 


Direct 


Cities and 
Towns 


Total 


1913 
1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 
1919 
1920 
1921 
1922 






















S6,999 30 
8,017 75 
7,106 88 
12,528 02 
16,620 52 
25,936 02 
34,084 65 
41,492 42 
33,258 83 
29,847 30 


S9,240 71 
11,496 87 
17.959 41 
21,828 07 
24,651 03 
28,545 45 
44,816 77 
57,433 73 
62,771 26 
62,623 99 


S16,240 01 
19,514 62 
25,066 29 
34,356 09 
41.271 55 
54,481 47 
78,901 42 
98,926 15 
96,030 09 
92,471 29 



Summary of Children under Three Years of Age. 





Dependent 


Neglected 


Grand 




Boys Girls 


Total 


Boys Girls 

1 


Total 


Total 


Number December 1, 1921 
Received December 1, 1921, to November 30, 
1922 


162 
92 


132 

72 


294 
164 


39 
32 


32 

27 


71 
59 


365 
223 


Total number in charge .... 
Number transferred to department for children 

over three years of age 

Number discharged and died .... 


254 

52 
35 


204 

36 
24 


458 

88 
59 


71 

23 
9 


59 

17 
2 


130 

40 
11 


588 

128 
70 


Number remaining December 1, 1922 


167 


144 


311 


39 


40 


79 


390 



Part L] 



DIVISION OF CHILD GUARDIANSHIP. 



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24 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. 



Disposition of Children over Three Years of Age in Custody during the Year ending 

November SO, 1922. 





Girls 


Boys 


In homes, receiving wages 

In homes, frw of t>xi>t>nse to State . 

In liomes, clothing only provided 

In homes, board and clothing provided . 

In institutions 

United States Service .... 

Married 

Whereabouts unknown .... 










275 
297 
170 
1,423 
343 

41 
23 


417 

433 

66 

1.765 

341 

52 

6 

85 


Total number in charge November 30, 1922 

Died 

Of age 

Transferred to Lyman School for Boys 
Transferred to Industrial School for lioys 
Transferred to Industrial School for Girls 
Committed to Lyman School for Boys 
Committed to Industrial School for iioys 
Committed to Department for Defective DeHnquents 
Committed to Industrial School for Girls 
Committed to other correctional institutions . 

Adopted 

Discharged 


2,572 

9 

103 

6 

3 

1 
35 
199 


3,165 

12 

126 

14 

6 

20 
11 
14 

11 

282 


Total number in custody during the year 








2.928 


3,661 



Applications for Discharge. ^ 





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116 


11 


44 


54 


3 


19 


Delinquent 


3 


36 


1 


15 


20 


- 


3 


Wayward 


_ 


1 


— 


— 


1 


- 


— 


Section 38, chapter 119, General Laws .... 


20 


127 


72 


15 


26 


15 


19 


Section 22, chapter 119, General Laws .... 


4 


34 


18 


10 


2 


3 


5 


Total 


42 


314 


102 


84 


103 


21 


46 



Discharges for adoption and transfers to industrial schools are not included in this table. 



Disposition by the Courts of Cases of Delinquent and Wayward Children. 
Number of court notices received ......... 



Cases disposed of as follows; — 
Committed to Lyman School for Boys ...... 

Committed to Lyman School for Boys and appealed 
Committed to Lyman School for Boys and sentence suspended 
Committed to Industrial School for Boys .... 

Committed to Industrial School for Boys and appealed . 
Committed to Industrial School for Boys and sentence suspended 
Committed to Industrial School for Girls .... 

Committed to Industrial School for Girls and appealed . 
Committed to Industrial School for Girls and sentence suspended 
Committed to Department of Public Welfare 
Committed to Department of Public Welfare and appealed 
Committed to Department of Public Welfare and sentence suspended 
Committed to Massachusetts Reformatory ..... 



208 
73 

274 

118 
56 

161 
69 
10 
39 
54 
4 
14 
2 



Part L] 



DIVISION OF CHILD GUARDIANSHIP. 



25 



Committed to Department for Defective Delinquents 
Committed to County Training Schools .... 

Committed to County Training Schools and appealed 
Committed to County Training Schools and sentence suspended 
Committed to House of Correction 
Committed to House of Correction and appealed 
Held for Superior Court .... 
Probation ....... 

Fined 

Fined and appealed ..... 

Fine suspended ...... 

Continued ....... 

Continued in care of Department of Public Welfare 
Failed to appear ...... 

Discharged ...... 

Dismissed ....... 

Filed 



Appealed from finding 



2 

35 

2 

27 

3 

2 

50 

1,731 

222 

24 

28 

1,075 

47 

88 

309 

293 

1,027 

21 



Total cases disposed of . . , . . . . . . . . 6,068 



Disposition by the Courts of Cases of Neglected Children. 
Number of court notices received ........ 



736 



Cases disposed of as follows: — 
Committed to Department of Public Welfare 
Committed to Department of Public Welfare and appealed 
Committed to Department of Public Welfare and sentence suspended 
Committed to Child Welfare Division . 
Placed on file ..... 

Discharged ..... 

Dismissed ...... 

Continued ...... 

Continued and placed in Home for Destitute Catholic Children 

Continued in charge of Department of Public Welfare 

Failed to appear ......... 

Appealed from finding ....... 



203 

29 

11 

13 

26 

13 

34 

484 

109 

73 

9 

3 



Total cases disposed of . 



1,007 



Localities whence New Children were received. 



Abington . 

Acton 

Adams 

Andover . 

Arlington . 

Athol 

Attleboro . 

Ayer 

Belmont 

Berkley 

Beverly 

Billerica 

Boston 

Bridgewater 

Brockton . 

Brookline . 

Cambridge 

Canton 

Chelsea 

Chicopee . 

Clinton 

Dalton 

Dartmouth 

Dedham 

Dracut 

Easthampton 

Enfield 

Everett 

Falmouth . 

Fall River 





1 


Fitchburg . 


13 


Millbury . 


1 




1 


Foxborough 


1 


Monson 


1 




2 


Framingham 


2 


Montague . 


3 




2 


Franklin . 


5 


Natick 


1 




5 


Gardner 


7 


New Bedford 


6 




4 


Gloucester 


14 


Newburyport 


4 




18 


Greenfield . 


3 


Newton 


8 




1 


Groton 


1 


Northampton 


6 




1 


Hanson 


1 


Northborough 


1 




2 


Harwich 


5 


Norwood . 


2 




4 


Haverhill . 


9 


Oxford 


1 




1 


Hingham . 


3 


Palmer 


6 




210 


Holland . 


1 


Pittsfield . 


. 12 




4 


Holyoke 


19 


Plymouth . 


4 




17 


Hubbardston 


3 


Provincetown 


2 




5 


Hudson 


2 


Quincy 


9 




22 


Ipswich 


1 


Randolph . 


2 




1 


Lakeville . 


2 


Reading 


4 




11 


Lawrence . 


31 


Rehoboth . 


1 




2 


Lenox 


1 


Revere 


3 




1 


Leominster 


7 


Rutland . 


1 




1 


Lexington . 


5 


Salem 


3 




2 


Lowell 


21 


Saugus 


6 




7 


Ludlow 


1 


Shcrborn . 


o 




1 


Lvnn 


29 


Sonicrvillc 


9 




6 


Maiden 


10 


Southl)ridge 


15 




2 


Marlborough 


2 


Springfield 


27 




6 


Maj-nard . 


2 


Stoughton 


4 




4 


Melrose 


2 


Sutton 


o 




10 


Methuen . 


1 


Taunton . 


5 



26 



DEP.\RTMEXT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 



Tewksbury 
Tisbury . 
Uxbridge . 
AVakefield . 


. 34 
1 
1 
7 


Webster . 
Wellesley . 
West borough 
West field . 


1 
2 

1 

1 


Walpole . 
Waltham . 


1 
3 


West Springfield 
Weymouth 


1 
4 


Watertown 


6 


Winchendon 


•> 


Waverley . 


1 


Winthrop . 


8 



Woburn 


. 12 


AVorcester . 


27 


Augusta, Me. 


1 


Elizabeth, xN. J. . 


3 


Manchester, N. H. 


1 



Total 



833 



Licensed Boarding Houses for Infants. 

During the last official year 348 licenses to maintain boarding houses for infants 
were granted under the provisions of General Laws, chapter 119, section 2, in 92 
cities and towns, in addition to the 315 licenses in force at the expiration of the 
previous \'ear; 296 licenses expired by the one-j'ear limitation; 46 were cancelled 
(37 because of changes of residence, 3 because of death of boarding-woman, 3 as 
boarding women wished to take up other work, 1 was lost in the mail, 1 as boarding- 
woman was in poor health, 1 because boarding-woman adopted an infant under 
two years); 19 were withdrawn, 12 were refused; and 325 licenses, permitting the 
boarding of 680 infants in 82 cities and towns, remained in force November 30, 
1922. These represent the licensed homes, not onlj'- of infants supported by the 
Commonwealth, but also of those under the age of two years placed out bj- parents 
and man}^ private agencies. 

During the past year, the State nurses have made 1,658 visits to infants placed 
in homes under private supervision and the supervision of societies. (Visits to 
infants under the supervision of the Department of Public Welfare are not included.) 

It has been necessary to take court action in private cases where laws governing 
the protection of infants (chapter 119) were wilfulty violated, and strict supervision 
is being kept in many instances. 

Summary of Infants under Two Years of Age reported to the Department of Public Wel- 
fare from December 1, 1921, to November SO, 1922, under Chapter 119 of the General 
Laws, which provides for the Protection of Infants and the Licensing and Regulation 
of Boarding Houses for them. 



SUPERVISION OF 



Division of Child Guardianship, Department of Public Welfare, State House 

Private . 

St. Mary's Infant Asylum, Boston 

Boston Children's Aid Society 

Child Welfare Division, City of Boston 

The Talitha Cumi Home, Boston 

Worcester Children's Friend Society 

New Bedford Children's Aid Society 

New England Home for Little Wanderers, Boston ..... 

Sisters of Providence, Brightside, Holyoke 

Children's Bureau, Federated Jewish Charities ...... 

Boston Children's Friend Society 

Springfield Children's Aid Society 

Church Home Society, Boston 

Lynn Catholic Charities Center 

Brockton Catholic Charities Center 

Bethlehem Home, Taunton 

Child Welfare House, Lynn 

Catholic Charitable Bureau, Boston 

Avon Home, Cambridge 

Salem Catholic Charities Center 

Temporary Home and Day Nursery, Worcester 

New England Home for Little Wanderers, Pittsfield 

Children's Mission to Children, Boston 

Somerville Catholic Charities Center 

Northampton Children's Aid Association . 

Industrial School for Girls, Parole Department, Boston .... 
LawTence City Mission 



Number of 
Infants 
reported 



391 

988 

233 

81 

73 

39 

49 

37 

31 

58 

44 

25 

23 

19 

21 

15 

45 

17 

21 

19 

7 

12 

7 

7 

7 



Part I.] 



DIVISION OF CHILD GUARDIANSHIP. 



27 



Summary of Infants under Two Years of Age reported to the Department of Public Wel- 
fare from December 1, 1921, to November SO, 1922, under Chapter 119 of the General 
Laws, which provides for the Protection of Infants and the Licensing and Regulation 
of Boarding Houses for them — Concluded. 



Supervision of — 


Number of 
Infants 
reported 


South End Chinese Mission, Boston 

House of Mercy, Boston 

Family Welfare Association, Brockton 

Home for Friendless Women and Children, Springfield 

Probation officer, Boston 

Lawrence Catholic Charities Center 

Florence Crittenton League of Compassion, Boston 

Department of Correction, State House, Boston 

Probation officer, Newton 

Knights of Columbus Guild, Lowell 

Boston Lying-in Hospital, Social Service Department 

Boston North End Mission 

Guild of St. Agnes, Worcester 

Boston Society for the Care of Girls 

Division of Aid and Relief, Department of Public Welfare, State House .... 

Haverhill Children's Aid Society 

Overseers of the Poor, Framingham 


3 
5 
2 
11 
4 
7 
4 
1 
1 
4 
2 
1 
3 
2 
1 
3 
1 




2,348 



The actual number of infants reported, less duplication of supervision, was 2,339. 
Of this number, 73 died and 36 were adopted. 



2S 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 



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Two months but under three . 
Three months but under four . 
Four months but under five . 
Five months but under six 
Six months but under one year 
One year but under two years . 


to 





Part LI DIVISION OF CHILD GUARDIANSHIP. 29 



Licensed Lying-in Hospitals, 1921-1922. 

Licenses in force December 1, 1921 (in 95 towns) ....... 219 

Expired during the year (1921-1922) 115 

Surrendered during the year (1921-1922) ...... 20 135 

Continuing in force during 1922 .......... 84 

Reissues during 1922 ......... 42 

New issues during 1922 93 135 

Licenses in force November 30, 1922 (in 98 towns) ....... 219 

Corporations ........... 106 

Physicians ........... 31 

Registered nurses .......... 33 

Overseers of the poor ......... 10 

Other persons .......... 39 

219 

Applications refused, 7. 

The inspector made 294 visits to hospitals, and 32 visits investigating complaints. 

In November, 1922, a questionnaire was mailed each licensee and the returns 
show 27,550 cases delivered in 203 hospitals — deaths of mothers, 323, making the 
maternal mortality 1.17%; deaths of babies 903, infant mortality 3.27%; still- 
births 1,061 or 3.85%. 

Two hundred twenty (220) notices of discharge from maternity hospitals of 
infants with inflamed eyes were received during the year. Twenty-nine (29) of 
the 203 hospitals reported eye infection; .79% of the total number of births showed 
infection of the eyes. 

The following table shows in detail the reports received in accordance with Rule 
9, for the period from December 1, 1921, to November 30, 1922. 



30 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 









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Part LI 



DIVISION OF CHILD GUARDIANSHIP. 



31 



Tuition of Children under the Care and Control of The Department. 

Under the operation of General Laws, chapter 76, sections 7 to 10, inclusive, 
governing reimbursements by the Commonwealth for tuition of State wards in 
public schools, bills received from 178 cities and towns for the tuition and trans- 
portation of 2,575 children, amounting to $111,986.02, — viz., schooling $111,- 
540.45; transportation, $445.57 — were audited by the Department and paid by 
the Treasurer of the Commonwealth during the last official year. The distribution 
of the children was as follows : — 



Alford (1921) . 


2 


Greenwich 




14 


Peabody . 




Alford (1922) . 


1 


Groton 


13 


Pelham 




Amesbury . 


4 


Hadley 




5 


Pepperell . 




Amherst . 


57 


Halifax 




6 


Phillipston 




Andover . 


10 


Hamilton 




1 


Pittsfield . 




Arlington . 


10 


Hampden 




49 


Plympton . 




Ashfield . 


2 


Harwich 




11 


Prescott . 




Asliland 


8 


HaverhUl 




7 


Reading (1920) 




Athol 


19 


Heath 




2 


Reading (1921) 




Attleboro (1921) 


3 


Hingham 




1 


Rehoboth . 




Attleboro (1922) 


2 


Hinsdale 




24 


Rowley 




Ayer 


10 


Holden 




1 


Royalston . 




Barre 


7 


Holland 




1 


Rutland . 




Becket 


18 


Holliston 




15 


Salem 




Belmont . 


8 


Holyoke 




3 


Salisbury . 




Berkley . 


7 


Hopedale 




1 


Saugus 




Berlin 


13 


Hopkinton 


62 


Savoy 




Bernardston 


5 


Hubbardston 


6 


Sherborn . 




Beverly 


9 


Hudson 


12 


Shirley 




Billerica . 


4 


Huntington 


7 


Somerset . 




Bolton 


5 


Ipswich 


2 


Somerville 




Boxborough 


1 


Kingston . 


9 


South Hadley 




Boxford 


4 


Lanesborough 


2 


Southampton 




Brewster . 


25 


Lawrence . 


13 


Springfield 




Bridgewater 


8 


Leominster 


7 


Stoneham . 




Brimfield . 


33 


Leverett . 


4 


Stow 




Brookfield 


2 


Leyden 


6 


Sudbury . 




Brookline . 


4 


Lincoln 


14 


Sunderland 




Cambridge 


78 


Lynn 


46 


Sutton 




Canton 


20 


Lynnfield . 


10 


Swampscott 




Chatham . 


2 


Maiden 


29 


Taunton . 




Cheshire . 


8 


Marblehead 


9 


Templeton 




Chester 


14 


Marlborough 


43 


Tewksbury 




Chesterfield 


5 


Maynard . 


5 


Upton (1921) 




Chicopee . 


17 


Medfield 




2 


Upton (1922) 




Concord . 


8 


Medford 




96 


Uxbridge . 




Conway 


16 


Melrose 




23 


Wakefield . 




Cummington 


5 


Mendon 




8 


Wales 




Dana 


7 


Methuen 




2 


Waltham . 




Danvers 


24 


Middleborough . 


38 


Ware (1921) 




Dedham 


45 


Middlefield 


11 


Ware (1922) 




Deerfield . 


1 


Middleton 


6 


Washington 




Dennis 


1 


Milford . 


31 


Watertown 




Dighton 


5 


Millis 


2 


Wayland . 




Douglas 


15 


Monson 


13 


Wendell . 




Dover 


1 


Montague . 


6 


West Newbury 




Dracut 


11 


Montgomery 


8 


West Springfield 




Dunstable 


11 


New Ashford 


2 


West Stockbridg 


2 (1921) 


East Bridgewater 


23 


New liedford . 


1 


West Stockbridg 


3 (1922) 


Easthampton 


3 


New Marlborough 


4 


Westborough 




Enfield . 


58 


Newburyport 


7 


Westfield . 




Everett 


27 


Newton 


72 


Weston 




Falmouth . 


9 


North Adams 


8 


Wilbraham 




Fitch burg . 


13 


North Attleborough 


2 


Williamsburg 




Framingham , . 


62 


Northborough . 


10 


AVilliamstown 




Franklin . 


16 


Northfield 


1 


Wilmington . 




Gardner . 


7 


Norton 


12 


Winchester 




Georgetown 


21 


Oak Bluffs 


3 


Winthrop . 




Gloucester 


G 


Orange (1921) . 


28 


Wo burn 




Goshen 


3 


Orleans 


8 


Worthington 




Grafton 


3 


Otis . 


3 






■Greenfield . 


13 


Palmer 




19 


Total . 


.2 



,575 



32 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 



DIVISION OF JUVENILE TRAINING. 

Charles M. Davenport, Director. 
Robert J. Watson, Executive Secretary. 

On November 30, 1922, the total number of children who were wards of the 
Trustees of Massachusetts Training Schools was 4,121, distributed as follows: — 



School 


In the Schools 


On Parole 


Totals 


Lyman School for lioys 

Industrial School for Boys 

Industrial School for Girls 


391 
230 
272 


L865 
906 
457 


2,256 
L136 

729 




893 


3,228 


4.121 



During the j-ear 1922 the number of commitments to the three schools dropped 
considerablj' as compared with the previous two years. Commitments to the 
Lyman School for Boys decreased 18.75 per cent in 1922 from 1921. The Indus- 
trial School for Girls shows a decrease of only 9 per cent while the Industrial School 
for Boys shows a decrease of 22.5 per cent. The decrease in the number of com- 
mitments has resulted in a lower daily average number of inmates in all of the 
schools. 

The trustees have held twelve meetings during the year in addition to forty- 
eight meetings of various committees. Each request for the release or parole of 
a boy or girl is given careful and thorough attention by the trustees. A total of 
133 separate visits have been made to the three schools by members of the Board 
of Trustees during the past year. In addition to these visits made by the trustees, 
the executive secretary of the Board has visited the three schools thirty-three 
times during the year. When a boy is ready for parole, the parole visitor inves- 
tigates his home and makes a report to the trustees. If the boy's home seems 
to offer a fair chance of his succeeding there on his return, the trustees will give him 
a trial at home. If he does not succeed, he will be returned to the school and 
perhaps placed out with a family in the country until he seems worthy of another 
trial at home. 

The savings accounts of boys and girls on parole continue to grow. All boys 
and girls are urged to save in order that they may have something to start with 
when the}^ reach the age of twenty-one and pass out of the trustees' care. At the 
close of the vear the Boys' Parole Branch reported a total balance on deposit of 
S23,990.40 representing 750 accounts. This is a net gain of $4,112.59 over the 
previous 3'ear. The Girls' Parole Branch had a balance on deposit of $20,072.91 
for the corresponding period, representing 567 accounts, a net gain of $2,078.51. 

Boys' Parole Branch. 

John J. Smith, Superintendent. 

Some indication of the improvement in business as affecting our boys may be 
seen bj^ noting that of the 1,860 on parole from Lyman School for Boys, only 47 
were classed as idle, and of the 907 on parole from the Industrial School for Boys 
only 35 were idle. Most of our boys during the business depression learned the 
lesson of holding their jobs, with the result that now most of them are steadily 
employed. 

It is becoming more and more apparent that though a home may be weak, a 
boy will ordinarily do better in it than with strangers. So far as possible the 
Trustees have paroled to their own homes boys who had a reasonable chance to 
make good there. However, if a boy fails at home he and his parents can then 
understand why he is placed out in a foster home. 



PartL] HOUSING AND TOWN PLANNING. 33 

The number of boys returned to Lyman School during the year totals 440, as 
compared with 458 in 1921, and to the Industrial School for Boys 99 as compared 
with 103 in 1921. These numbers are large, and we look for a marked improvement 
because of the more strict discipline now in effect at the schools for these boys 
who are returned because of violation of parole. 

Girls' Parole Branch. 

Miss Almeda F. Cree, Superintendent. 

Our foster homes are selected with the greatest care. That does not mean that 
girls, even in these homes, can be left without visiting. All girls should be visited 
often enough for the visitors to have a real influence over them, to keep them 
interested and encouraged, and to guide the employers or relatives in judicious 
management of them. Visitors should be ever on the watch to maintain a sym- 
pathetic, wholesome attitude toward the girl in her own home as well as in her foster 
home, and to know that she is given the best opportunities to succeed. 

Nearly all the girls placed in foster homes are placed within a fifteen mile radius 
of Boston. It is a pity to lose the splendid opportunities that our country village 
homes offer. There the girl can enter into the church and neighborhood activi- 
ties in ways which are not possible in the city or near-city home. 

If each visitor has her girls grouped in a territory wholly her own she may have 
more time for visiting and can search out and open up many new avenues for the 
advancement of her girls. This readjustment, to be successfully done, must be 
accomplished gradually and without causing commotion among the girls. A 
careful study of this question will be made during the year. 

HOUSING AND TOWN PLANNING. ^ 

Miss Miriam I. Ross, Secretary. 

The city planning movement in Massachusetts had its origin in an attempt to 
solve the housing problem. A study of the question revealed the fact that the prob- 
lem was bigger than just housing; that overcrowding, poor sanitation, inadequate 
transportation facilities were all parts of one big problem and that it would be 
effort wasted to try to solve one part without considering the whole. 

Many of our planning boards, however, seem to have lost sight of the purpose 
for which they were established. This doubtless is not wholly the fault of the 
planning boards but due partly, at least, to lack of sj^mpathy and support on the 
part of local officials. But while the planning board is considering minor details 
of local improvement it should keep in mind the great task for w^hich it was created : 
namely, to make a plan for the development of the municipality with special 
reference to housing, that the living conditions may be wholesome for all citizens. 
That is the ultimate aim and if the local government does not see the value of a 
comprehensive plan sufficiently to appropriate money for it, then the first duty 
of the planning board is educational work. 

Housing legislation has accomplished something toward eliminating the dark 
room, the overcrowded tenement, the unsanitary toilet, but there are still too 
many communities without even building laws. The housing problem is usually 
spoken of in connection with large cities, but rural communities may have a very 
real problem in the presence of unsanitary, crowded and poorly ventilated homes. 

A questionnaire on building and housing codes was sent to the 355 cities and 
towns in Massachusetts. Replies were received from 247 and the information 
tabulated here shows that much still remains to be done. 

There are three kinds of codes listed : — building codes which regulate materials 
of construction and give some degree of fire protection; tenement house acts which 
cover tenement houses only, but which make some provision for light and air, 
size of rooms, privacy and sanitation; and housing codes which make these pro- 
visions for all dwellings. 



34 



DEPAliTiMEXT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 



The following municipalities are reported as having building codes but copies 
were not available for analvsis: — 



Brockton. 

Holyoke. 

Lowell. 



Methuen. 

Newton. 

Pittsfield. 



One hundred sevent3'-eight municipalities report that they have passed no 
ordinance or by-law on the subject. Of these, one city, Gloucester, is at work on 
a building ordinance. 

Building Regulations in Massachusetts. 



Local Ordinance or 

giving little more tl 

Protection and Ke 

ments for Mate 


liy-law 
an Fire 
(luire- 
rials 


Local Ordinance or By-law, making some 

Provision for Light and Air, Size of Rooms, 

Privacy, Sanitation, etc. 


State Tenement House 
Act accepted i 


Attleboro. 






Andover. 


Arlington. 


Beverly. 






Boston. 


Bedford. 


Chelsea. 






Brookline^ (by-law applies to tenement houses, 


Belmont. 


Easthampton. 






more than 2 families). ^ 


Billerica. 


East Longmeadow. 




Cambridge la good ordinance, applying to all 


Braintree. 


Everett. 






dwellings). 


Concord. 


Haverhill. 






Fitchburg (all dwellings) . 


Dedham. 


Hull. 






Framingham (all dwellings). 


Hingham. 


Mansfield. 






Ludlow (tenement houses, more than 2 fam- 


Lexington. 


New Bedford. 






ilies). 


Lincoln. 


North Adams. 






Maiden. 


Lynnfield. 


Northbridge. 






Marlborough. 


Millis. 


Norwood. 






Melrose. 


Milton. 


Quincy. 






Needham (tenement houses, 2 or more fam- 


Nahant. 


Saugus. 






ilies). 


North Andover. 


Shrewsbury. 






South Hadley. 


Reading. 


Taunton. 






Springfield (tenement houses, more than 2 


Revere. 


Walt ham. 






families). 


Stoneham. 


Wilmington. 






Wellesley. 


Swampscott. 


Wo burn. 






Westfield. 
Winchester. 

Worcester (apartment houses, 3 or more apart- 
ments). 


Wakefield. 

Walpole. 

Watertown. 

Wenham. 

Weston. 

Weymouth. 

Winthrop. 



1 In towns, a tenement house is a house for more than 2 families. In cities, 2 or more families. 

2 The present Brookline building by-law is in the hands of a committee on revision. 



Town Planning Progress. 

In Massachusetts this year nine new planning boards have been established. 
Two boards reported active last year have become inactive, making the total 
number of active boards 54. 

During the year zoning ordinances or by-laws have been accepted in Brook- 
line, Milton, Newton and Winthrop. An ordinance patterned after the Springfield 
ordinance has been passed in North Adams to cover the situation until the com- 
prehensive plan, on which work is begun, can be completed. The following table 
shows what has been accomplished in zoning in Massachusetts since the passage 
of the enabling act in 1920: — 



Part L] 



HOUSING AND TOWN PLANNING. 



35 



Cities and Towns which have been zoned. 



City or Towx 



Date of Acceptance 



Brockton 
Springfield 
Winthrop . 
Brookline . 
Milton 

North Adams 
Newton 



November, 1920. 
December, 1921. 
March, 1922. 
May, 1922. 
July, 1922. 
September, 1922. 
December, 1922. 



Cities and Towns in which Zoning is in Progress. 



City or Towx 


Status of Zoning 


Boston 

Cambridge 

Dedham 

Fall River 

Gardner 

Melrose 

Milton 

Norwood 

Quincy 

Worcester 


























Ordinance being prepared. 
Ordinance in Council. 
By-law prepared. 
Ordinance prepared. 
Ordinance prepared. 
Plan prepared. 
Further zoning in progress. 
By-law prepared. 
Plans in progress. 
Plans in progress. 



Many of the zoning plans have been prepared in advance of the comprehensive 
city plan. In only one town, Walpole, has the comprehensive town plan pre- 
pared by the planning board been accepted as the official plan of the town. It is 
usually true that the importance of the comprehensive plan is in no w^ay under- 
estimated by the planning board but money to carry on the work has been lacking. 
Piece-meal planning has been the result. The ideal, however, should be kept in 
mind. The purpose of a plan is, of course, to provide for orderly, not haphazard, 
growth; to provide wholesome hving conditions; to plan ahead that what we con- 
struct to-day will not have to be thrown on the scrap-heap to-morrow. It should 
be remembered that all the details of a plan need not be carried out at once. With 
the plan once made and accepted as official, development may follow a bit at a 
time. City growth is inevitable. Orderly city growth must be planned. 

Some of our cities and towns are at work on comprehensive plans. A list fol- 
lows : — 



City or Town 


Status of Plan 


Boston 

Cambridge 

Fall River 

Gardner 

Lawrence 

Newton 

Norwood 

Springfield 

Walpole 

^^■orcester .... 


Plan under way. 

Maps and studies preparatory to city plan. 

Plan prepared. 

Plan prepared. 

Maps and studies preparatory to plan. Since these studies board 

has been inactive until this year. 
Plan prepared. 
Plan prepared. 
Plan under way. 
Plan accepted. 
Plan under way. 



36 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 



The table below shows the present status of planning boards in Massachusetts 
cities and towns. Reports from these boards have been summarized and published 
separately. 



Active Boards 


Boards never appointed 
or Inactive 


Amherst! 


Natick 


Adams 


Arlington 


Newton 


Amesbury 


Attleboro 


North Adams 


Beverly 


Bedford! 


Northampton 


Chelsea 


Belmont 


Norwood 


Chicopee 


Boston 


Plymouth 


Dan vers 


Braintree 


Quincy 


Lowell 


Brockton 


Reading! 


Lynn 


Brookline 


Somerville 


Medford 


Cambridge 


Southbridge 


Methuen 


Clinton 


Springfield 
Stoneham i 


Milford 


Dedham 


New Bedford 


Easthampton 


Stoughton ! 


Newburyport 


Everett 


Taunton 


Northbridge 


Fall River 


Wakefield 


Pea body 


Fitchburg 


Walpole! 


Pittsfield 


Framingham 


Watertown 


Revere 


Gardner 


Webster 


Salem 


Gloucester 


Wellesley ^ 


Saugus 


Greenfield 


West field 


Waltham 


Haverhill 


Weston 1 


Weymouth — 21 


Hoi yoke 


West Springfield 




Lawrence 


Winchester 




Leominster 


Winthrop 




Lexington i 


Woburn 




Maiden 


Worcester — 54 




Marlborough 






Melrose 







! Towns under 10,000 population. 



Housing Experiment at Lowell. 



The houses at Lowell have remained occupied and pajinents have gone on 
steadily this year. A statement of the money spent and the money paid back 
into the State treasury is as f ollow^s : — 



Appropriation (made in 1917) $50,000 00 

Expenses: 

Land purchased (7 acres with room for 40 houses, including also 

1 house standing on lot) $12,500 00 

Cost of 12 houses 28,128 77 

Improvements • . 2,629 77 

43,258 54 

Balance $6,741 46 

Paid back to treasury in monthly instalments: 

Interest $5,849 90 

Principal 9,348 86 

$15,198 76 

Principal remaining unpaid, December 1, 1922 ...... $27,42549 

The houses are being sold on a long-term basis and payments should be com- 
pleted in sixteen and one third years from the date of sale. 



Part L] 



THE STATE INFIRMARY. 



37 



THE STATE INFIRMARY, TEWKSBURY. 

John H. Nichols, M.D., Superintendent. 

Trustees, 
Mr. Galen L. Stone, Brookline, Chairman. 
Mrs. Nellie E. Talbot, Brookline, Secretary. 
Mrs. Mary E. Cogan, Stoneham. 
Francis W. Anthony, M.D., Haverhill. 
Mr. Dennis D. Sullivan, Middleborough. 
Mr. Walter F. Dearborn, Cambridge. 
G. Forrest Martin, M.D., Lowell. 

Numbers. 





Sane 


] 


NSANE 




Totals 


Inmates 




c 


2 


m 




a 


. 




% 


t 


c 






i 


^ 




01 


g 


1 


01 




^ 


J 




S 


^ 


§ 


H 


S 


^ 


H 


§ 


'^ 


i 


H 


Number December 1, 1921 


880 


328 


421 


1,629 


217 


508 


725 


1,097 


836 


421 


2,354 


Admitted during year 


1,598 


383 


609 


2,590 


59 


45 


104 


1,657 


428 


609 


2,694 


Discharged during the year 


1,658 


385 


592 


2,635 


57 


42 


99 


1,715 


427 


592 


2,734 


Remaining November 30, 1922 . 


820 


328 


436 


1,584 


219 


511 


730 


1,039 


839 


436 


2.314 



Number of maternity cases, 128. 

Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $2,178,337.98. 

Norrnal capacity of plant, 2,351. Value per unit of capacity, $926.55. 

Provides almshouse and hospital care of indigent persons not chargeable for 
support to any city or town. 

During the year 5,048 persons have been under care, — 3,249 males and 1,799 
females, — 124 less than in 1921, and 908 more than in 1920. The largest daily 
census was 2,600, the smallest, 2,188, the daily average being 2,337. For the pre- 
ceding year the corresponding figures were 2,492 and 2,163, with the daily average 
of 2,297. This year marks the largest average since 1915. 

Four thousand three hundred sixty cases, of which 3,016 were males and 1,344 
females, were treated in the general hospital wards. In this number were 507 
cases of pulmonary tuberculosis, 11 of diphtheria, 2 of measles, 2 of erysipelas, 
28 of whooping cough and two of scarlet fever. Of these cases in the general hos- 
pital wards 965 were discharged well, 781 relieved, 603 not relieved, 390 died 
and 1,621 were remaining in the hospital at the end of the year. Of the 424 deaths, 
390 in the general hospital department and 34 in the department for the insane, 
86 were from tuberculosis. 

Of the 507 cases of pulmonary tuberculosis in the consumptive ward, 439 cases 
were males and 68 females. Classification on admission was as follows: moderately 
advanced, 119; first stage, 31; arrested, 3; far advanced, 125. The conditions 
of patients on discharge were as follows: 146 relieved; 86 died; 32 not relieved; 
30 apparently arrested. Two hundred ten remained at end of the year. 

Sixty-four cases of other forms of tuberculosis were treated. Adding these to 
the 21 cases of tiiberculosis among the insane, a grand total of 592 cases of tuber- 
culosis have been treated, — 13 more than the previous year. 

Ninety-seven surgical operations were performed. 

Of the 128 births at this institution during the year, 61 were males and 67 were 
females. Of this number there were 123 living births, 59 males and 64 females. 
Among the mothers of these children 81 were born in the United States, 11 in 
Ireland, 20 in British Provinces and sixteen in other countries. 



:^8 DEPART:\IEXT of public welfare. [P. D. 17. 

For an account of this Department's work with mother and baby cases at this 
institution, see page 13. 

Eight luuulred seventy persons attend 44 different classes during the week. 
Two hundred children attend school, from kindergarten to high school grades, in 
addition to which are classes for the blind, manual training, sewing, phj^sical 
training, dancing, recreational and occupational classes. 

In the insane department, during the yesiv ending Septembe. 30, 1922, there 
were 838 cases under treatment, 799 insane and 39 inebriates. There was a daily 
average of 719.93 persons, — 211.11 males and 508.82 females. Of the 101 admis- 
sions, 39 were transferred from other institutions for the insane, while 25 were 
inebriates, not insane. There were 35 deaths. Of the inebriate cases, 29 were 
discharged as recovered and 10 as improved. 

With an appropriation of S852,042.35, a total of $849,853.71 was expended for 
the maintenance of this institution. Of the amount expended, $328,474.34 was 
for salaries, wages and labor; all other expenses, $521,379.37. Weeklj^ per capita 
cost of maintenance, computed on expenses less sales and refunds from mainte- 
nance, $6,953. Total receipts from all sources other than the State Treasury, 
$74,414.82. Net cost of maintenance to the Commonwealth, $775,438.89. Average 
number of officers and employees, 424. Ratio of daily average number of persons 
employed to daily average number of inmates, 1 to 5.5. The Trustees estimate 
that $918,740 will be necessary for maintenance in 1923. 

For the coming year the Trustees submit the following estimate, with a request 
for special appropriations covering the same : — 

1. Hospital extension 



Employees' quarters extension 

3. Industrial building 

4. GjTnnasium . . . . 

5. Farm buildings 

6. Water tower 



$143,636 01 
71,563 71 
72,502 40 
127,874 50 
82,283 00 
21,000 00 

$518,859 62 

ALMSHOUSE DEPARTMENT AT THE STATE FARM, BRIDGEWATER. 

Henry J. Strann, Superintendent. 

Provides almshouse care for indigent persons not chargeable to any city or 
town. 

Under chapter 199, General Acts of 1919, this institution was transferred to the 
Bureau of Prisons, now the Department of Correction, August 27, 1919. The 
data following are for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1922: — 

During the year 669 cases have been cared for. Largest daily census, 351; daily 
average, 296. 

Number of admissions during the year, 354. The total number of cases leaving 
the institution during the year, whether by death or discharge, was 423. The 
deaths numbered 63. 

LYMAN SCHOOL FOR BOYS, WESTBOROUGH. 

Charles A. Keeler, Superintendent. 
Triistees of Massachusetts Training Schools. 
Air. James W. McDonald, Alarlborough, Chairman. 
Miss IMary Josephine Bleakie, BrookUne. 
Mr. IMatthew Luce, Cohasset. 
Mr. Clarence J. AIcKenzie, Winthrop. 
Miss Amy Ethel Taylor, Lexington. 
Air. Charles M. Davenport, Boston. 
Mr. James D. Henderson, Brookline. 
Mr. Ralph A. Stewart, Brookline. 
Mr. Eugene T. Connolly, Beverly. 
Mr. Robert J. Watson, 41 Alt. Vernon Street, Boston, Executive Secretary. 



Parti.] ' LYMAN SCHOOL FOR BOYS. 39 

Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $616,562.79. Normal capacity, 460. 
Value per unit of capacity, $1,340.35. Provides custodial care and industrial 
training for delinquent boys under fifteen years of age. Cottage plan. 

During the year 1,376 cases have been under care, representing 645 separate 
individuals. This total number of cases is 117 less than in 1921 and 116 more than 
in 1920. The number in the school at the beginning of the year was 465; admis- 
sions numberer^! 911. The number of boys returned to the school this year for cause 
is 911, an increase of 453 over 1921, due largely to the industrial conditions. Dis- 
charges, 986; remainder at the close of the year, 390. The daily average number 
of inmates was 442.34 — 25 less than in 1921. The largest daily census was 482. 
The smallest daily census was 390. 

The list of causes of admission in 911 cases received during the year was as 
follows: assault, 1; breaking and entering, 87; delinquent child, 39; larceny, 
94; returned from funerals, 9; returned from visits to sick relatives, 5; returned 
from places of parole, 440; running away, 9; runaways captured, 118; returned 
from hospitals, 59; recommitted, 3; vagrancy, 1; forgery, 3; receiving stolen 
property, 1; transferred from custody of Division of Child Guardianship, 13; 
stubbornness, 22; ringing fire alarm, 1; carrying loaded revolver, 2; incest, 2; 
disturbing the peace, 1; breaking glass, 1. 

Two hundred seventy-seven of the foregoing cases were committed by the 
courts. Of this number, 223 had been arrested before, and 73 had been inmates 
of other institutions. Thirty-eight, or 14 per cent, were of American parentage; 
171, or 62 per cent, were of foreign parentage; and 18, or 6 per cent, were of unknown 
parentage. Thirty-one of the boys were foreign born, while 244 were born in the 
United States. 

Of tl3 new commitments this year, 30 boys were eleven years of age and 29 
under e ;ven. These young boys are taken care of in two cottages, one seven and 
the otl r three miles from the main school. They do not mingle with the older 
boys. 

The average length of stay in Lyman School of boys paroled for the first time 
during the year ending November 30, 1922, was 11.53 months. 

Of the 986 cases discharged or released during the year, 478 were released on 
parole to parents and relatives; on parole to others than relatives, 145; boarded 
out, 138; runaways, 124; sent to hospitals, 64; turned over to police, 1; trans- 
ferred to other institutions, 21; released to visit sick relatives, 7; released to 
funerals, 8. 

With an appropriation of $221,025, a total of $221,020.70 was expended for the 
maintenance of this institution. Of the amount expended, $94,912.89 was for 
salaries, wages and labor; all other expenses, $126,107.81. Weekly per capita 
cost of maintenance, computed on expenses less sales and refunds from mainte- 
nance, $9.58. Total receipts from all sources other than the State treasury, $167.59. 
Net cost of maintenance to the Commonwealth, $220,853.11. Daily average num- 
ber of officers and employees, 106. Ratio of daily average number of persons 
employed to daily average number of inmates, 1 to 4.1. The Trustees estimate 
that $251,834 will be necessary for maintenance in 1923. 

The boys spend one-half of each day in some educational work which will be of 
service to them when they leave the school. The carpentry class teaches sufficient 
knowledge of carpentry so that many have left the school to work with building 
and manufacturing firms. The printing class issues a school paper regularly. 
The shoe department manufactures all the shoes and slippers for the school and for 
the Industrial School for Boys. 

For the coming year the Trustees submit the following estimate, with request 
for a special appropriation covering the same : — 

Chapel and assembly building, with furnishings and equipment; for service 
connections to school building; and for rearranging partitions in school 
building to provide more schoolrooms ....... S45,000 00 



40 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 

INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, SHIRLEY. 

Geokge p. Campbell, Superintendent. 

Trustees of the Massachusetts Training Schools. 

Total valuation of plant, real and personal, 8587,182.08. Normal capacitj^ of 
plant, 280. Value per unit of capacity, $2,097.08. 

Provides custodial care and industrial training for boj^s over fifteen and under 
twenty-one years of age. Only boys under eighteen may be admitted. 

During the year 689 cases have been cared for, representing 661 separate in- 
di\iduals. This total number of cases is 10 less than in the preceding j^ar. The 
number in the school at the beginning of the j'ear was 317. Admissions numbered 
372; discharges, 459; remainder at the close of the year, 230. The largest daily 
census was 317; the smallest, 231; daily average, 277.75. 

The list of causes of admission for 273 commitments of the 372 cases received 
during the 3'ear was as follows: assault, 4; assault and battery, 7; breaking and 
entering, 31; breaking and entering and larcenj^, 45; forgery or uttering, 3; idle 
and disorderly, 1; incest and other sex cases, 9; ringing in false alarm of fire, 2; 
gambling, 1; larcen}^ 78; stubborn, disobedient and delinquent, 40; unlawful 
use of automobile, 11; vagrancy, 4; receiving stolen property, 2; carrying revolver 
or other dangerous weapon, 3; drunkenness, 1; not determined, transfers, etc., 
22; runawa3's, 9. 

Two hundred fifty-five of the foregoing cases were committed by the courts, and 
18 were transferred from Lyman School for Boj's. Of the boys thus committed, 202 
had been in court before, and 78 had been inmates of other institutions. Twenty- 
six, or 9.5 per cent, were foreign born; 247, or 90.5 per cent, were born in the United 
States. Forty-five were of American parentage, 141 of foreign parentage and 24 
were of unknown parentage. The average length of stay in this Industrial School, 
of bo\'s paroled for the first time, was 10 and one-half months. The average popu- 
lation of 277.75 was less than the average of the preceding year by 10.48. 

Most of these boys are well developed physicall}^, and need much work to take 
care of their surplus energy. The offences for which man}^ of them are committed 
are very serious, and require a strenuous effort to keep the boys from developing 
into criminals. The boj^s do a great part of the work about the large farm, and 
supply the greater part of all the food used in the school. 

Of the 459 boys discharged or released during the 3'ear, 310 were paroled; re- 
turned paroles placed out, 105; transferred to Massachusetts Reformatorj^, 6; 
transferred to State Farm, 2; transferred to other institutions, not penal, 2; re- 
turned to court, over age, 1; absent without leave 32; died as result of accident, 1. 

Although no formal mental tests are given, the number of definitely feeble- 
minded boj's is still probably on the increase. \\Tiereas in 1921 there were 9% of 
the boys doing fourth grade work or less, this j^ear we have 20% in these classes. 
Many of them are nearly as much retarded in physical as in mental growth. Last 
3'ear attention was called to the large number of boys, — about 33^% of the whole 
school — who had had previous institutional training. This has fallen to 23% 
which is a matter for some congratulation, inasmuch as the influence of this tj^pe 
of boy makes work with new comers much more difficult. 

Out of an appropriation of $145,369.72, a total of 3143,074.36 was expended 
for the maintenance of this institution. Of this amount expended, $58,483.36 was 
for salaries, wages and labor; all other expenses, $84,591.00. Weekly per capita 
cost of maintenance, computed on expenses less sales and refunds from mainte- 
nance, 89.796. Total receipts from all sources other than the State treasury, 
$1,301.30. Xet cost of maintenance to the Commonwealth, $141,773.06. Daily 
average number of officers and employees, 71. Ratio of daily average number of 
persons employed to daily average number of inmates, 1 to 3.9. The trustees esti- 
mate that $161,391.50 will be necessary for maintenance in 1923. 



Part L] INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS. 41 

For the coming year, the trustees submit the following estimate, with request 
for a special appropriation covering the same : — 

1. Moving and relocating Cottage No. 4 to make room for playground, rebuild- 

ing the basement, and service connections ...... S6,500 00 

2. Materials for rebuilding the barn for hay storage and horses . . . 7,000 00 

$13,500 00 

STATE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, LANCASTER. 

Cathaeixe M. Campbell, Superintendent. 
Trustees of Massachusetts Training Schools. 

Total valuation of plant, real and personal, 8475,319.08. Normal capacity of 
plant, 268. Value per unit of capacity, $1,773.57. Founded in 1854 as a private 
institution. Taken over by the State in 1856. 

Provides custodial care and industrial training for delinquent girls under seven- 
teen 3'ears of age at time of commitment. 

During the year 523 girls have been under care. This total is 2 more than in 
1921. The number in the school at the beginning of the year was 285; admis- 
sions during the vear, 238; discharged, including all persons going out of the school, 
251; remaining November 30, 1922, 272. 

The largest daily census was 304; smallest, 271; daily average, 292. 

The list of causes of admission for 121 commitments of the 238 cases received 
at the school during the year was as follows: adulter}', 1; being a runaway, 8; 
delinquent, 21; fornication, 8; idle and disorderly, 5; larceny, 11; lewdness, 8; 
stubbornness, 54; wayward child, 3; leading an idle, vagrant and \4cious life, 1; 
night walking, 1. 

Recalled to the school, 117, — for a visit to the school, 24; from hospital, 7; 
for further training, 10; for larceny, 2; for running away from school, 12; for 
running away from home, 5; from a visit home, 5; for discipline, 2; too feeble- 
minded to place, 2; for being immoral while a runaway, 17; for immoral conduct, 
14; because in danger of immoral conduct, 1; for running away from place, 7; 
because unsatisfactory in place, 5; for treatment, 4. 

Of the 251 girls discharged or released during the year, 52 were released on 
parole to parents and relatives; on parole to other families for wages, 112; on 
parole to other families to attend school, earning wages, 15; from a \dsit to the 
school, 23; for a visit, 5; ran away from Industrial School, 11; transferred to 
hospitals, 28; transferred to Reformatory for Women, 3; transferred to Monson 
State Hospital, 1; to be deported, 1. 

The average length of sta}" in the school of all girls paroled for the first time dur- 
ing the year ending November 30, 1922, was two years and two days. The longer 
period of training as compared with that in the boj^s' schools enables the super- 
intendent to know the inmates better; gives an opportunity for more efficient 
training and increases the pupil's chances of making good on parole. 

Many of the girls are not normal mentalh% and for that reason are not proper 
» subjects for this school. It is a very difficult thing to transfer these girls elsewhere. 

The more backward girls live for the most part in a separate cottage a few miles 
from the main school, and are given training best suited to their particular needs. 
This separation within the institution must continue, pending the tune when proper 
classifications can be effected before commitment. 

With an appropriation of 8148,590.42, a total of $144,158.84 was expended for 
the maintenance of this institution. Of the amount expended, 856,593.23 was 
for salaries, wages and labor; all other expenses, 887,565.61. Weekly per capita 
cost of maintenance, computed on expenses less sales and refunds from mainte- 
nance, 89.432. Total receipts from all sources other than the State treasury, 
$535.33. Net cost of maintenance to the Commonwealth, $143,623.51. Daily 
average number of officers and employees, 75. Ratio of dail}^ average number of 
persons employed to daily average number of inmates, 1 to 3.9. The trustees 
estimate that $151,392 will be necessary for maintenance in 1923. 



42 DEPART.MENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 

MASSACHUSETTS HOSPITAL SCHOOL, CANTON. 

John E. Fish, M.D., Superintendent. 

Trustees. 
Edward H. Bradford, jM.D., Boston, Chairman. 
Mr. Leonard W. Ross, Mattapan, Secretary. 
Mr. Walter C. Baylies, Taunton. 
Mr. William F. Fitzgerald, Brookline. 
Mr. Andrew Marshall, Boston. 

Opened December 1, 1907. Total valuation of plant, real and personal, 
8630,938.85. Normal capacitj^ of plant, 402. Value per unit of capacity, $1 ,569.49. 

Provides care and schooling for crippled and deformed children. Crippled and 
deformed children of the Commonwealth between ages of five and fifteen, and 
mentally competent to attend the public schools, are eligible for admission. 

There Avere 397 cases under care during the year. This total is 43 more than 
in 1921. ^ ^ 

On December 1, 1921, there were 283 children, namely, 155 boys and 128 girls, 
in the school. One hundred fourteen were admitted and 102 discharged during 
the year. The maximum number at any one time was 304, the minimum, 190, 
and the daily average, 269.94, — a decrease of 9.68 from the preceding year. 
Two hundred ninety-five remained in residence at the close of the year. 

The training of the average cripple is necessarily protracted, and should com- 
mence as early as possible. Furthermore, the influences which surround a crip- 
pled child at home are not helpful to a feeling of independence, and the work of 
education should begin at a time when these harmful influences have done the 
least evil. The girls are taught cooking, sewing, general housework, laundering 
and similar domestic arts as a routine course for all, while a few selected cases are 
assigned to office work, the telephone desk, typewriting, etc. Farming, garden- 
ing, the care of poultry, work in the dairy, an apprenticeship with the baker, 
engineer, carpenter, painter, storeman, tailor, cobbler, chauffeur and other neces- 
sary emplo3^ees, afford educational opportunities of value to many of the older 
boys. 

Sixtj^-one per cent of the discharged cases are able to maintain creditable stand- 
ing in other schools or are successful wage earners. Many graduates enter public 
high schools without conditions, and a few have obtained such a grasp of scholar- 
ship as to give promise of becoming men and women of broad culture. It is obvious 
that heredity and environment are as influential in the progress of the cripple as 
in the progress of children without physcial handicap, and that the scholastic 
work of the school has been notably successful is shown b}^ the record of its gradu- 
ates. This success is largely due to the sympathetic prompting to perseverance 
given b}' the teachers when without encouragement children fighting against heavy 
odds would have given up disheartened. 

A few years ago it was planned to organize a department for the care of approxi- 
mately 300 sick state minor wards on the grounds of the school and in Chapter 
597, Acts of 1920, authoritj^ was given the trustees of the school to construct from 
time to time, as appropriations are made by the general court, suitable buildings 
for the hospital care and treatment of such state minor wards as may be assigned 
to their care by the Department of Public W^elfare. 

Since that time, §215,000 has been appropriated, S15,000 for purchase of land 
and 8200,000 for a hospital with 100 beds. 

Contracts were let for the new hospital building and it was completed for occu- 
pancy on October 16, 1922, and formally dedicated the ''Bradford Infirmary". 

In the opinion of the trustees the demand made upon the institution by the sick 
children at the new infirmary, cannot be met except for a brief period of a few 
months unless legislative provision is made for the increased accommodations for 



PartL] SUPERVISION OF INSTITUTIONS. 43 

nurses and greater heating and laundry facilities: the trustees therefore submit 
the following estimates, with request for a special appropriation covering the 
same : — 

1. Remodelling first floor of old infirmary to accommodate additional nurses and 

employees $10,000 00 

2. Enlarging power plant for boilers and extending laundry, with necessary 

equipment for same .......... 44,335 00 

3. Two fireproof cottages for convalescent minor wards (thirty beds each) . . 65,000 00 

4. Shed for farm implements and enlarging garage ...... 5,000 00 

$124,335 00 

Out of an appropriation of $156,551.25, a total of $143,452.22 was expended 
for the maintenance of this institution. Of the amount expended, $73,080.79 
was for salaries, wages and labor; all other expenses, $70,371.43. Weekly per 
capita cost of maintenance, computed on expenses less sales and refunds from 
maintenance, $10,167. Total receipts from all sources other than the State treasury, 
$44,751.08. Net cost of maintenance to the Commonwealth, $98,701.14. Daily 
average number of officers and employees, 91. Ratio of daily average number of 
persons employed to daily average number of inmates, 1 to 2.9. The trustees 
estimate the sum of $181,468 for maintenance in 1923. 

SUPERVISION OF INSTITUTIONS. 

The Department, in its supervision over the five institutions, has always in- 
sisted upon the fact that these institutions exist for the benefit of their inmates. 
In its inspections the proper care of the inmates has been the first consideration. 
Housing, food and its preparation, clothing, medical care, employment, training 
and healthful recreation are carefully watched. 

Each of the five institutions is an integral part of one of the divisions of the 
Department and is used by that division for its special needs under the guidance 
of departmental policy. As the work of each institution is closely connected with 
the work of the various municipalities and the private charitable agencies, the 
departmental policy binds together a comprehensive and complete program for all 
activities dealing with Public Welfare. 

In the matter of financial supervision the Department examines and analyzes 
institution expenditures, keeping constantly in mind the function of the institu- 
tion and the relation of its business to the care, education, and welfare of the 
inmates. Monthly analysis is made of articles of food, coal, hay and grain pur- 
chased, and tabulated results are sent to each institution. In addition, sundry 
tabulations covering the year's operations have been prepared. The Department 
has co-operated with the several institutions in bringing about the joint purchasing 
of supplies, resulting in regular conferences upon matters of common interest. 

Capacity, Population and Inventory. 

The following tables are designed to show in detail the financial condition of 
each institution. A convenient summary of the State's property represented by 
each institution is followed by a comparison of all appropriations and the expen- 
ditures made therefrom. 



44 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 



Table I. — Part I. — Capacities and Population of the Five Institutions for the Fiscal 
Year ending November 30, 1922. 



INSTITUTIONS 


Normal 
Capacity 


Largest 
Number 
present 

at 

Any One 

Time 


Smallest 
Number 
present 

at 

Any One 

Time 


Daily 
Average 
Number 
present 
during 
the Year 
1922 


Daily 
Average 
Number 
present 

during 

the Year 

1921 


Daily 
Average 
Number 
pre.«ent 
during 
the Year 
1920 


State Infirmary 

Lyman School for Boys .... 
Industrial School for Boys .... 
Industrial School for Girls .... 
Massachusetts Hospital School 


2,351 
460 
280 
268 
402 


2,600 
482 
317 
304 
304 


2,188 
390 
231 
271 
190 


2,337 
442 
277 
292 
270 


2.297 
467 
288 
303 
279 


1.979 
438 
221 
334 
274 


Totals 


3.761 


4,007 


3,270 


3,618 


3.634 


3,246 



T.\BLE I. — Part II. 



Inventory of the Five Ijisiituiions, November 30, 1922. 





Real and Personal Estate 


INSTITUTIONS 


Land 


Buildings 


Personal 
Property 


Total 




Acres 


Value 


Value 


State Infirmary .... 
Lyman School for Boys 
Industrial School for Boys . 
Industrial School for Girls 
Massachusetts Hospital School 


794.00 
453.25 
890.00 
269.00 
165.72 


S71,517 50 
42,073 17 
27,335 00 
14,355 00 
28,042 25 


Sl,711,227 74 
416.631 25 
444,434 13 
373,404 16 
497,163 04 


§395,592 74 

157,858 37 

115,412 95 

87,559 92 

105,733 56 


82,178.337 98 
616.562 791 
587.182 08 
475.319 08 
630.938 85 


Totals 


2,571.97 


§183,322 92 


$3,442,860 32 


S862,157 54 


$4,488,340 78 



1 Included in above amount are land and buildings amounting to $14,806.25, purchased with private trust 
funds. 



II. Receipts. 

Table II is designed to show every item of income to each institution from 
whatever source, for whatever purpose, excepting certain private funds, casting 
all together for ready comparison. The tabulation also shows such of the receipts 
as under the law are available for maintenance purposes in 1923. According to 
this table the total receipts from all sources were $1,980,403.83. Of this amount, 
SI, 859,233. 71 was received from the State treasury, and the remainder, S121,- 
170.12, came in on account of the institution, through board of patients, sale of 
products or otherwise. Of this latter figure, $44,751.08 is available for mainte- 
nance purposes in 1923. 



SUPERVISION OF INSTITUTIONS. 



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46 DEPART:\IEXT of public welfare. [P. D. 17. 



III. Expenditures. 

Table III, divided into three parts, shows all expenditures of whatever nature 
on account of the several institutions. Part I deals with maintenance only. Part 
II exhibits outlays for special purposes, divided into four headings, namely, ''land," 
"buildings," "furnishing and equipping," and "miscellaneous." Part III sum- 
marizes Parts I and II, and adds thereto the amounts expended from trust funds 
held by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth. 

The table shows that $1,501,559.83 was spent for maintenance, exclusive of 
ex])enditures for special purposes mentioned in Part II, which amounted to 
$356,765.47. 

In addition to the expenditures as above indicated, two institutions — Lyman 
School for Boys and the Industrial School for Girls — have private trust funds 
which are administered for the benefit of inmates, but independently of the State's 
investment. The custody of each is vested in the State Treasurer, whose duty 
it is to invest the same and to pay therefrom at the request of the trustees. Three 
of these trusts — the Lyman fund, the Lyman trust fund and the Lamb fund — 
apply to Lj^man School for Boys, while the Fay, the Mary Lamb and the Rogers 
book fund pertain to the Industrial School for Girls. From these sources a total 
of $908.41 was expended during the year of which $70 was from the Fay fund, 
S34.50 from the Rogers book fund, and $803.91 from the Ljnnan Trust fund. 
By adding to the amounts given ($908.41) for trust funds, as shown in Part III, 
we find a grand total of $1,859,233.71 expended on account of the five institutions. 



SUPERVISION OF L\STITUTIONS. 



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48 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 



Table III. — Part II. 



-Expenditures of the Five Institutions for the Fiscal Year 
ending November 30, 1922 — Continued. 





FoK Special Purposes 


INSTITUTIONS 


Land 


Buildings 


Furnishing 

and 
equipping 


Miscella- 
neous 


Total 


State Infirmary 

Lyman School for Boys 

Iiulustrial School for Boys .... 
Industrial School for Girls .... 
Massachusetts Hospital School 


$525 00 


S106.766 61 
34,062 31 
61,749 11 

139,187 14 


S14,475 30 




$106,766 61 

34,062 31 

61,749 11 

14,475 30 

139,712 14 


Totals 


$525 00 


$341,765 17 


$14,475 30 


- 


$356,765 47 



Table III. — Part III. — Summary of Expenditures for the Fiscal Year ending 
November 30, 1922 — Concluded. 



INSTITUTIONS 


Maintenance 


Special 
Purposes 


Trust Funds 


Total 


State Infirmary 

Lyman School for Boys 

Industrial School for Boys 

Industrial School for Girls 

Massachusetts Hospital School .... 


$849,853 71 
221,020 70 
143.074 36 
144,158 84 
143,452 22 


$106,766 61 

34.062 31 

61.749 11 

14,475 30 

139,712 14 


$803 91 
104 50 


$956,620 32 
255,886 92 
204,823 47 
158,738 64 
283,164 36 


Totals 


$1,501,559 83 


$356,765 47 


$908 41 


$1,859,233 71 



IV. Per Capita Cost. 

Table IV shows for each of the five institutions the total cost of maintenance. 
It further shows all receipts from sales or refunds ; the difference, which is the net 
cost to the institutions; and the average net weekly per capita cost to the insti- 
tution, with a column showing the corresponding per capita for the three-year 
period just ended. 



SUPERVISION OF INSTITUTIONS. 



49 



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50 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 



a a c ^ 



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For 
the Three 

Years 
1919, 1920 
and 1921 


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Years 
1919, 1920 
and 1921 


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3.330 
3.834 
3 096 
4.128 




a 


$2,669 
3.780 
3.846 
3.692 
4.798 




i 


$2,695 
4 115 
4.039 
3.717 
5.192 






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For 
the Three 

Years 
1919,1920 
and 1921 


$64,819 
66.775 
67.362 
61.634 
65,196 





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73.792 
69.812 
66.909 
71.475 


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s 


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$74,837 
74.263 
70.620 
65.697 
72.141 




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the Three 

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1919,1920 
and 1921 


337.290 
98.676 
63.627 
72.302 
74.341 


to 

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to 

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359.773 
104.041 
69.011 

72.816 
81.573 


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365.767 
106.506 
69.038 
71.795 
84.418 


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State Infirmary 

Lyman School for Boys 

Industrial School for Boys .... 
Industrial School for Girls .... 
Massachusetts Hospital School 


c3 

I 



Parti.] COUNTY TRAINING SCHOOLS. 51 



THE COUNTY TRAINING SCHOOLS. 

Under the provisions of General Laws, chapter 77, section 2, the five county- 
training schools for truants and habitual school offenders are subject to the visita- 
tion of this Department, which is required to report thereon in its annual report. 
The schools are as follows : — 

Essex County Training School, Lawrence. 
Hampden County Training School, Springfield. 
Middlesex County Training School, North Chelmsford. 
Norfolk, Bristol and Plymouth Union Training School, Walpole. 
Worcester County Training School, Oakdale (West Boylston). 

The accompanying table shows the numbers and the movement of the popula- 
tion in these institutions for the fiscal year ending December 31, 1922, and also 
the average weekly per capita cost of maintenance, subtracting all receipts from 
private sources. 

As will be seen from the table there were 515 children in the five schools during 
1922. The year opened with 354. In the succeeding twelve months 161 were ad- 
mitted and 219 were discharged, leaving 296 in residence at the close of the year. 
This figure is 58 less than the corresponding number for 1921. 

The average age of the children at the time of their admittance was thirteen 
years, one month and three dsivs. Every child must be discharged, by requirement 
of the statute, upon reaching the age of sixteen. 



52 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 1 





Average 
Weekly 
Per Cap- 
ita Cost 
of main- 
taining 
Schoola 


$8 81 
10 62 

10 60 

11 80 
4 83 














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Part L 



SUPERVISION OF SETTLED POOR. 



53 



SUPERVISION OF THE SETTLED POOR RELIEVED OR SUPPORTED 
BY CITIES AND TOWNS. 

The City and Town Poor. 

Under General Laws, chapter 117, sections 3, 36, 37, and 38, and chapter 121, 
section 16, the department is required to visit all places where poor persons are 
supported in families by cities and towns and all children who are supported by 
cities and towns. Children illegally retained in city or town almshouses must be 
removed therefrom and placed at board at the expense of the city or town con- 
cerned. 

The Settled Adult Poor provided for ix Families. 

Of the 240 adult poor persons reported by local authorities as fully supported 
in families on January 1, 1922, 12 had died and 7 had been removed before visits 
could be made. The remaining 221, — 91 men and 130 women — were all visited 
and reported on by the Department's agents. They were supported by 114 cities 
and towns as follows : — 



Acton . 


1 


Great Barrington 




4 


Pittsfield 


1 


Adams . 


1 


Groton 




2 


Plainville 


2 


Arlington 


4 


Hadley 






1 


Provincetown 


1 


Ashland 


3 


Hamilton 






1 


Quincy 


3 


Athol . 


1 


Hardwick 






2 


Randolph 


1 


Attleboro 


2 


Hawley 






1 


Raj-nham 


1 


Belmont 


1 


Hingham 






1 


Reading 


1 


Berlin . 


1 


Hinsdale 






3 


Rehoboth 


2 


Bolton . 


1 


Holbrook 






2 


Revere 


7 


Braintree 


7 


Hopedale 






2 


Rochester 


1 


Brewster 


3 


Hopkinton 






1 


Rovalston 


2 


Burlington 


1 


Huntington 






2 


Russell 


1 


Carlisle 


1 


Kingston 






1 


Salisbury 


1 


Charlemont . 


1 


Lanesborougl 






3 


Sandwich 


1 


Charlton 


1 


Lawrence 






5 


Sharon 


1 


Chatham 


4 


Littleton 






2 


Sheffield 


4 


Cheshire 


1 


Lowell . 






1 


Southwick 


1 


Chicopee 


2 


Marion 






1 


Sterling 


2 


Clarksburg . 


1 


Marlborough 






2 


Stow . 


2 


Colrain 


2 


Medfield 






2 


Templeton . 


2 


Cummington 


1 


Melrose 






2 


Topsfield 


1 


Dalton 


2 


Mendon 






1 


Wales . 


1 


Danvers 


5 


Merrimac 






4 


Walt ham 


2 


Dedham 


1 


Milh-iUe 






1 


Watertown . 


6 


Deerfield 


1 


Needham 






3 


Wellfleet 


1 


Dighton 


3 


Newbury 






2 


West Springfield . 


2 


Dracut 


1 


Newburyport 




1 


West Stockbridge . 


1 


Dudley 


2 


North Adams 




2 


West Tisbury 


1 


East Longmeadow 


1 


Northampton 




1 


Weymouth . 


3 


Edgartown . 


4 


North borough 




4 


Whitman 


7 


Enfield 


2 


Northfield 




1 


Winchester . 


3 


Everett 


3 


Norfolk 






2 


Winthrop 


2 


Falmouth 


1 


Oak Bluffs 






1 


Wellesley 


1 


Fitchburg 


1 


Orange 






2 


Wej-mouth . 


3 


Foxborough . 


3 


Orleans 






1 


Wo burn 


5 


Gardner 


2 


Otis 






1 


Yarmouth 


1 


Gill . 


1 


Pelham 






1 






Granby 


1 


Petersham 






1 







Their ages were as follows: three between 20 and 30; two between 30 and 40; 
sixteen between 40 and 50; eighteen between 50 and 60; fifty-eight between 60 
and 70; sixty-five between 70 and 80 ; forty-nine between 80 and 90; eight between 
90 and 100; one over 100. For their support they were paid in 3 cases under S2 
per week; in 3 cases from S2 to S3 per week; in 22 cases from S3 to S4 per week; 
and in 194 cases, — mostly of old and feeble persons — the rate varied from S4 
to SIS per week according to the amount of care required. Of the whole number 



54 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 



53^^ were reported to be in good or fairly good physical condition and 82% in good 
mental condition. In all but nine cases, or 3%, the}^ were apparentl}^ receiving 
good care. There were 86 able to do light work either in the house or about the 
premises. There were 7 supported in their own homes. In 102 cases, according 
to the reports, the overseers of the poor complied with the law requiring them to 
visit these persons at least once in every six months. In 8 cases they made one 
visit a year; in 12 cases four visits; in 5 cases, three visits; in one case twelve 
visits and in 64 cases occasional visits were made. In the remaining 29 cases no 
record of visits was found. 



Dependent Minor Children with Settlement provided for in Almshouses. 

Visits were made in the cases of 109 children — 47 boys and 62 girls — reported 
to be cared for by the following cities and towns in their almshouses : — 



Boston 


. 57 


Lawrence . 


4 


Somerset . 


1 


Cambridge 


3 


Lowell 


3 


Springfield 


6 


Easthampton 


3 


New Bedford 


2 


Warren 


1 


Fall River . 


. 12 


Oxford 


1 


Westford . 


1 


Greenfield . 


3 


Quincy 


4 


Wo burn 


1 


Holyoke . 


2 


Saugus 


1 


Worcester . 


4 



In addition to this number, 58 had been removed from the almshouse before 
the time of visitation. Of the number visited, 51 were so defective in mind or body 
as to make their retention in the almshouse desirable. 



Dependent Minor Children with Settlement provided for Outside of 

Almshouses. 

As sho-uTi by the Department's visitation of the 1,037 children reported by the 
local authorities as full}^ supported outside the almshouses on January 1, 1922, 
and on July 1, 1922, one had died and 86 had been removed before visits could 
be made. The remaining 950, — 525 boys and 425 girls — were supported by 
88 cities and towns as follows : — 



Abington . 




1 


Fairhaven . 


1 


Oxford 






1 


Adams 




3 


Fall River 


1 


Quincy 






8 


Andover 




3 


Fitchburg . 


4 


Randolph 






2 


Arlington . 




4 


Framingham 


5 


Raynham 






4 


Attleboro . 




6 


Gardner . 


3 


Reading 






1 


Barnstable 




1 


Gloucester 


4 


Rockland 






6 


Barre 




4 


Grafton 


1 


Royalston 






2 


Beverly 




5 


HarT\-ich . 


1 


Rutland 






1 


Boston 




501 


Hawley 


2 


Salem 






5 


Bourne 




5 


Hopkinton 


3 


Sharon 






2 


Braintree . 




3 


Lawrence . 


21 


Somerville 




23 


Brewster . 




3 


Leominster 


4 


Southbridge 




10 


Brockton . 




17 


Littleton . 


1 


Sutton 




3 


Brookline . 




16 


Ludlow 


2 


Townsend . 




3 


Cambridge 




22 


Lynn 


13 


Wakefield . 




2 


Chelsea 




8 


Maiden . 


2 


Waltham . 




3 


Chicopee . 




5 


Mansfield . 


2 


Wareham . 




3 


Clarksburg 




2 


Marblehead 


1 


Warren 




2 


Clinton 




2 


Maynard . 


5 


Watertown 




18 


Colrain 




1 


Methuen . 


2 


Webster . 




3 


Concord 




3 


MUford . 


1 


Wellfleet . 




1 


Conway 




1 


Millbury . 


2 


West Springfield 




7 


Dartmouth 




3 


Milh-ille . 


1 


Westfield . 




8 


Dedham . 




6 


Montague . 


1 


Weymouth 




2 


Deerfield . 




5 


Nantucket 


1 


Wliitman . 




2 


Dighton 




5 


Natick 


2 


Winchester 




2 


East Longmeado 


w 


2 


Needham . 


3 


Winthrop . 




2 


Easton 




1 


New Bedford 


49 


Worcester . 




42 


Essex 




1 


Norfolk . 


3 




Everett 




1 


Nor well 


1 











PartL] LAWS AFFECTING THE DEPARTMENT, 55 

Of the whole number 73 were cared for and treated in pubHc and private hos- 
pitals and asylums. There were 738 who attended school, and 232 who did more 
or less work. Of the whole number, 874 were in good or fairly good physical con- 
dition, and 906 in good or fairly good mental condition. The price of board varied 
from $1.50 to $6.00 per week. These children were found to be well cared for with 
a few exceptions, which have been brought to the attention of the local overseers. 

The Penalty incurred by Certain Cities and Towns for Failure to make 
THEIR Returns for Poor Relief during the Month of April, 1922. 

Under Sections 32-35 of Chapter 117 of the General Laws, the Department re- 
ported to the Treasurer of the Commonwealth the names of the cities and towns 
that failed to make their pauper returns during the month of April, 1922, together 
with the amount of penalty incurred in each instance as follows: Acton, $22; 
Ayer, $44; Belchertown, $8; Blandford, $9; Brewster, $7; Burhngton, $9; 
Charlton, $8; Cheshire, $7; Chilmark, $8; Deerfield, $1; Easton, $192; Edgar- 
town, $7; Enfield, $8; Franklin, $46; Freetown, $25; Gardner, $130; Hanover, 
$10; Hawley, $12; Hull, $2- Lee, $1; Lenox, $14; Leverett, $1; Lowell, $7; 
Lynn, $16; Marion, $8; Millville, $1; New Braintree, $8; Norton, $31; Nor- 
wood, $281; Oak Bluffs, $8; Savoy, $7; Scituate, $7; Seekonk, $31; Shrews- 
bury, $30; Southwick, $1; Stockbridge, $15; Sudbury, $10; Sutton, $1; Swan- 
sea, $22; Wareham, $1; Washington, $11; Wilbraham, $31; Woburn, $17; 
Webster, $1; Westport, $1. 

LAWS AFFECTING THE DEPARTMENT, PASSED BY THE LEGISLA- 
TURE OF 1922. 

Chapter 376 of the Acts of 1922 raises the age of dependent children under the 
Mothers' Aid law from fourteen to sixteen, when children are required to attend 
school. Chapter 231, Acts of 1922, allows school committees to prevent the place- 
ment in their towns of certain mentally retarded children. Chapter 535, Acts of 
1922 (which will not be printed here on account of its length), provides for the 
establishment, at any institution under the supervision of the Department of Cor- 
rection, of departments for drug addicts for the care and treatment of persons ad- 
dicted to the intemperate use of stimulants or narcotics. Chapter 177 and Chapter 
479 of the Acts of 1922 make minor changes in the settlement laws. Chapter 13 
and Chapter 232 of the Acts of 1922, and Chapter 52 of the Resolves of 1922, 
relate to special commissions of which the Commissioner of Public Welfare was 
designated as a member. Chapter 306, Acts of 1922, allows the Trustees of the 
Massachusetts Hospital School to receive funds in trust for inmates, former in- 
mates, and graduates of the School. 

Chapter 13. 

An Act constituting a Special Commission to provide for clearing the Woods 
OF THE Metropolitan Parks of Fallen Trees and Broken Limbs and 
Branches, and making an Appropriation therefor. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. The commissioner of the metropolitan district commission, the commis- 
sioner of conservation, the commissioner of public welfare, the state commander of 
The American Legion and a person designated by the governor, who shall be the chair- 
man of the Massachusetts committee to promote work, are hereby constituted a special 
commission for the purpose of clearing the forests of the metropolitan parks of fallen 
trees and broken limbs and branches. It may employ such persons as may be necessary 
for said purposes and fix their compensation. The work hereby authorized shall be 
done under the immediate supervision of the metropolitan districtcommission. Persons 
employed hereunder shall not be subject to civil service laws or the rules and regula- 
tions made thereunder, except that only American citizens shall be employed by said 
special commission. The members of said special commission shall serve without com- 



50 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 

I^ensation and shall continue in office until the first of December in the current j-ear, 
unless sooner relieved of duty In- the governor. 

Section 2. To provide for the expenditures herein authorized there is hereby 
appropriated the sum of fifty thousand dollars, of which twenty-five thousand dollars 
shall lx» paid from the general fund or ordinary revenue of the commonwealth, and 
twenty-five thousand dollars shall be paid from the IMetropolitan Parks Maintenance 
Fund and be assessed upon the cities and towns of the metropolitan parks district, in 
accordance with the law relative to assessments for the maintenance of metropolitan 
parks. 

Section 3. This act shall take effect upon its passage. [Approved February 3, 

Chapter 52. 

RESOL^'E MAKING PROVISION FOR AN INVESTIGATION AS TO THE DeSIRABIUTY OF PRO- 
VIDING FOR THE Aid of Certain Physically Handicapped Persons other than 
THE Blind, and for their Tempor.^ry Relief during the Current Year. 

Resolved, That a special commission is hereby established, to consist of the commis- 
sioner of public welfare, the chairman of the industrial accident board, the director 
of the commission for the blind and the director of vocational education, which shall 
investigate and report to the general court, not later than the second Wednesday in 
January, nineteen hundred and twenty-three, as to the desirability of providing by 
law for the relief of physically handicapped persons other than the blind. Such report 
shall include drafts of such legislation as may be recommended. The commission shall 
serve without compensation, and may expend from any appropriation made for the 
purpose such sums as may be approved by the governor and council. 

For the purpose of furnishing aid during the current year, in accordance with this 
paragraph, to any needy wheelchair cripple, or other needy physicalh- handicapped 
person, other than a blind person, the commissioner of public welfare, subject to such 
regulations as may be adopted by the special commission established hereunder, may 
expend such sum not exceeding ten thousand dollars as may be appropriated. Such 
aid shall be allowed only upon application and to such persons as, in the opinion of 
the commissioner of public welfare, are permanently disabled to such an extent that 
they are unable through their own efforts to contribute to their own support, and in 
amounts not in excess of ten dollars a week; provided, however, that the commis- 
sioner shall not undertake the permanent maintenance of any such person; and pro- 
vided, further, that no insane person, or person who has not become physically 
handicapped while residing in this commonwealth or who shall not have resided in this 
commonwealth for at least five consecutive years, shall receive any such aid. [Approved 
June 13, 1922. 

Chapter 177. 

An Act relath-e to the Acquisition of Settlements by Soldiers and Sailors. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section one of chapter one hundred and sixteen of the General Laws is hereby 
amended by striking out all after the word ''town" in the twenty-seventh line down 
to and including the word "enemy" in the thirtieth line, by inserting after the word 
"not" in the thirty-ninth line the words: — , or who enlisted and served in said forces 
during the Philippine insurrection, — and by striking out, in the fortieth line the words 
", subject to the same proviso,", — so that clause Fifth will read as follows: — Fifth, 
A person who enlisted and was mustered into the military or naval service of the United 
States, as a part of the quota of a town in the commonwealth under any call of the 
president of the United States during the war of the rebellion or any war between the 
United States and any foreign power, or who was assigned as a part of the quota thereof 
after having enlisted and been mustered into said service, and his wife or widow and 
minor children, shall be deemed thereby to have acquired a settlement in such town; 
and any person who would otherwise be entitled to a settlement under this clause, 
but who was not a part of the quota of any town, shall, if he served as a part of the 
quota of the commonwealth, be deemed to have acquired a settlement, for himself, 
his wife or widow and minor children, in the place where he actually resided at the 
time of his enlistment. Any person who was inducted into the military or naval forces 
of the United States under the federal selective service act,* or who enlisted in said 
forces in time of war between the United States and any foreign power, w^hether he 
served as a part of the quota of the commonwealth or not, or who enlisted and served 



PartL] LA^YS AFFECTING THE DEPARTMENT. 57 

in said forces during the Philippine insurrection, and his wife or widow and minor 
children shall be deemed to have acquired a settlement in the place where he actually 
resided in this commonwealth at the time of his induction or enlistment. But these 
provisions shall not apply to any person who enlisted and received a bounty for such 
enlistment in more than one place unless the second enlistment was made after an 
honorable discharge from the first term of service, nor to any person who has been proved 
guilt}- of wilful desertion, or who left the service otherwise than by reason of disability 
or an honorable discharge. [Approved March 18, 1922. 

Chapter 231. 

Ax Act relative to the Ixstructiox of Certaix Mextally Retarded Childrex. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section forty-six of chapter seventy-one of the General Laws is hereby amended by 
adding at the end thereof the following: — No child under the control of the depart- 
ment of public welfare or of the child welfare division of the institutions department 
of the city of Boston who is three j-ears or more retarded in mental development within 
the meaning of this section, shall, after complaint made by the school committee to the 
department of public welfare or said division, be placed in a town which is not required 
to maintain a special class as provided for in this section, — so as to read as follows: 
— Section A6. The school committee of every town shall annually ascertain, under 
regulations prescribed by the department and the commissioner of mental diseases, 
the number of children three years or more retarded in mental development in attend- 
ance upon its pubUc schools, or of school age and resident therein. At the beginning 
of each school year, the committee of every town where there are ten or more such 
children shall establish special classes for their instruction according to their mental 
attainments, under regulations prescribed by the department. No child under the con- 
trol of the department of public welfare or of the child welfare division of the institu- 
tions department of the city of Boston who is three years or more retarded in mental 
development within the meaning of this section, shall, after complaint made by the 
school committee to the department of public welfare or said division, be placed in a 
town which is not required to maintain a special class as provided for in this section. 
[Approved March 31, 1922. 

Chapter 232. 

Ax Act makixg ax Appropriatiox to coxtixue the Work of clearixg the Forests 
OF the Metropolitax Parks of Fallex Trees axd Brokex Limbs axd 
Braxches. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

For continuing the work of the special commission, created by chapter thirteen of 
the acts of the present year, in clearing the forests of the metropoUtan parks of fallen 
trees and broken limbs and branches, there is hereby appropriated, in addition to any 
amount heretofore appropriated for the purpose, the further sum of fifty thousand 
dollars, to be paid from the Metropolitan Parks Maintenance Fund and assessed upon 
the cities and towns of the metropolitan parks district, in accordance with the law 
relative to assessments for the maintenance of metropolitan parks. [Approved March 
31, 1922. 

Chapter 306. 

Ax Act relative to the Powers axd Duties of the Trustees of the Massa- 
chusetts Hospital School. 
Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Chapter one hundred and twenty-one of the General Laws is hereby amended by 
striking out section twenty-nine and inserting in place thereof the following: — Section 
29. The trustees shall be a corporation for the purpose of taking and holding, by them 
and their successors, in the name of the commonwealth, and in accordance with the 
terms thereof, any grant or devise of land or any gift or bequest of money or other per- 
sonal property made for the use or benefit of the school, its inmates, former inmates or 
graduates or any association thereof, or for the use or benefit of state minor wards 
assigned to the care of the trustees under sections thirtj'-four to thirty-seven, inclusive, 
and for the purpose of preserving and investing the proceeds thereof in notes or bonds 
•secured by good and sufficient mortgages or other securities, with all the powers neces- 



58 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 

sary to effect said purposes. For said purposes the trustees may employ such agencies 
as they may from time to time determine to be wise and proper, including any trust 
company or other corporation authorized by hiw to administer trusts, and may from 
funds received as aforesaid or the income thereof pay such expenses as may be neces- 
sary for the wise administration of such gifts or trusts, or may, with the approval of 
the governor and council, delegate any powers conferred by this section upon any such 
trust company or corporation. In the use, management and administration of such 
gifts or trusts, the trustees or their agents shall in their discretion so act as most effec- 
tively to aid the beneficiaries in accordance with the terms of the gift or trust, and 
when so acting their judgments and determinations in extending or denying aid or bene- 
fit to any individual shall be conclusive and final. No trustee shall be answerable for 
the use of any money or property received b}^ any beneficiary or for the default or 
neglect of any co-trustee, or of any agent employed hereunder, or of any corporation 
to which power is delegated or transferred as herein authorized. [Avproved April 17, 
1922. 

Chapter 376. 

An Act relative to Aid to Mothers of Certain Dependent Children between 
Fourteen and Sixteen Years of Age. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section one of chapter one hundred and eighteen of the General Laws is hereby 
amended by inserting after the word "fourteen" in the second line the following: — 
or between the ages of fourteen and sixteen if and during the time when such children 
are required under section one of chapter seventy-six to attend a public day school, — 
so as to read as follows: — Section 1. This chapter shall apply to all mothers and 
their dependent children under the age of fourteen or between the ages of fourteen and 
sixteen if and during the time when such children are required under section one of 
chapter seventy-six to attend a pubUc day school, whether or not they or any of them 
may have a settlement within the commonwealth, who shall have resided therein not 
less than three years. [Approved May 2, 1922. 

Chapter 479. 

An Act relative to the Settlement of Paupers. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Chapter one hundred and sixteen of the General Laws is hereby amended by striking 
out section five and inserting in place thereof the following: — Section o. Each settle- 
ment existing on August twelfth, nineteen hundred and eleven, shall continue in force 
until changed or defeated under this chapter, but from and after said date failure for 
five consecutive years by a person, after reaching the age of twenty-one, to reside in 
a town where he had a settlement shall defeat such settlement. The time during which 
a person shall be an inmate of any almshouse, jail, prison, or other public or state insti- 
tution, within the commonwealth or in any manner under its care and direction, or that 
of an officer thereof, or of a soldiers' or sailors' home whether within or without the 
commonwealth, shall not be counted in computing the time either for acquiring or for 
losing a settlement, except as provided in section two. The settlement, existing on 
August twelfth, nineteen hundred and sixteen, of a soldier and his dependent eligible 
to receive military aid and soldiers' relief under existing laws shall be and continue in 
force while said soldier or dependent actually resides in the commonwealth and until 
a new settlement is gained in another town in the manner heretofore prescribed. [.42?- 
proved May 27, 1922. 



Part L] 



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CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 63 



Part II 



PRIVATE CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



Government supendsion of private charitable corporations is provided in three 
legislative enactments, the first of which requires the Department of Public Wel- 
fare to investigate all petitions for charitable charters, while the second and third 
call for annual inspection and annual reporting. In the following pages of this 
part of the report the functions of the Department and the year's work under 
these several statutes are explained. This statement is followed by a tabulation 
of some of the essential figures showing the financial condition and the work 
done by the various charities. 

During the year ending November 30, 1922, 86 applications for charters have 
been referred to this Department by the Secretary of the Commonwealth for 
investigation, under General Laws, Chapter 180, Section 6. In 8 cases the petitions 
were withdrawn from this Department before the hearing and in 3 cases they were 
withdrawn after the hearing. Five cases are still pending. This Department has 
investigated, given hearings and reported on 74 applications, including 4 received 
^nor t' ^the beginning of the year. Seventy-four applications, as listed below, have 
^d upon by the Secretary of the Commonwealth. 

\rmy'and Navy Service Committee, Inc., Boston. 

-> T^rkshire Benevolent Association for the Blind, Inc., Pittsfield. 
L.. a- Health League, Incorporated, Boston. 
Bost.;n Seaman's Friend Society (Incorporated), Boston. 
Boston Zezmer Association Inc., Boston. 
Brockton Social Service Council, Inc., Brockton. 
Brookline Service Club, Inc., Brookline. 
Citizens' Firemen's Relief Fund of Haverhill, Inc., Haverhill. 
Community Child Welfare Association, Incorporated, Boston. 
The Community Service Corporation of Millbury, Millbury. 
Community Service of Hamilton and Wenham, Incorporated, Hamilton. 
Community Welfare Association of Springfield, Massachusetts, Springfield. 
The County Committee of Young Men's Christian Associations of Plymouth County, 

Massachusetts, Incorporated, Brockton. 
East Boston Free Loan Association, Inc., Boston. 

Ellis Brett Neighborhood Center of Community Service of Brockton, Inc., Brockton. 
Fall Brook Mothers' Club, Inc., Middleborough. 
Falmouth Nursing Association, Incorporated, Falmouth. 
Folk Handicrafts Guild, Boston. 
The Forty Associates Inc., Cambridge. 
The Fraternity Club, Inc., Beverly. 
George Marston Whitin Gymnasium Inc., Northbridge. 
The Girls' Friendly Society in the Diocese of Massachusetts, Inc., Boston. 
Girls' League for Service, Inc., Worcester. 
Groton Charitable Recreation Committee Inc., Groton. 
Haverhill Teachers' Association, Incorporated, Haverhill. 
Hebrew Free Loan Association of Chelsea, Chelsea. 
Hebrew Ladies Aid Society of Everett, Everett. 
The Hebrew Ladies Aid Society of Newburyport, Newburyport. 



04 DEPART.MEXT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 

Hecht Xeigliborhood House Incorporated, Boston. 

Independent Arbiter Verein of Maiden, Inc., Maiden. 

lolanda Club Inc., Boston. 

Italian American War Veterans Association, Inc., Worcester. 

Jewish Children's Bureau of Boston, Inc., Boston. 

The Junior League of Boston, Inc., Boston. 

Kfar Debian Society, Inc., Boston. 

Lancaster Social Service Association, Lancaster. 

Longnieadow Community House .Association, Inc., Longmeadow. 

Long Pond Ladies Aid Society, Plymouth. 

The Lucy Wheelock Kindergarten .llumnae Association, Incorporated, Boston. 

The Lydia Collett Corporation, North Scituate. 

The Lydia E. Pinkham Memorial, Incorporated, Salem. 

Maiden Arbeiter Ferein, Inc., Maiden. 

The Masonic Club of Stoneham, Stoneham. 

Massachusetts Association for Occupational Therapy, Inc., Boston. 

Massachusetts Home of the Order Sons of Italy in America, Inc., Boston. 

M. I. T. Masonic Club, Inc., Cambridge. 

The Men's Federated Glee Clubs of Greater Boston, Incorporated, Boston. 

Mothers' League of Brockton, Inc., Brockton. 

New Bedford Gospel Hall Assembly, Inc., New Bedford. 

The Newton Circle, Incorporated, Newton. 

The One Hundred, Inc., Boston. 

The Orange Visiting Nurse Association, Inc., Orange. 

Pan-Cretan Society Minos Inc., Boston. 

Pepperell Men's Club, Pepperell. 

Phil Sheridan Camp Association, Boston. 

Pilinover Relief Association Inc., Boston. 

The Pines Community Association, Billerica. 

The Polish-American Citizens Club of Northbridge, Massachusetts, Northbridge. 

Revere Visiting Nurse Association, Inc., Revere. 

Rudnick Charitable Foundation, Inc., Boston. 

Rutland Entertainment Association, Inc., Rutland. 

Serv^ice League Foundation, Inc., Springfield. 

Skogsblomman Society, Inc., Auburn. 

Stearns Fund, Inc., Boston. 

The Stockbridge Vacation House Inc., Stockbridge. 

Thomas P. McDonough Knights of Columbus Building Association, Inc., North 

Attleborough. 
Victory House -Associates, Inc., Reading. 

Watuppa Grange, No. 365, Patrons of Husbandry, Incorporated, Westport. 
Weymouth Hospital, Weymouth. 

Weymouth Visiting Nurse Association, Inc., Weymouth. 
The White Ribbon Home, Inc. of Massachusetts, Maiden. 
Winthrop Community Hospital, Winthrop. 
Winthrop Young Men's Hebrev\' Association Inc., Winthrop. 
Worcester Masonic Club, Inc.. Worcester. 



Seventy-three of the above petitions have been granted and charters issued, 
while 1 has been refused. 

During the twelve years and nine months which have elapsed since the passage 
of the law (March 7, 1910, to November 30, 1922), 795 petitions have been referred 
to this Department. The Department has reported upon 701 applications for 
charters, 619 of w^hich were granted and 75 refused; 3 had been withdrawn and 4 
had not been acted upon by the Secretarj' of the Commonwealth up to November 
30, 1922. In 78 other cases the applications were withdrawn before the report 
was made. Si.xteen cases are still pending in the Department. 

General Laws, Chapter 121, Section 7 requires the Department of Public Welfare 
to make annual inspection of charitable corporations which consent to said 
in.spection. 

Two hundred fiftj^-one inspections have been made during the past year, in- 
volving numerous conferences with directors and many visits to institutions. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 65 

There have been 407 inquiries in regard to particular charities and general 
matters connected with the field of private charity. 

Of the 922 charitable corporations which made returns to this Department 
during 1922, 105 are homes for the aged; 122 are child-helping agencies; 186 are 
hospitals or other institutions for aiding the sick; 132 are agencies giving family 
aid; and 117 are organizations doing neighborhood and club work. The remain- 
ing 260 corporations form a miscellaneous group chiefly civic or eleemosjmary in 
their nature. 

An analysis of the returns made in 1922 shows the total property, real and per- 
sonal, of all these charities to be $162,388,225.23. Incumbrances on real estate 
came to but S3, 856,377. 09. Subscriptions, donations and entertainments brought 
in $10,176,783.68. Earnings and refunds, including receipts from beneficiaries; 
amounted to $14,973,235.95. Legacies were received to the amount of 83,454,899.43, 
of this sum, $1,599,285.54 was unrestricted. The current expenditures were 
$32,101,010.88, of which $5,914,901.20 was paid for salaries and wages. As hos- 
pital salaries and wages are not reported separately, they are not included in the 
last amount. These agencies reported 14,665 paid employees. During the year 
this group of charities rendered some sort of charitable assistance to about 2,053,503 
separate individuals. 

General Laws, Chapter 180, Section 12, provides that every charitable corporation 
must make to this Department an annual report on or before the first day of Novem- 
ber in each year, and further pro\ides that if an}' corporation fails for two successive 
3'ears to make the report, the Supreme Court may decree its dissolution. 

The Department of Public Welfare endorses no private charitable organization or 
agency. This rule is absolute, regardless of the known standing of an}' such society. 
Inspection and the publication of the annual return in this volume do not mean 
approval; on the contrary, inspection may mean the discovery of conditions calling 
for condemnation. No agency is warranted, therefore, in using the fact of in- 
spection in such manner as to lead the pubhc to beheve that the Department has 
approved or in any sense commends its work. 

Figures from the reports of corporations for the last financial year available are 
given on the following pages. The abstracts are arranged by towns in alphabetical 
order under each town. 



()6 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 
Property 
reported 


Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 


Subscrip- 
tions. Dona- 
tions, etc. 


Earnings 

and 
Refunds 


I 


Abingtox. 
Abington Y. M. C. A 


$25,000 00 


- 


$4,503 08 


$826 96 


2 
3 


Adams. 
Polish Roman Catholic Society of St. Stanislaw 

Kostka of Adams 

Sisters of Providence (Grey lock Rest) 


17,741 72 
75,600 00 


$7,000 00 
22,900 00 


1.374 55 


7.192 33 
1.305 00 


4 

5 
6 


Amesbury. 
The Amesbury Hospital Association . 
Ladies' Charitable Society of Amesbury 
Young Men's Christian Association of Amesbury' 


1,369 06 
10,023 25 


- 


98 45 


- 


7 


Amherst. 
Amherst Home for Aged Women 


42,229 91 


- 


554 47 


483 62 


8 
9 


Andover. 

Andover Guild 

Andover Home for Aged People .... 


6.000 00 
101,777 20 


_ 


1.519 01 
153 50 


42 50 


10 
11 
12 


Arlington. 
The Arlington Training School for Nurses, Inc. . 
Order of St. Anne (St. John's House for Children) 
Symmes Arlington Hospital .... 


43,617 44 
122,768 09 


740 00 
12,500 00 


8.253 54 
47.020 49 


10.080 00 

1.193 67 

40.845 80 


13 
14 


Athol. 

Athol Memorial Hospital 

Athol Y. M. C. A 


- 


- 


174 30 
12,230 40 


6.840 00 
5.811 67 


15 
16 
17 
18 
19 


Attleboro. 
Associated Charities of Attleboro, Inc. 

Attleborough Hospital 

The Attleboro League for Girls and Women, Inc. 

Attleboro Y. M. C. A 

Attleboro Springs, Inc. 1 


165.253 50 
15,000 00 
99,199 18 


12,000 00 


4,231 39 
1.567 90 
2,058 32 
6.702 50 


404 95 

25.809 68 

1,763 48 


20 


Auburn. 
Auburn District Nursing Association, Inc.*. 


- 


- 


- 


- 


21 


Avon. 
Lutheran Orphan's Home Board 


36.250 00 


- 


7,448 83 


1,277 00 


22 
23 


Ayer. 

Ayer Hospital Association 

White Ribbon Home, Inc 


1,150 79 
20,176 33 


5,000 00 


2.765 61 


10,887 46 


24 
25 


Barnstable. 

Cape Cod Hospital 

Hyannis Normal Students' Permanent Loan 
Fund Company 


45.000 00 


24,000 00 


11.313 89 
588 45 


16.528 54 


26 


Barre. 
Stetson Home 


368.275 00 


_ 


- 


1.320 99 


27 


Belmont. 
Belmont Community Nursing Association 


4.775 00 


- 


1.241 35 


1,268 75 


28 


Berlin. 

Elizabeth Rector Harper Bungalow for Destitute 

Children, Incorporated 


12,500 00 


_ 


875 00 


_ 


29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 


Beverly. 
Beverly Female Charitable Society . 

Beverly Fuel Society 

Beverly Hospital Corporation .... 

Country Week Association 

Fisher Charitable Society ..... 
New England Industrial School for Deaf Mutes 

Old Ladies' Home Society 

Y. M. C. A. of Beverly 


14,028 00 
23,790 40 

667,972 06 
75,000 00 
60,606 34 
89,600 00 

149,080 00 


- 


94 00 

12,103 09 
4,500 00 

4,196 00 

667 19 

12,720 76 


35 40 
53,400 03 

287 10 

22,418 19 

1,778 40 

7,526 51 


37 


Bl.vndford. 
Ladies Benevolent Society of Blandford . 


- 


- 


478 96 


- 



No report. 



Report not due. 



PartlL] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 

Charitable Corporations. 



67 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 


Legacies 
specifically 
restricted 
to Capital 


Unrestricted 
Legacies 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 

Number 

aided 


Total 

Number 

Free 


Number 

of 

Families 

aided 




$940 25 


- 


_ 


$6,135 20 


$2,923 31 


2 


1,130 


850 


- 


1 


522 40 


- 


- 


7,655 72 
28.314 44 


1,121 50 
2,723 99 


2 
10 


7 
774 


12 


- 


2 
3 


432 65 


- 


- 


684 25 


- 


- 


79 


- 


- 


4 
5 

6 


2,372 37 


$3,700 00 


$500 00 


3,489 55 


823 23 


1 


7 


- 


- 


7 


298 50 
4,109 68 


- 


- 


2,170 67 
4,102 27 


1,250 00 
1,795 67 


2 
2 


6 


6 


- 


8 
9 


4 63 
504 96 


- 


- 


10,046 54 
13,868 52 
39,247 10 


1,616 00 


1 

40 


23 
673 


10 
34 


- 


10 
11 
12 


3,932 72 


- 


- 


7,969 66 
21,958 64 


9,334 13 


9 
6 


249 


- 


- 


13 
14 


26 36 

8,228 01 

891 83 

2,394 82 


- 


1,000 00 
2,000 00 


5,757 28 
37,289 84 

4,110 69 
17,084 43 


2,028 98 

2,107 46 
8,342 40 


2 

25 

2 

4 


400 
763 
500 


93 


80 


15 
16 
17 
18 
19 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


20 


82 65 


- 


724 00 


9,134 07 


2,336 67 


3 


43 


31 


- 


21 


50 06 
476 92 


- 


- 


10,984 81 


3,248 03 


4 


21 


16 


- 


22 
23 


729 93 


- 


- 


34,696 22 


- 


15 


324 


3 


- 


24 


78 81 


- 


- 


1,548 00 


- 


- 


14 


- 


- 


25 


15,845 78 


- 


- 


16,283 61 


6,241 36 


10 


36 


36 


- 


26 


84 25 


- 


4,500 00 


3.530 45 


1,632 66 


2 


186 


35 


142 


27 


- 


- 


- 


875 00 


- 


- 


45 


45 


- 


28 


258 07 
1,212 71 
15,728 64 
4 54 
3,470 99 
3,457 73 
6,803 48 
3,651 02 


- 


- 


345 34 

971 37 

113,400 53 

4,436 39 

3,366 88 

22,584 80 

6,353 50 

27,669 45 


_3 

1,377 75 

300 00 

12,080 04 

2,358 50 
13,164 75 


80 
6 

17 
4 
6 


22 

68 
1,783 

42 
44 
12 
680 


67 
552 

12 


75 


29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 


- 


- 


- 


519 56 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


37 



- Organizations aided. 



3 Not separately reported. 



68 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 


Incum- 


Subscrip)- 


Earnings 






Property 


brances on 


tions, Dona- 


and 






reported 


Real Estate 


tions, etc. 


Refunds 




Boston. 










1 


Abraham Lincoln Post, N'eterans of the World War 


$15,000 00 


$9,000 00 


$621 82 


- 


2 


A. C. Ratshesky Charity Foundation 


418.151 88 




_ 


_ 


3 


Adanis Nervine Asylum 


962.642 35 


- 


- 


- 


4 


Agoos Family Charity Fund .... 


110.375 25 


- 


- 


- 


5 


All Souls' Lend a Hand Club. Inc. . 


4,633 70 


- 


2,750 61 


$1,533 92 


6 


American Humane PMucation Society 


148.673 24 


- 


4,441 80 


4,533 17 


7 


American Invalid Aid Society of Boston' . 


- 


- 


- 




8 


American Unitarian Association > 


- 


_ 


- 


_ 


9 


Animal Rescue League of Boston 


293,663 09 


_ 


14,897 99 


15,335 32 


10 


Army Nurse Association of Massachusetts' 


- 


_ 






11 


Association for Independent Co-operative Living, 












The 


45,000 00 


45.000 00 


- 


13,698 00 


12 


Association for the Work of Mercy in the Diocese 












of Massachusetts 


36,334 53 


_ 


9,204 55 


6,659 23 


13 


Association of the Evangelical Lutheran Church 












for Works of Mercy 


16,050 00 


- 


5,616 78 


7,846 48 


14 


Association of the Hawthorne Club . 


4,100 25 


_ 


2,634 88 


2,185 67 


15 


Auxiliary Relief Branch of the Russian and Polish 












Jewish Central Committee at Jerusalem . 


- 


- 


8.405 03 


- 


16 


Baby Hygiene Association 


30,693 35 


- 


104,460 80 


5,268 48 


17 


Barnard Memorial 


182,233 97 


_ 


_ 


_ 


18 


Beacon Hill Community Centre, Inc., The 


8,400 00 


6.500 00 


6,490 00 


593 01 


19 


Beneficent Society of the New England Con- 












servatory of Music 


13,237 50 


_ 


354 00 


481 50 


20 


Benoth Israel Sheltering Home' . 


- 


_ 




- 


21 


Berkeley Infirmary, Inc., The .... 


5,000 00 


2,497 39 


1,007 00 


2,104 00 


22 


Berkshire Music Colony, Inc 


— 


_ 


- 


_ 


23 


Bethany Rescue Mission 


- 


_ 


1,289 24 


- 


24 


Bethany Union for Young Women 


60,760 00 


- 


1,112 98 


13.943 56 


25 


Beth David and Linath Hazedek Association' . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


26 


Bethesda Society 


137.731 21 


- 


7,061 00 


2,859 47 


27 


Beth Israel Hospital Association ' . . . 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


28 


Beyrouth Brotherhood Society .... 


- 


_ 


336 16 


- 


29 


Board of Ministerial Aid' 


- 


^ _ 




_ 


30 


Boston Baptist Bethel City Mission Society ' . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


31 


Boston Baptist Social Union .... 


449,328 45 


_ 


- 


- 


32 


Boston Branch Baron de Hirsch Fund 


5,112 50 


_ 


- 


- 


33 


Boston Branch of the Christian and Missionary 












AUiance, Inc 


8,200 00 


4,300 00 


17,376 01 


1,415 23 


34 


Boston Children's Aid Society . . . 


529,989 64 




47,370 96 


30,186 52 


35 


Boston Children's Friend Society 


277,908 00 


- 


8,241 99 


3,538 23 


36 


Boston City Hospital 


4.569,864 52 


- 


1,007,305 33 


192,236 47 


37 


Boston Dispensary 


519,176 97 


- 


108,453 84 


82,340 40 


38 


Boston Educational Association for Deaf Children 


2,910 00 


_ 


32 00 




39 


Boston Episcopal Charitable Society . 


152,000 00 


_ 




- 


40 


Boston Fatherless and Widows' Society 


190.129 91 


- 


198 00 


- 


41 


Boston Floating Hospital* 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


42 


Boston Hebrew Ladies Aid Association' 


_ 


_ 


- 


_ 


43 


Boston Home for Incurables .... 


901,158 15 


- 


1,475 00 


1,789 48 


44 


Boston Hungarian Rifke Benais Jerusalem, Inc. 


- 


- 


411 00 


- 


45 


Boston Industrial Home ..... 


88,157 97 


20.000 00 


7,251 85 


7,111 88 


46 


Boston Ladies' Bethel Society .... 


- 




191 00 


- 


47 


Boston Leather Trade Benevolent Society . 


68,031 50 


- 


1,830 00 


- 


48 


Boston Legal Aid Society 


60,276 29 


50,000 00 


28.548 00 


3,997 61 


49 


Boston Lying-in Hospital 


1,990,954 68 


_ 


20,487 92 


35,065 68 


50 


Boston Marine Society 


305,400 00 


_ 


2,000 00 


- 


51 


Boston Masonic Club 


135,000 00 


139,975 00 


4,939 93 


73,495 49 


52 


Boston Music School Settlement 


8.450 00 


5.687 50 


9,443 98 


6,004 17 


53 


Boston North End Mi.ssion 


61,982 20 




3,216 85 


5,580 07 


54 


Boston Nursery for Blind Babies 


295,900 00 


- 


5.033 75 


1,126 55 


55 


Boston Pilots' Relief Society .... 


248.870 45 


_ 


495 00 




56 


Boston Port and Seamen's Aid Society, Managers 












of 


469.399 97 


- 


2,633 50 


14.220 54 


57 


Boston Provident Association .... 


463,003 60 


_ 


28,310 01 


3,256 28 


58 


Boston Public School Teachers' Retirement Fund 


705,129 84 


- 




58,516 25 


59 


Boston Relief Committee Incorporated 




_ 


22,180 60 




60 


Boston St. Raphael Italian Immigrant Society ' . 


- 


- 




- 


61 


Boston School of Occupational Therapy, Inc. 


18,500 00 


13.500 00 


5,604 75 


12,577 23 



' No report. 



Report not due. 



Part II.] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



69 



Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 


Legacies 
specifically 
restricted 
to Capital 


Unrestricted 
Legacies 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 

Number 

aided 


Total 

Number 

Free 


Number 

of 

Families 

aided 




$991 32 






$1,492 60 


S952 50 


^ 








1 


6,819 00 


- 


$5,000 00 


6,427 11 


- 


- 


292 


- 


- 


2 


38.474 70 


- 


450 00 


71,496 17 


30,055 26 


49 


195 


51 


- 


3 


7.695 80 


- 


- 


11,039 83 


- 


- 


192 


- 


- 


4 


239 01 


- 


- 


3,248 00 


- 


- 


36 


36 


9 


5 


7,052 54 


- 


: 


24.704 44 


10,638 09 


5 


- 






6 

7 


15,668 59 


SI, 000 00 


65,815 12 


57,746 44 


37,467 31 


25 


51,772 


- 


- 


8 
9 
10 


15 00 


- 


- 


13,198 00 


3,627 28 


5 


f 22 
\ 149 


} ™ 


5 


11 


759 39 


- 


- 


16,196 31 


5,611 00 


1 


240 


200 


50 


12 


429 55 


_ 


_ 


14,355 59 


1,604 17 


8 


28 


26 


_ 


13 


174 22 


- 


- 


3,525 70 


693 04 


6 


300 


200 


- 


14 


- 


- 


- 


8,461 42 


3,271 09 


2 


- 


- 


- 


15 


1.915 80 


- 


- 


65,922 77 


53,242 79 


37 


f 22 

1 15,894 

22 


} 15,894 


- 


16 


5,253 92 


- 


5,500 00 


5,396 31 


780 00 


1 


_ 


17 


1 80 


- 


- 


7,073 70 


6,086 53 


9 


3,344 


2,725 


- 


18 


453 98 


- 


- 


2,082 25 


- 


- 


14 


- 


- 


19 
on 


597 31 


- 


- 


3.705 23 


-3 


5 


- 


- 


- 


21 


1,501 00 


_ 


_ 


2,728 00 


512 00 


1 


3,909 


3,909 


5 


22 
23 


1.468 65 


5,315 44 


- 


16,583 90 


4,449 47 


7 


63 


1 




24 
25 


6,621 33 


- 


3,381 23 


16,456 81 


7,042 02 


7 


{ rr 


1 ! 


- 


26 


- 


- 


- 


107 80 


- 


- 


20 


- 


7 


27 
28 
29 


11,758 72 


- 


- 


11,297 34 


8,220 80 


18 


794 


794 


175 


30 
31 


243 58 


- 


- 


249 08 












32 


900 00 




_ 


16,363 32 


3,004 00 


2 


13 


_ 


4 


33 


3,600 00 




32,169 42 


128,073 26 


43,140 06 


36 


415 


46 




34 


3,277 01 


- 




18,099 91 


5,926 29 


10 


216 


129 


152 


35 


22,367 28 


- 


- 


1,454,647 19 


-3 


272 


87,583 


78.992 




36 


18,139 10 


8,663 00 


- 


218,888 93 


-3 


156 


1,064 


516 


- 


37 


341 51 




_ 


394 67 


303 00 


8 


60 




_ 


38 


7,366 65 


830 00 


- 


6,467 52 






68 


68 


_ 


39 


13,629 59 


425 00 


- 


13,868 45 


- 


- 


145 




- 


40 
41 


36,195 01 


597 35 


13,191 53 


34,462 38 


17,385 90 


25 


40 


28 


: 


42 
43 


- 


- 


- 


382 50 


- 


- 


/ 12 

I 1.921 


I 


- 


44 


1,448 58 


- 


- 


15,948 01 


4,002 05 


11 


2,825 


490 


- 


45 


- 


- 


- 


46 85 


- 


- 


12 




_ 


46 


63 62 


- 


- 


2,444 00 


75 00 


1 


4 


4 


- 


47 


3,603 17 


- 


- 


28,367 73 


17,276 02 


13 


/ 62 

I 5,233 


] 4.062 


- 


48 


16,6S9 21 


- 


5,000 00 


80,737 84 


-3 


59 


1,109 


185 


_ 


49 


18,550 66 


2,000 00 




19,743 33 


2,200 00 




86 




- 


50 


967 28 


- 


- 


35,407 64 


5,325 31 


25 




_ 


1 


51 


8 78 


- 


- 


11,294 29 


9,107 08 


39 


508 


10 




52 


2,478 53 


- 


1,225 00 


21,413 12 


8,318 48 


15 


82 


37 


59 


53 


8,040 28 


33,940 60 


- 


14,019 79 


5,873 00 


10 


46 


18 




54 


16,095 33 


- 


- 


11,706 83 


300 00 




20 


20 


- 


55 


2,633 50 


_ 


_ 


28,956 63 


10,810 88 


14 


8,719 


3.711 


8 


56 


28.631 19 


- 


- 


59,082 16 


16,483 65 


9 


1,122 




1,113 


57 


43,541 71 


- 


- 


105,838 17 


763 50 


1 


305 


_ 




58 


15 18 


- 


- 


22,208 30 




- 




- 


- 


59 


— 


— 


— 


- 


- 


- 


— 


_ 


_ 


60 


l.On 69 


~ 


- 


17,875 06 


7,890 77 


15 


233 


146 


- 


61 



Organizations aided. 



Not separately reported. 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 


Incum- 


Subscrip- 


Earnings 






Property 


brances on 


tions, Dona- 


and 






reported 


Real Estate 


tions, etc. 


Refunds 




Boston — Con. 










1 


Boston Seaman's Friend Society 


1210,448 46 


- 


$20,832 67 


- 


2 


Boston Section Council of Jewish Women 


- 


- 


2,143 75 


$3,053 00 


3 


Boston Society for the Care of Girls . 


500,454 43 


- 


19,308 88 


8,156 16 


4 


Boston Society of Decorative Art 


5,500 00 


- 


- 


242 05 


5 


Boston Tuberculosis Association* 




_ 


_ 




6 


Boston United Moath Chitim Association . 


- 


- 


4,396 02 


_ 


7 


Boston University Nanking Association 


- 


- 


1,020 43 


- 


8 


Boston Wesleyan Association ..... 


499,744 00 


- 


- 


- 


9 


Boston Young Men's Christian Association 


1,696,825 98 


1200,000 00 


73,298 82 


644,144 04 


10 


Boston Young Men's Christian Union 


1,550,921 80 


- 


28,107 90 


33,169 87 


11 


Boston Young Women's Christian Association . 


306,108 96 


34,000 00 


43,034 12 


226,449 39 


12 I Boys' Club of Boston Incorporated . 


351,100 00 




38,025 55 


4,011 28 


13 


Brigham Hospital' 


- 


- 


- 


- 


14 


British Charitable Society 


21,744 98 


- 


1,543 71 


1,386 45 


15 


Brooke House 


68,000 00 


- 


523 00 


20,426 37 


16 


Burnap Free Home for Aged Women . 


134,000 00 


- 


3,532 20 


_ 


17 


Barrage Hospital Association .... 
Cape Cod Association 


200,000 00 


- 


3,202 62 


- 


18 


24,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


19 


Carney Hospital 


265,200 00 


53,500 00 


8,029 76 


133,849 50 


20 


Carney Hospital Nurses' Alumnae, Inc. 


- 


- 


- 


445 24 


21 


Carolina Industrial School 


7,960 14 


_ 


5,679 15 


970 25 


22 


Channing Home 


161,871 97 


- 


997 00 


2,291 80 


23 


Charitable Burial .Association i . . . . 


- 


- 


- 




24 


Charitable Irish Society 


- 


- 


6,710 00 


- 


25 


Charitable Surgical Appliance Shop . 


23,400 00 


- 


- 


41,780 92 


26 


Charity of Edward Hopkins, Trustees of . 


73,243 04 


- 


- 


- 


27 


Charlestown Poor's Fund. Trustees of 


44,933 77 


_ 


- 


- 


28 Children's Heart Hospital 


25,000 00 


- 


6,000 00 


969 00 


29 Children's Hospital, The 


2,187,977 53 


125,000 00 


93,119 15 


130,397 22 


30 Children's Mission to Children, The . 


646,658 97 


- 


17,897 83 


15,350 36 


31 1 Chinese Mission of New England 




- 


5,660 05 


- 


32 1 Christian Science Benevolent Association, The . 


980,386 32 


- 


214,095 12 


182,087 77 


33 : Church Home Association, The .... 


708 00 


- 


-* 


- 


34 1 Church Home Society for the Care of Children of 










the Protestant Episcopal Church 


265,201 33 


- 


19,794 94 


16,719 51 


35 1 City Missionary Society . . . . . 


192,213 25 


_ 


29,496 17 


2,813 93 


36 Columbus Day Nursery of South Boston . 


5,700 00 


- 


2,607 58 


- 


37 Community Service of Boston, Inc. . 




- 


44,846 50 


- 


38 Conference of Baptist Ministers in Massachusetts 


270,832 45 


- 


1,515 00 


- 


39 


Consumers' League of Massachusetts . 




- 


3,853 20 


- 


40 


Consumptives' Home, Trustees of the 


272,440 13 


- 


- 


- 


41 


Cooperative Workrooms, Inc 


1,749 20 


- 


12,958 43 


17,928 38 


42 


Corner Stone Welfare Council, Inc. . 


- 


- 


20 00 


- 


43 


Dahlgren Memorial Hall Association . 


2,187 11 


- 




- 


44 


Daly Industrial School 


121,600 00 


- 


2,098 31 


14,086 56 


45 


Deaconess' Aid Society of New England 


- 


- 


2,104 53 


8,599 07 


46 


Deaconess Home of the First African Methodist 












Episcopal Society of Boston i . . . . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


47 


Denison House 


7,850 00 


- 


12,698 35 


2,377 75 


48 


Devens Benevolent Society i . . . . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


49 


Dewing Memorial i 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


50 


Diocesan Board of Missions' .... 


- 


- 


- 


- 


51 


Dispensary for Women 


- 


- 


175 00 


1,508 35 


52 


Donations to the Protestant Episcopal Church, 












Trustees of 1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


53 


Dorchester House 


1,950 00 


- 


2,149 82 


- 


54 


Dorchester Relief Society 


13,483 27 


- 


3,296 58 


- 


55 


Durant Incorporated, The 


- 


- 


138,515 00 


6,488 35 


56 


Eastern Missionary Association .... 


40,000 00 


5,500 00 


8,894 99 


- 


57 


Elizabeth Peabody House Association 


157,353 24 


73,825 00 


19,240 09 


13,170 99 


58 


Ellen M. Gifford Sheltering Home Corporation . 


188,358 73 


- 


- 


- 


59 


Ellis Memorial and Eldredge House, Inc. . 


28,740 66 


4,200 00 


19,163 19 


1,481 42 


60 


Eolian F>rotective Society, Inc.* . 


— 


— 


— 


— 


61 


Episcopal City Mission, The .... 


487,898 26 


22,150 00 


32,605 04 


419 53 



No report. 



Report not due. 



Part II.] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



71 



Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 


Legacies 
specifically 
restricted 
to Capital 


Unrestricted 
Legacies 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 

Number 

aided 


Total 

Number 

Free 


Number 

of 

Families 

aided 




$14,290 42 




$14,312 74 


$31,991 13 


$15,949 83 


15 








1 


66 46 


- 


- 


4,950 59 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


30,082 64 


$100 00 


100 00 


53,078 99 


25,592 12 


17 


208 


9 


- 


3 
4 


: 


: 


- 


4,396 02 


158 40 


8 


2,130 


2.130 


489 


5 
6 


19 25 


- 


_ 


2,229 44 


2,161 32 


1 




- 


- 


7 


35,750 07 


- 


- 


46,633 22 


9,964 94 


10 


- 


- 


~ 


8 


14,744 44 


288 93 


- 


734,191 92 


122,672 76 


321 


f 62 

I 13,395 


} 786 


- 


9 


39,694 12 


2,100 00 


6,413 69 


100,894 11 


43,849 19 


■56 


/ 942 
1 8,299 


} 2,760 


- 


10 


18,933 49 


10,368 02 


_ 


291,065 90 


98,615 70 


108 




_ 


11 


61 67 


1,100 00 


- 


42,158 85 


24,005 77 


33 


5,367 


- 


- 


12 
13 


844 78 


- 


- 


3,671 33 


500 00 


- 


f 12 

I 239 


1 239 

76 
18 


39 


14 


2,172 16 


30,196 67 


- 


20,102 34 


8,850 70 


14 


1 441 


2 


15 


4,988 50 


- 


11,070 45 


8,515 92 


3,597 89 


5 


18 


_ 


16 


- 


- 




3,209 76 


1,205 00 


1 




- 


- 


17 


1,183 12 


- 


- 


1,100 00 


- 


- 


6 


- 


- 


18 


795 94 


- 


8,719 90 


144,441 76 


- 


156 


2,868 


295 


- 


19 


12 00 


- 


- 


828 91 


- 


- 


f 22 

10 
52 


} - 
41 


- 


20 


498 38 


_ 


_ 


5,351 76 


3,351 75 


6 


_ 


21 


7,874 40 


- 


3,500 00 


14,606 62 


5,915 00 


9 


84 


28 


2 


22 


591 63 


- 


_ 


6,809 5.1 


875 00 


_ 


11 


11 


_ 


24 


1,102 20 


- 


- 


39,026 76 


20,874 20 


13 






- 


25 


4,046 25 


- 


_ 


3,647 33 


200 00 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


26 


1,925 85 


- 


_ 


2,562 93 


250 00 


_ 


_ 


- 


165 


27 


556 99 


- 


_ 


8,888 38 


-3 


5 


30 


- 




28 


47,559 22 


31,809 24 


- 


323,418 66 


-3 


174 


17,057 


285 


- 


29 


31,866 19 


- 


7,761 53 


86,872 04 


25,348 03 


15 


52 


- 


- 


30 


39 00 




- 


5,780 29 


2,489 34 


4 


400 


400 


100 


31 


12,739 00 


17,776 72 


542 50 


293,997 96 


-3 


112 


472 


18 




32 


16 50 


_ 




- 


- 








- 


33 


16,442 30 


_ 


7,250 00 


77,652 27 


29,127 28 


14 


/ 22 

\ 183 
450 


175 


_ 


34 


9,567 45 


_ 


_ 


43,460 65 


23,481 01 


35 


_ 


35 


9 81 


- 


- 


3,104 48 


945 00 


5 


11,321 


11,321 


- 


36 


147 52 


- 


- 


46,713 51 


9,007 00 


5 


- 


- 


- 


37 


14,120 14 


- 


- 


1,091 38 


350 00 




49 


46 


_ 


38 


80 08 


- 


- 


4,631 29 


3,182 25 


1 






- 


39 


26,378 59 


4,346 22 


4,129 92 


31,932 33 


4,083 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


40 


205 58 


- 


- 


29,438 94 


6,931 00 


7 


I 391 


} 391 


- 


41 


- 


- 


- 


65 85 




_ 


_ 


- 


42 


54 35 


- 


- 


2,062 85 


18 00 


1 


39 


39 


- 


43 


1,491 00 


- 


- 


18,459 95 


3,202 00 


10 


121 


16 


- 


44 


123 66 


- 


- 


9,391 59 


- 


- 


12 

I 15 


) - 


- 


45 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 




_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


46 


489 15 


- 


- 


18,760 42 


4,164 04 


13 


1,585 


- 


- 


47 


— 


— 


— 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


— 


48 


- 


- 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


_ 


49 


— 


_ 


_ 


_ 




_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


50 


- 


- 


- 


1,778 78 


665 00 


1 


2 


2 


- 


51 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


52 


80 59 


100 00 


- 


2,812 68 


1 ,856 44 


5 


500 


500 


_ 


53 


1,288 26 


- 


- 


4,995 57 


600 00 


1 


40 


21 


_ 


54 


1,810 84 


- 


- 


147,089 53 


5,562 C3 


2 






- 


55 


263 28 


- 


- 


14,099 33 


2,897 09 


1 


240 


140 


- 


56 


2,755 19 


3,000 00 


- 


36,856 97 


16,773 91 


6 


1,920 


760 


_ 


57 


7,597 26 


- 


- 


4,631 52 


1,644 75 


2 


734 


734 


- 


58 


101 74 


- 


- 


21,710 24 


11,167 29 


11 


1,500 


- 




59 
60 
61 


14,210 17 


2,519 30 


2,058 00 


54,284 36 


27,429 14 


76 


- 


- 


- 



2 Organizations aided. 



Not separately reported. 



DEPARTME.XT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 


Incum- 


Subscrip- 


Earnings 






Property 


brances on 


tions, Dona- 


and 






repoi ted 


Real Estate 


tions, etc. 


Refunds 




Boston — Con. 










1 


Euxinus Pontus Association! .... 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


2 i 


Evangelical Alliance of Greater Boston' 


- 


- 


- 


- 


^ 


Evangelistic Association of New P^ngland . 


$9,022 07 


_ 


$16,048 60 


- 


4 


Faith and Hope Association, The 


2,500 00 


$500 00 


3,947 69 


$1,262 50 


5 


Family Welfare Society of Boston 


352,522 88 




69,179 15 


- 


6 


Farm and Trades School, The .... 


602,871 85 


- 


11.240 65 


9,049 14 


7 


Fathers' and Mothers' Club .... 


4,916 50 


800 00 


2,133 16 


90 51 


8 


Faulkner Hospital (\)rporation .... 


622,790 94 


- 


- 


86,238 41 


9 


Federated Jewish Charities of Boston 


89,635 34 


30,180 00 


324,582 56 


- 


10 


Finnish Working People's Educational League'. 


_ 




- 


- 


11 


First Spiritualist Ladies' Aid Society . 


- 


- 


223 28 


902 43 


12 


Florence Crittenton League of Compassion, In- 












corporated 


181,366 72 


- 


13,275 54 


11,178 67 


13 


Forsyth Dental Infirmary for Children 


3,100,919 00 


- 


- 


15,806 12 


14 


Fragment Society, The 


28,189 61 


- 


232 00 


- 


15 


Francis E. Willard Settlement .... 


184,460 94 


15,000 00 


24,288 55 


37,277 89 


16 


Frances Merry Barnard Home, Inc. . 


42,631 76 


_ 


- 


- 


17 


Franklin Scjuare House, The .... 


572,098 93 


101,000 00 


2,113 91 


317,958 57 


18 


Franklin Typographical Society .... 


80,965 14 


- 


1,252 50 


4,092 75 


19 


Frauen Verein ' 




- 


- 


- 


20 


Frederick E. Weber Charities Corporation, The 


465,246 16 


- 


- 


1,745 96 


21 


Free Home for Consumptives in the City of 












Boston 


- 


- 


3,096 50 


- 


22 


French Benevolent and Relief Association . 


300 00 


- 


2 00 


- 


23 


PYench Women's Christian Association 


7,250 00 


3,000 00 


112 75 


3,786 95 


24 


German Aid Society of Boston .... 


41,300 83 




724 00 


- 


2o 


German Ladies' Aid Society of Boston 




_ 


591 85 


- 


26 


German Ladies' Aid Society of Boston (Altenheim 












Fund) 


87,849 37 


- 


2,568 58 


10,827 83 


27 


Girls' Friendly Society Home .... 


15,165 00 


- 


4,389 88 


4,645 11 


28 


Good Will House Association .... 


- 


_ 


7,221 73 


- 


29 


Good Will Industries of America, Inc. ' 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


30 


Grand Masters and Wardens of the Alpha Grand 
Lodge, .Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of 












Ma.ssachusetts ....... 


20,700 00 


9,600 00 


200 00 


10 00 


31 


Greater Boston Association of Guardians of the 












Camp Fire Girls 


1,200 00 


650 00 


1,582 52 


6,557 08 


32 


Greater Boston Hebrew Ladies Aid Association' 






- 


- 


33 


Greek Ladies' Benevolent Society of Boston ' 


- 


- 


- 


- 


34 


Guild of St. Apollonia, Inc. .... 


2,000 00 


- 


2,783 00 


1,285 00 


35 


Guildof St. Elizabeth, The* .... 


- 


- 


- 


- 


46 


1 Hahnemann Hospital 


46,100 21 


- 


- 


- 


37 


' Hale House .Association 


111,814 31 


- 


19,107 61 


- 


38 


i Harriet Tubman House, Inc 


13,000 00 


4,000 00 


1,766 77 


2,333 15 


39 


1 Haverhill College Club, (Incorporated) 


- 


- 


8 32 


401 50 


40 


! Hearth Pan-Albanian Federation of America 


18,316 60 


- 


32,532 94 


5,793 65 


41 


Hebrew Chesed Shel Emas of the South End of 












Boston' 


- 


- 


- 


- 


42 


Hebrew Free Loan Society, The .... 


100,785 87 


- 


11,771 05 


186,703 98 


43 


Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, The' 


- 


- 


- 


- 


44 


Hebrew Industrial School 


66,215 65 


- 


6,223 00 


- 


45 


! Hebrew Ladies Free Loan Association of Roxbury 


2,000 00 


- 


1,651 57 


11,503 78 


46 


1 Hebrew Ladies' Mosher Zekainim Association . 


92,000 00 


- 


52,908 66 


9,316 12 


47 


1 Hebrew Women's Sewing Society 


10,050 00 


- 


2 00 


- 


48 


j Hellenic .A.ssociation Patria ' . . . . 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


49 


Helping Hand Society "Dania" 


- 


- 


155 95 


- 


50 


! Holy Child Day Nursery, The 


3,200 00 


- 


526 74 


266 50 


51 


Holy Trinity Catholic School and Society . 


- 


- 


1,355 50 


4,325 00 


52 


Home for Aged Colored Women .... 


234,656 67 


- 


1,253 05 


563 83 


53 


Home for Aged Couples 


1,463,399 26 


- 


981 00 


5.500 00 


54 


Home for Aged Men 


760,495 01 


- 


- 


- 


55 


1 Home for .A.ged W^omen 


1,245,209 82 


- 


1.469 48 


958 19 


56 


1 Home for Destitute Catholic Children in Boston 


435,979 32 


- 


37,592 72 


- 


57 


Home for .lev. ish Children' 


- 


- 


- 


- 


58 


Home for Italian Children, Incorporated' . 
Household Nursing Association, The . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


59 


21,000 00 


14,500 00 


9,664 25 


8,401 79 



' No report. 



Report not due. 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



73 



Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



Interest. 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 


Legacies 
specifically 
restricted 
to Capital 


Unrestricted 
Legacies 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 

Number 

aided 


Total 

Number 

Free 


Number 

of 

Families 

aided 




S2,661 10 

15,148 09 

31,611 05 

40 08 

17.515 75 

3,099 74 


?9.324 98 

75 00 
8,332 40 


$2,126 45 

72,440 97 
6,428 64 

463 21 


522,271 65 

5.243 48 

106,493 22 

52,157 86 

5,445 33 

99,066 92 

302,792 65 


$3,897 46 

597 59 

82,639 63 

20,033 08 

1,900 00 

-3 

19,054 18 


9 

2 

67 
22 

1 
68 

9 


335 

1,374 

87 

225 
1,347 

15 2 


30 
1,374 

222 

64 


4,154 
29 


2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 


25 97 


- 


- 


1,470 50 


309 65 


3 


6 


- 


1 


11 


7,825 43 

S5,358 81 

1.563 13 


1,352 35 


7,362 32 
1,300 00 


30,345 08 

109,351 45 

1,882 48 


14,316 14 

-3 


16 

84 


617 
812 
800 


558 
22 
800 

} 203 


- 


12 
13 
14 


1,934 11 


- 


17,316 18 


70,791 83 


31,584 26 


35 


f 242 
1 2,256 


350 


15 


1,948 82 
1.752 22 
5,083 82 


1,000 00 
5,000 00 


- 


55 00 

308,551 64 

7,501 48 


139,675 86 
75 00 


150 


825 
50 


- 


- 


16 
17 

18 
19 


22,143 29 


- 


- 


22,459 56 


3,950 00 


- 


/ 82 

\ 83 


} S3 


29 


20 


- 


- 


3,281 02 


6,389 17 


1,354 27 


4 


175 


175 

} - 


- 


21 


12 78 


- 


- 


160 40 


- 


- 


/ 12 
201 

12 


- 


22 


2,230 28 
943 39 


1,000 00 


1,655 00 


3,999 80 
3,341 77 
1,058 94 


1,170 70 

600 00 

90 00 


2 

1 


201 


318 
13 


23 
24 
25 


1,746 38 
581 77 


- 


1,500 00 


7,438 73 
8,447 96 
7,134 81 


2,266 60 
2,547 37 
3,854 40 


4 
8 
8 


23 

392 

1,500 


16 
1,500 


150 


26 
27 
28 
29 


1,350 00 


- 


600 00 


3,606 68 


230 00 


2 


{ i' 


} 20 


21 


30 


760 99 


: 


- 


9,680 83 


2,066 33 


2 


997 


19 


- 


31 
32 


_ 


- 


- 


4,479 39 


2,780 00 


2 


8,693 


8,693 


~ 


33 

34 


2.583 66 
13,004 59 

13 67 


- 


13,250 00 


2,583 66 

24,448 23 

4,051 10 

GOO 00 


- 3 

10,727 54 
717 00 


" 


1,000 
90 


400 
2 


15 


60 

36 
37 
38 
39 


1,732 34 


- 


- 


55.704 96 


17,290 49 


16 


f 32 

1 18 


} - 


2 


40 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


41 


69 72 


- 


- 


8.269 50 


5,649 68 


4 


45,000 


45,000 


- 


42 
43 


2,510 10 

90 00 

90 48 

515 63 


- 


1,000 00 

2,602 26 
1,000 00 


9.183 00 
13.754 12 
64.992 58 

1.909 35 


6,311 00 

100 00 

13,538 03 

515 10 


13 

1 

12 


1,271 
285 
134 
320 


1,271 
134 


- 


44 
45 
46 
47 


13 39 
5 80 


- 


- 


245 94 
2.066 12 
6.484 51 


840 00 
946 00 


2 
4 


2,816 
41 


151 

8 


6 


'to 

49 
50 
51 


10,768 59 


- 


4,000 00 


13,575 37 


3,466 24 


6 


83^ 


} 65 


- 


52 


62,597 37 


9,563 00 


2,764 95 


45,256 24 


11,692 54 


22 


- 


53 


41.946 43 


- 


11.465 32 


59,599 72 


16,812 49 


20 


{ 130 

87 

3,170 


\ 130 
3,170 


- 


54 


49.976 72 
12,092 03 


5,500 94 


4,900 00 
21,715 95 


66,976 80 
47,278 83 


19,385 47 
9,251 00 


29 
13 


- 


55 
56 
57 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


58 


860 79 


~ 


- 


18.645 78 


9,539 17 


11 


1,143 


- 


927 


59 



Organizations aided. 



* Not separately reported. 



DEPART:\IEXT of public welfare. [P. D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 


Incum- 


Subscrip- 


Earnings 






Property 


brances on 


tions, Dona- 


and 






reported 


Real Estate 


tions, etc. 


Refunds 




Boston — Con. 










1 


House of the Angel Guardian .... 


S487,302 43 


- 


$29,522 64 


$73,658 24 


2 


House of the Good Samaritan .... 


485,232 00 


- 


14,906 53 


12,734 52 


3 


House of the Good Shepherd .... 


469,900 00 


- 


9,203 00 


89,811 60 


4 


Howard Benevolent Society .... 


565,832 00 


- 


50 00 


- 


5 


Humane Society of the Commonwealth of Mas- 












sachusetts 


287,355 64 


- 


- 


- 


6 


Hunt -Asylum for Destitute Children 


44,842 76 


_ 


12 00 


_ 


7 


Huntington Institute for Orphan Children 


221,586 57 


- 




- 


8 


Immigrants Home ...... 


43,000 00 


- 


3,222 90 


1,522 55 


9 


Industrial Aid Society 


64,601 35 


_ 


3,191 00 


- 


10 


Industrial School for Crippled and Deformed 












Children ........ 


1,033,717 27 


- 


10,629 05 


- 


11 


Industrial School for Girls 


146,523 83 


- 


246 00 


1,841 50 


12 


Infants' Hospital' 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


13 


Institution of the Little Sisters of the Poor 


104,100 00 


- 


8,417 79 


- 


14 


Instructive District Nursing Association 


356,343 49 


- 


120,193 33 


81,002 65 


15 


Irwin Fund, Trustees of the . . 


- 


- 


3,505 27 


- 


16 


Isaac Alberts Memorial Aid Association' 


- 


- 


- 


- 


17 


Italian Evangelical Mission of Hyde Park, Mas- 












sachusetts, Inc., The' 


— 


— 


— 


— 


18 


Jacoby Club of Boston 


- 


- 


2,729 60 


1,077 87 


19 


Jamaica Plain Community Conference' 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


20 


Jamaica Plain Dispensary 


22,719 40 


- 


- 


102 85 


21 


Jamaica Plain Friendly Society .... 


- 


- 


2,084 77 


- 


22 


Jamaica Plain Neighborhood House Association 


13,085 54 


$2,000 00 


3,679 55 


1,224 36 


23 


Jewish Anti-Tuberculosis Association' 


— 


— 


— 


— 


24 


Jewish Children's Aid Society .... 


500 00 


- 


3,924 27 


21 45 


25 


Jewish Legion of Massachusetts, Inc. . 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


26 


Jewish Maternity Clinic Association . 


3,500 00 


2,750 00 


1,853 71 


1,232 45 


27 


John Boylston's Charitable Donations for the 
Benefit and Support of Aged Poor Persons, and 












of Orphans and Deserted Children, Trustees of 


204,400 00 


- 


- 


25 00 


28 


John Howard Industrial Home .... 


60,356 02 


- 


3,940 30 


- 


29 


Judge Baker Foundation 


12,701 50 


- 


10,590 00 


6,599 50 


30 Keith Fund, Inc 


110,045 00 


- 


- 


- 


31 1 Ladies Auxiliary of the Jewish Peoples Institute, 












Inc., The 


- 


- 


1,568 99 


- 


32 


Ladies' Auxiliary to Company L, Sixth Regiment, 












Massachusetts National Guard, Inc. 


- 


- 


379 75 


— 


33 


Ladies Benevolent Circle of the Clarendon Street 












Baptist Church 


9,700 00 


- 


24 50 


- 


34 


Ladies' Helping Hand Auxiliary to the Home 










! for Destitute Jew ish Children .... 


- 


- 


2,431 30 


5,690 78 


35 


Ladies' Kennel Association of Massachusetts' . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


36 


Ladies Lyceum Union 


- 


- 


512 53 


723 02 


37 


Ladies' Unity Club 


10,000 00 


- 


5,569 08 


677 88 


38 


Lawrence Avenue Free Loan Association ' . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


39 


League of Women for Community Service . 


11,500 00 


- 


5,987 11 


425 67 


40 


Lend a Hand Society 


67,952 61 


- 


6,948 38 


167 80 


41 


Leopold Morse Home for Infirm Hebrews and 












Orphanage 


96,043 93 


- 


- 


- 


42 


Lincoln House Association 


150,934 66 


- 


24,337 50 


4,791 95 


43 


Little House, Inc., The 


5,271 20 


_ 


4,085 43 


62 03 


44 


Lord's Day League of New England . 


105,058 17 


- 


13,431 35 


- 


45 


Lucy Stone Home, The 


10,600 00 


- 


1,313 54 


- 


46 


Lutheran Immigrant Board, The 


23,800 00 


- 


3,491 25 


5,416 35 


47 


Marie Dewing Faelton Charitable Association, 












Inc. . 


100 00 


- 


4,206 48 


100 00 


48 


Masonic Education and Charity Trust 


1,103,153 41 


- 


286 40 


81 94 


49 


Massachusetts .Association for Promoting the 












Interests of the Adult Blind .... 


97,482 37 


- 


6,736 00 


2,641 52 


50 


Massachusetts Baptist Charitable Society 


266,363 89 


- 


1,532 87 


30 81 


51 


Massachusetts Baptist Convention 


910,637 69 


- 


74,252 79 


- 


52 


Massachusetts Charitable Eye and Ear Infirmary 


1,180,455 38 


- 


16,054 41 


231,792 92 


53 


Mas.sachusetts Charitable Fire Society 


58,805 13 


- 


- 


- 


54 


Massachusetts Charitable Fire Society (Summer 












Street Fire Fund) 


42,926 70 


- 


- 


- 


55 


Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Association 


425,236 88 


- 


1,508 50 


- 


56 


Massachusetts Charitable Society 


181,981 29 


~ 


" 


■ 



No report. 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



75 



Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



Interest, 

Dividends. 

Annuities 

and Rentals 


Legacies 
specifically 
restricted 
to Capital 


Unrestricted 
Legacies 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 

Number 

aided 


Total 

Number 

Free 


Number 

of 

Families 

aided 




$7,788 13 

26,335 68 

410 46 

27,899 84 


$100 00 


$7,802 36 

4,906 17 
2,000 00 


179,432 87 
55,677 11 

101,333 15 
22,404 16 


$3,680 00 

_3 

11,459 70 
1,301 25 


4 

34 

9 

1 


710 
283 
380 


225 
180 
380 


627 


1 
2 
3 
4 


15,308 80 

1,549 05 

11,305 29 

3,833 74 


25,141 67 


- 


19,139 66 
1,542 00 

11,270 00 
4,671 56 
8,762 15 


5,677 30 
25 00 

1,959 19 
5,650 67 


20 

5 
5 


42 

34 

2,362 
454 


34 

803 
454 


10 


5 
6 

7 
8 
9 


39,053 50 
10,425 53 


1,000 00 


31,172 30 


43,255 62 
10,799 20 


23,772 98 
2,680 00 


51 
5 


186 
31 


186 
11 


1 
25 


10 
11 
12 


25 46 

17.837 08 

74 76 


13,494 83 


12,383 10 


23,055 00 

228,730 98 

4,799 00 


192,986 76 


133 


240 
34,805 

212 


240 
14,293 


3 


13 
14 
15 
16 


11 73 


- 


- 


4,132 17 


2,345 00 


1 


202 


202 


- 


17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 


992 50 
129 66 
614 68 


- 


- 


1,035 47 
2,438 09 
5,561 15 


500 00 

278 00 

3,432 70 


2 
3 


846 
1,000 


846 


39 


10 24 


~ 


- 


4,022 35 

129 25 

3,086 16 


1,904 93 


3 


150 

22 

263 


150 
123 


~ 


7,302 79 

3,684 30 

1,237 C3 

168 28 


- 


1,000 00 


8,245 00 
5,027 53 
14,972 43 
3,450 00 


2,400 00 
11,881 51 


1 
5 


64 

12 2 


64 


- 


27 
28 
29 
30 


- 


- 


- 


1,705 34 


- 


- 


12 


~ 


- 


31 


- 


- 


- 


379 75 


- 


- 


f 22 

1 57 


\ 

i 


7 


32 


672 17 


- 


- 


608 26 


52 00 


1 


- 


- 


- 


33 


268 19 


- 


250 00 


9,906 81 


661 80 


- 


- 


- 


- 


34 
35 
36 
37 


113 13 


_ 


: 


1,201 56 
6,255 35 


214 95 
2,264 00 


19 
4 


14 
10 


- 


4 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


38 


12 20 


- 


- 


3,902 79 


1,213 53 


2 


/ 82 

t 2.550 


1 I.OOO 

1 '^ 


10 


39 


2,990 11 


- 


2,665 32 


8,971 25 


3,945 64 


3 


/ 232 
I 158 


2 


40 


4,877 32 


- 


- 


5,090 00 


50 00 


1 


12 


_ 


- 


41 


3,785 38 


- 


4,998 50 


33,771 05 


22,335 33 


18 


{ 900 

2,881 
2,755 


} 100 

2,881 
^977 




42 


83 36 
6,058 87 

378 79 


172 69 


4,783 32 


4,340 39 
11,275 17 

1,313 54 
10,189 30 


3,397 51 
6,834 14 

3,190 00 


2 
5 

6 




43 
44 
45 
46 


23 70 
47,305 21 


114,140 20 


- 


590 55 
30,189 08 


100 00 
1,090 00 


2 


19 


- 


- 


47 
48 


435 59 

12,549 93 

41,879 43 

29,488 06 

2,566 67 


1,196 46 

14,312 82 

75 00 


50,000 00 
3,600 OC 


58,844 84 

15,422 80 

104,521 36 

248,927 86 

3,453 43 


4,238 24 

500 00 

20,960 00 

-3 

300 00 


6 

8 

209 

3 


240 
6,476 


37 

_ 

392 


- 


49 
50 
51 
52 
53 


1,743 84 

143,487 29 

8,311 29 


- 


- 


3,988 04 

138,022 51 

7,616 10 


50 00 

32,454 66 

600 00 


1 
19 


25 

7 


'-- 


: 


54 
55 
56 



2 Organizations aided. 



Not separately reported. 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 


Incum- 


Subscrip- 


Earnings 






Property 


brances on 


tions, Dona- 


and 


_ 




reported 


Real Estate 


tions, etc. 


Refunds 




Boston — Con. 










1 


Massachusetts Child Labor Committee (In- 












corp>orated) 


- 


- 


$10,972 10 


- 


2 


Massjichusetts Congregational Charitable Society 


1253,450 24 


- 


1,000 00 


- 


3 


Massachusetts Division of the International Sun- 












shine Society ....... 


_ 


- 


12 00 


- 


4 


Massachusetts General Hospital, Fruit St., Bos- 












ton; McLean Hospital, Belmont 


10,442,765 89 


- 


67.443 41 


$1,524,382 39 


5 


Massachusetts Health Company 


- 


- 


- 


2,236 15 


6 


Massachusetts Home ...... 


58.410 00 


116,000 00 


7.245 52 


36,764 82 


7 


Massachusetts Home Missionary Society 


362,439 08 


- 


122,452 16 


54,103 43 


8 


Massachusetts Homoeopathic Hospital 


2,412.700 33 


16,000 00 


2,360 00 


391,094 06 


9 


Massachusetts League of Girls' Clubs, Incorpo- 












rated 


7.423 09 


- 


12,415 01 


1,222 90 


10 


Massachusetts Lying-in Hospital 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


11 


Ma.ssachusetts Maternity and Foundling Hospital 












Corporation '....... 


— 


— 


— 


— 


12 


Massachusetts Medical Benevolent Society 


74,800 00 


- 


231 00 


- 


13 


Massachusetts No License League • . . . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


14 


Massachusetts Prison Association 


22,476 47 


_ 


1,767 00 


- 


15 


Massachusetts Pythian Sisters Home Association 


4,100 00 


- 


521 73 


1.166 81 


16 


Massachusetts Royal Arcanum Hospital Fund 












Association, Inc 


- 


- 


1.337 31 


- 


17 


Massachusetts Society for Aiding Discharged 












I^risoners 


88,582 29 


- 


131 00 


- 


18 


Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of 












Cruelty to Animals 


788.372 23 


- 


31,092 42 


64,050 85 


19 


Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of 












Cruelty to Children 


453,234 63 


25,000 00 


94,167 57 


- 


20 


Massachusetts Society for the University Educa- 












tion of Women 


26,290 68 


- 


544 00 


460 00 


21 


Massachusetts Teachers' Federation . 


- 


- 


7.100 60 


2.182 37 


22 


Massachusetts Temperance Society 


17,700 00 


_ 


_ 


_ 


23 


Massachusetts Trustees of the International Com- 
mittee of the Young Men's Christian Associa- 












tion for Army and Navy Work, Inc. 


266,165 07 


- 


700,836 25 


96.890 31 


24 


Massachusetts Woman's Christian Temperance 












Union 


10,000 00 


- 


9,933 35 


2,878 49 


25 


Massachusetts Women's Hospital 


36,600 00 


- 


- 


- 


26 


Massasoit Memorial Association .... 


- 


- 


3,747 83 


1.637 10 


27 


Maverick Dispensary of East Boston, The 


- 


- 


5,931 50 


5,651 59 


28 


Merrimac Mission, Inc., The 


- 


- 


4.882 76 


- 


29 


Michael Anagnos Schools 


254,433 94 


- 


- 


- 


30 


Millennium Guild 


- 


- 


73 50 


150 75 


31 


Morgan Memorial Co-Operative Industries and 












Stores, Inc., The 


501.129 86 


- 


133.777 37 


236,896 20 


32 


Mount Lebanon Club 1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


33 


Mount Moriah Hebrew School of Dorchester. Inc. ^ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


34 


Mount Pleasant Home, The .... 


127,662 91 


_ 


3.465 00 


18,414 34 


35 


Mount Sinai Hospital Society of Boston, Mass. ' 


- 


- 


- 


- 


36 


National Pan-Epirotic Union in .America ' . 


— 


— 


— 


— 


37 


Needlewoman's Friend Society, The . 


50,910 00 


- 


206 50 


5,743 17 


38 


New Dorchester Hebrew School Association, The i 


- 


- 


- 


- 


39 


New England Anti-\'ivisection Society 


47,500 00 


- 


1,349 95 


40 95 


40 


New England Association for the Benefit of the 
Orphans and the Disabled Soldiers of the War 












in France 1 


— 


— 


— 


~ 


41 


New England Baptist Hospital .... 


144,100 00 


- 


2,061 63 


82,590 97 


42 


New England Branch of the Woman's Foreign 
Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal 












Church 


43,950 88 


- 


91.949 35 


- 


43 


New England Deaconess Association (excluding 












hospitals) 


445.877 90 


- 


7,863 75 


20,379 86 


44 


New England Deaconess Association (Hospital 












in Boston) 


419,496 56 


106,000 00 


779 39 


119,032 00 


45 


New England Deaconess Association, Palmer 












Memorial Hospital for Incurables 


4,445 00 


- 


9,197 78 


31.384 67 


46 


New England District of the Christian and Mis- 












sionary .Alliance, Inc 


7,250 00 


— 


2,000 81 


— 


47 


New England Grenfell Association 


110,671 08 


- 


26,433 00 


65,339 72 


48 


New England Home for Little Wanderers . 


1,345,776 08 


- 


31,882 13 


39,475 43 



1 No report. 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



77 



Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



Annuities restricted 
and Rentals to Capital 



Legacies 

specifically 

restricted 



Unrestricted 
Legacies 



Current 
Expenditures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Average 

Number I Total 
of Paid Number 

Em- aided 
ployees I 



Total 

Number 

Free 



Number 

of 

Families 
aided 



$168,021 47 



15,000 00 



,688 00 
,463 00 
.802 00 



3,000 00 
1,745 00 

1,900 00 



1,600 00 



2,300 00 
3,200 00 



$5,499 96 



55,514 70 
75,687 34 



2,403 65 



12,226 



500 00 



1,000 00 



5,826 15 



S10,351 72 
13,918 52 

5 00 

,886,179 85 

2,227 15 

43,429 48 

202,473 60 

547,586 85 

16,325 61 



9,866 56 

2,920 91 
204 60 

1,076 32 

2,840 69 

164,457 79 

163,631 75 

5,174 27 
6,819 87 

578 85 

96,037 60 

16,540 23 
2,060 08 

14,663 28 

11,568 54 
5,593 32 

13,083 74 
145 62 

318,923 03 

25,704 90 

10,902 59 
4,678 34 



90,846 71 

110,600 31 

54,241 91 

128,275 71 

49,077 85 

1,170 16 

32,696 97 

134,765 17 



$6,071 11 
300 00 



1,820 00 
21,230 37 
12,508 50 

-3 

7,682 37 



2,040 00 

150 00 

1,000 00 

47,504 96 

114,785 69 

1,450 00 

37,253 25 
4,592 00 

-3 

668 00 
7,782 67 
3,233 00 

87,264 90 

8,524 51 

2,050 00 
1,837 75 



750 00 
17,992 10 

-3 



1,808 00 
61,697 14 



3 


12 

50 


- 


1,172 
2 

37 

9 

437 

3 


36,994 
768 
67 

142 2 
10,546 
/ 362 
I 5,798 


1,759 

56 
19 

966 

} : 


- 


22 


- 


2 


30 


- 


2 


38 


- 


1 


842 


842 


50 


- 


- 


84 


11,697 


11,697 


4 


/ 1112 

1 3,000 

72 


} : 


25 


150,000 


- 


3 


- 


- 


11 
3 


16,430 
14,053 


2,005 
14,053 


- 


32 


- 


101 


3,880 


1,999 


8 


42 


: 


2 


125 


125 


2 


- 


- 


70 


1,098 


79 


2 


- 


- 


10 


80 


30 


113 


1,807 


96 


35 

2 
60 


93 

{ r 

12 
/ 252 
1 755 


} ; 

} 178 



Organizations aided. 



Not separately reported. 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 


Incum- 


Subscrip- 


Earnings 






Property 


brances on 


tions, Dona- 


and 






reported 


Real Estate 


tions, etc. 


Refunds 




Boston — Con. 










1 


New England Hospital for Women and Children 


$1,093,442 16 


- 


$6,648 78 


$89,383 68 


2 


New England Kurn Hattin Homes . 


- 


- 


1,396 85 


_ 


3 


New England Moral Reform Society . 


191.635 92 


- 


16,626 94 


16,151 18 


4 


New England Peabody Home for Crippled 












Children 


1,138,579 76 


$30,000 00 


3,952 38 


610 65 


5 


New England Watch and Ward Society 


157,875 82 


- 


8,644 13 


_ 


6 


Newsboys' Heaciing lioom Association 


8,920 59 


_ 


897 00 


87 60 


7 


Nickerson Home for Children .... 


29,123 55 


- 


2,401 90 


4,215 50 


8 


Norfolk House Centre 


107,277 20 


_ 


11,336 72 




9 


North Bennet Street Industrial School 


114,275 18 


- 


26,327 00 


12,932 12 


10 


North End Diet Kitchen 


39,651 84 


- 


2,517 50 


1,213 02 


11 


North End DisjxMisary ' 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


12 


Norwegian Mission Home 


10.500 00 


10,311 00 


1,641 55 


2,789 92 


13 


Norwegian Old People's Home and Charitable 












Association of Greater Boston .... 


17,013 41 


- 


2,546 20 


4,715 50 


14 


Novogradvolinsk Relief Association of Massa- 












chusetts 


- 


- 


4,597 43 




15 


Nutrition Clinics for Delicate Children, Inc. 


- 


- 


8,860 00 


10,617 97 


16 


Oliver Ditson Society for the Relief of Needy 












Musicians ........ 


34,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


17 


Ostriner Aid Association, Inc.' .... 


- 


_ 


- 


_ 


18 


Overseers of the Poor of the Town of Boston in the 












Province of Massachusetts Bay in New England 


1,375,832 64 


- 


- 


2,088 00 


19 


Pan-Hellenic Union in America .... 


40,000 00 


28,500 00 


504 53 


- 


20 


Particular Coimcil Society St. Vincent de Paul of 












the City of Boston, The' 


- 


- 


- 


- 


21 


Permanent Charity Fund, Incorporated, Com- 












mittee of The 


4,334,682 68 


- 


- 


- 


22 


Permanent Peace Fund, Trustees of . 


135,582 97 


_ 


- 


_ 


23 


Peter Bent Brigham Hospital .... 


6,469,661 38 


- 


7,975 00 


273,464 14 


24 


Phileducational Association of Georgitsiotes 












"Socrates" 


- 


- 


9,318 58 


714 00 


25 


Piatker Relief Association, Inc.' 


- 


- 


- 


- 


26 


Portuguese Immigrant Aid Society of the United 












States of America, Inc., The .... 


172 00 


- 


- 


- 


27 


Preachers' Aid Society of the New England An- 
nual Conference of the Methodist Episcopal 












Church 


420,983 35 


- 


- 


- 


28 


Pultusker Benevolent Association ' . . . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


29 


Reconstruction Association, Inc. 


- 


- 


- 


- 


30 


Red Mogein Dovid Bureau of New England, Inc., 












or Red Shield of David, Inc' . . . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


31 


Robert B. Brigham Hospital for Incurables 


1,645,455 00 


- 


- 


66,651 38 


32 


Robert Gould Shaw House, Inc. 


500 00 


- 


8,433 32 


81 50 


33 


Robert Treat Paine Association, The . 


136,928 40 


- 


- 


- 


34 


Rotch Travelling Scholarship, Inc. . 


79,904 53 


- 


- 


- 


35 


Roxbury Boys' Club and Institute of Industry . 


91,945 44 


10,000 00 


5,033 71 


10,011 03 


36 


Roxbury Charitable Society .... 


178,966 81 


- 


340 00 


- 


37 


Roxbury Female Benevolent Society . 


9,668 87 


- 


11 00 


1,469 67 


38 


Roxbury Hebrew Free School Association i 


- 


- 


- 


- 


39 


Roxbury Home for Aged Women 


312,995 01 


- 


863 57 


3.670 95 


40 


Roxbury Ladies' Aid and Fuel Society 


- 


- 


14,375 63 


25 00 


41 


Roxbury Ladies' Bikur Cholim Association 


- 


- 


3,850 57 


- 


42 


Roxbury Ladies' Club 


- 


- 


373 74 


73 98 


43 


Roxbury Neighborhood House Association 


49,000 00 


- 


10,137 16 


2,702 79 


44 


Rufus F. Dawes Hotel As,sociation 


116,600 00 


- 


- 


9,208 81 


45 


Ruggles Street Neighborhood House . 


13,300 00 


- 


- 


- 


46 


St Elizabeth's Hospital of Boston 


635,000 00 


25,481 14 


33,580 05 


190,030 60 


47 


St. Elizabeth's Hospital Nurses' Alumnae As- 












sociation, Inc 


- 


- 


113 00 


88 20 


48 


St. Joseph's Association of Boston 


5,000 00 


- 


760 00 


- 


49 


St. Joseph's Home 


35,962 69 


5,000 00 


367 42 


12,791 94 


50 


St. Luke's Home for Convalescents 


244,884 29 


- 


2,899 52 


1,849 01 


51 


St. Mary's Infant Asylum and Lying-in Hospital 


173,885 58 


5,000 00 


14.105 62 


91,145 35 


52 


St. Vincent's Orphans Asylum' .... 


- 


- 


- 


- 


53 


Salvation Army of Massachusetts, Inc. 


2,706,587 89 


782,546 91 


124,356 68 


283,042 88 


54 


Sanders Fund, Inc. * 




_ 


- 


- 


55 


Scientific Temperance Federation 


4,622 50 


- 


5,911 45 


1,372 26 


56 


Scots' Charitable Society 


58,916 27 


~ 


730 00 


" 



No report. 



* Report not due. 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



79 



Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



Interest, 
Dividends, 

Annuities 
and Rentals 


Legacies 
specifically 
restricted 
to Capital 


Unrestricted 
Legacies 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 

Number 

aided 


Total 

Number 

Free 


Number 

of 

Families 

aided 




$32,443 50 
5,128 07 


S15,000 00 
1.000 00 


- 


$150,286 15 

1,393 49 

34,037 52 


_3 

1439 49 
14,045 28 


89 

1 

22 


1,613 
100 
363 


118 
181 


- 


1 
2 
3 


47,536 35 
8,034 38 
763 31 
157 08 
7,645 33 
3,061 95 
1,606 30 


2.275 00 


Si ,000 00 
3,500 00 


17,443 73 
17,563 51 
2,284 03 
6,648 57 
24.349 42 
45.799 89 
4.862 29 


6,928 83 

10,883 51 

910 00 

1,457 24 

12,422 39 

31,263 23 

732 75 


23 
5 
3 
4 
36 
48 
2 


70 

550 
66 

1,650 
362 


36 

13 
642 


287 


4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 


- 


- 


- 


4 54 63 


797 06 


2 


285 


3 




485 07 


- 


- 


732 34 


- 


- 


30 


30 


- 


13 


12 88 
27 25 


- 


- 


6.478 90 
17.703 82 


_3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


14 
15 


1,917 35 


- 


- 


2,018 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


25 


16 
17 


31,562 37 
6,716 43 


- 


~ 


22,749 85 
3,221 49 


405 00 


■ 2 


215 


215 


- 


18 
19 

on 


217,477 92 
9,245 66 

208,116 eo 


1,000 00 


- 


224,441 43 

9.245 66 

508.200 46 


6,930 00 
750 00 

_3 


2 

2 

350 


992 
12 
4,315 


800 


- 


21 
22 
23 


365 78 


- 


- 


1,609 94 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


24 
25 


21,221 78 


26,192 50 


- 


21,984 54 


323 50 


1 


114 


: 


- 


26 

27 
28 
29 


256,299 40 

25 20 

9,731 25 

3,442 10 

714 83 

8,472 44 


6,445 44 


28,423 84 


96,974 33 
7,736 64 

12,718 46 
4,232 80 

27,885 87 
7,149 32 


-3 

4,340 96 
732 00 

7,189 86 


36 
8 
3 

2 


600 
3 


50 
3 


300 
164 


30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 


682 89 


- 


- 


1,111 21 


- 


- 


1 33 


} ; 


- 


37 


13, 423*85 

857 72 
5 20 

79 24 

111 00 

300 00 

10,744 48 


3,000 00 


38,676 40 


19,004 74 

13,620 84 

2,972 77 

447 72 

14,309 99 

7,920 49 

55 27 

236,022 74 


5,174 68 
836 70 

30 00 
9,876 39 
4,447 08 

24 45 

_3 


7 
1 

5 

16 
10 

196 


26 
13 = 
155 

42 

33,231 
12 
4,042 


155 
1,730 


- 


38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 


16 61 


_ 


_ 


113 32 
804 60 


: 


: 


: 


- 


40 


47 

48 


271 04 


- 


- 


13,155 21 


1,779 00 


10 


/ 32 

I 246 
290 
202 


} « 

136 
70 


3 


49 


9.332 60 
2,075 67 


5,038 93 


6,075 43 


21,199 07 
101,428 55 


9,134 47 
24,128 20 


16 

9 


- 


50 
51 
52 


902 25 


298,131 92 


- 


413,178 85 


105,465 93 


209 


/ 272 
1363,142 


} 183.646 


6,103 


53 


316 18 
3,127 94 


- 


- 


8,138 27 
4,063 87 


5,176 26 


4 


1,921 


203 


142 


54 
55 
56 



2 Organizations aided. 



3 Not separately reported. 



80 



DEPARTMENT OE PUBLIC WELEARE. [P. D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Total 
Property 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 



Subscrip 
tions, Dona- 
tions, etc 



Boston — Con. 

Sears and other Funds, Trustees of 

Sedalia Club Inc., The 

Seraphic Institute, Inc. of Boston, Mass.' . 

Shaw Fund for Mariners' Children 

Society for Helping Destitute Mothers and Infants 

S(X'iety for Ministerial Relief . . . . 

Society for the Relief of Aged or Disabled Episco- 
pal Clergymen ....... 

Society for the Relief of the Widows and Orphans 
of Clergymen of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church 

Society of St. Margaret (St. Monica's Home) 

Soldiers and Sailors Relief Society of Ward 18 
Boston 1 ...... . 

South Bo.ston Lithuanian Benevolent Society 

South Boston Neighborhood House . 

South Boston Samaritan Society 

South End Day Nursery ..... 

South End Day Nursery Auxiliary . 

South End Diet Kitchen 

South End Dispensary and Hospital . 

South End House Association, The 

South End Music School .... 

Stamp Saving Society 

Students' House Corporation ... 

Sunnyside Day Nursery ' . 

Swedish Home of Peace ("Fridhem") 

Swiss Benevolent Society . . . . , 

Syrian Burial Society 1 .... 

Syrian Ladies' Aid Society, The 

Syrian National Society, The i . . . 

Tabernacle Society of Boston, The 

Temporary Home for Working Women ^ 

Tide Over League, Inc 

Travelers' Aid Society of Boston, Inc. 

Tremont Dispensary, The .... 

Trinity Church Home for the Aged (Rachel L 
Allen Memorial) ..... 

Trinity Neighborhood House and Day Nursery 

Union Beige Benevolent Association, Inc. . 

Union Reserve Mission .... 

Unitarian Campaign, Inc 

Unitarian Service Pension Society 

United Hebrew Benevolent Association of Boston 

Vernon Advent Christian Home 

Vincent Memorial Hospital .... 

War Service .Xs-sociation, Div. 20 

Washingtonian Home 

Welcome House, Inc. • 

Wells Memorial Association .... 

West End Matan Basaiser Charitable Association 

West End Young Men's Hebrew Association i 

Widows' Society in Boston, The . 

Winchester Home for Aged Women 

Woman's -Auxiliary of the New England Baptist 
Hospital ....... 

Woman's Auxiliary Board of the Scots' Charitable 
Society . . . . . . - 

Woman's Board of Missions (Congregational) 

Woman's Charity Club .... 

Woman's Home Missionary Association 

Woman's Home Missionary Society of the New 
England Conference of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church 



Woman's Seaman's Friend Society 

Woman's Univeraalist Missionary Society of Mas 

sachusetts . . . . . 

Women's Educational and Industrial Union 
Women's Educational and Industrial Union 

Trustees of 
Women's Industrial Association of Roxbury 



$190,164 01 

597,876 13 
292,170 27 
156,000 00 



221,206 33 
24,169 27 



11,100 00 

1,000 00 
43,625 75 

55,968 84 

92,262 75 

47,000 00 

7.712 50 

69,600 00 

16,000 00 
1,100 00 



25,531 25 

2,925 00 

91,500 00 
16,030 00 

76,480 00 

20,050 00 

7,500 00 

313,163 46 

136,149 46 

61,100 00 



260,900 75 
210,048 02 



10,397 75 
370,182 41 

43,100 00 
114,496 81 



28,000 00 
14,552 45 

36,996 80 



$4,000 00 



10,000 00 
4,000 00 



27,000 00 
8,000 00 



55,000 00 
6,000 00 



4,000 00 
10,000 00 



$1,269 62 



e,847 93 



1,230 00 

2,383 92 

8 00 

4,199 00 

710 15 

2,419 00 

8,277 50 

3l,7i)() 50 

7,407 08 

450 00 

302 73 
195 45 

1,186 82 

910 51 

6,615 87 
20,653 98 



927 00 

4,677 84 

131 85 

11,119 64 

366,054 49 

8,135 16 

3,753 55 
9,726 31 



5,736 00 
750 50 

6,666 75 
925 92 

957 45 

515 35 

302,360 82 

2,625 99 

80,224 50 



6,749 50 
5,912 51 



5,424 34 
16,760 50 



1 No report. 



* Report not due. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 81 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



Interest, 
Di\adends, 

Annuities 
and Rentals 


Legacies 
specifically 

restricted 
to Capital 


Unrest rictec 
Legacies 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 

Number 

aided 


Total 

Number 

Free 


Number 

of 

Families 

aided 




$23,739 91 






$22,744 39 


$525 00 




22 




2 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1,919 45 


- 


- 


12 


- 


- 


2 
3 


24,378 68 


- 


- 


24,446 28 


3,100 00 


1 


379 


- 


- 


4 
5 
6 


15,533 15 


- 


- 


14,836 23 


- 


- 


38 


- 


- 


10,201 93 


- 


- 


6,581 24 


- 


" 


12 


12 


- 


7 


10,050 00 


^ 


_ 


10,383 89 


125 00 


1 


32 


32 


_ 


8 


388 78 


- 


$750 00 


9,472 02 


_3 


8 


61 


29 


- 


9 


1,800 70 


- 


- 


3,884 37 


1,300 00 


1 


12 2 


- 


4 


10 
11 




- 


- 


3,826 72 


2,053 00 


3 


375 


- 


- 


12 


45 50 


- 


_ 


51 00 


- 


- 


30 


- 


12 


13 


1,333 63 


- 


- 


6,702 55 


3,428 85 


7 


7,055 


- 


- 


14 


56 80 


_ 


_ 


1,679 69 


- 


- 


12 


- 


- 


15 


3,040 53 


§1,000 00 


- 


4,994 50 


600 00 


1 


1,302 


1,302 


- 


16 


- 


- 


- 


7,040 77 


4,346 92 


3 


3,000 


- 


- 


17 


1,498 15 


- 


5,000 00 


49,620 37 


25,379 04 


30 


1,921 


100 


- 


18 


97 34 


- 


- 


15,427 33 


11,105 37 


31 


326 


4 


- 


19 


670 19 


- 


- 


498 92 


260 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


20 


259 45 


- 


- 


39,934 40 


10,442 87 


13 


96 


- 


- 


21 

22 
23 


_ 


_ 


183 35 


5,624 11 


1,206 50 


2 


136 


2 


_ 


56 31 


- 


- 


266 20 


- 


- 


5 


5 


- 


24 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


25 


270 00 


- 


- 


1,099 82 


- 


- 


10 


- 


25 


26 
27 
28 
29 
30 


10 99 


- 


100 00 


2,226 46 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


816 58 


_ 


_ 


13,123 13 


3,154 00 


1 


857 


763 


_ 


19 56 


- 


- 


20,672 46 


18,120 77 


12 


37,604 


- 


- 


31 


225 00 


- 


- 


127 50 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


32 


12,561 78 


_ 


_ 


20,332 76 


7,973 85 


7 


24 


_ 


_ 


33 


1,195 23 


- 


- 


6,843 59 


3,709 95 


7 


854 


_ 


_ 


34 


- 


- 


- 


167 43 


2 40 


- 


1 


- 


- 


35 


133 06 


- 


- 


11,981 55 


6,190 39 


6 


2,700 


850 


250 


36 


2,671 82 


- 


- 


366,553 44 


- 


- 


162 


- 


_ 


37 


39 38 


- 


- 


8,162 86 


_ 


- 


60 


60 


_ 


38 


869 00 


- 


100 00 


969 00 


- 


- 






_ 


39 


- 


- 


- 


6,238 35 


3,021 09 


4 


13 


1 


- 


40 


11,750 66 


7,881 43 


- 


41,474 16 


-3 


19 


303 


63 


_ 


41 


7 80 


- 


- 


498 54 


_ 


- 


12 




_ 


42 


6.490 83 


- 


- 


22,963 55 


7,118 85 


10 


694 


22 


- 


43 
44 
45 


8,623 40 


_ 


_ 


19,653 41 


9,559 25 


14 


2,026 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


740 50 


94 50 


1 


52 


- 


100 


46 
47 
48 


12,699 61 


6,000 00 


_ 


19,366 36 


281 25 


1 


132 


132 


I 


9,695 52 


3,000 00 


- 


17,699 21 


6,384 83 


8 


43 


42 


- 


49 


1 90 


- 


- 


1,029 65 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


50 


625 08 


_ 


_ 


1,484 53 


_ 


_ 


24 


24 


13 


51 


12,493 52 


- 


21,941 49 


307,033 97 


20,797 01 


10 








52 


4,407 34 


- 


- 


977 92 


50 00 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


53 


5,057 13 


~ 


3,577 00 


91,820 12 


3,565 82 


- 


- 


- 


- 


54 


4 44 


- 


- 


10,386 04 


7,084 80 


12 


/ 52 

1 13,505 


} .u 


75 


55 


658 70 


- 


- 


7,540 87 


3,961 75 


4 






- 


56 


1,565 26 


7,650 44 


_ 


6,413 36 


_ 


_ 


152 


_ 


_ 


57 


~ 


- 


- 


967,299 29 


303,699 20 


350 


- 


- 


- 


58 


3 76 


- 


- 


50 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


10 


59 
60 



Organizations aided. 



Not separately reported. 



82 DEPARTMENT OE PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 


Incum- 


Subscrip- 


Earnings 






Property 


brances on 


tions. Dona- 


and 






reported 


Real Estate 


tions, etc. 


Refunds 




Boston — Con. 










1 


Women's Scholarship Association ' . . . 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


9 


Wood Memorial Home ' ..... 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Working Girls' Home (St. Helena's House) 


$264,250 00 


$40,000 00 


$634 15 


$77,672 61 


4 


Young Men's Eihicational Aid Association • 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


5 


Young Men's Hebrew Association of Boston 


51.800 00 


25,000 00 


17.166 75 


6,491 38 


6 


Young Travellers' Aid Society, The . 

BOXFORD. 


23,502 95 


" 


53 00 


" 


7 


Female Charitable Society of West Boxford 
Br.vintree. 






16 80 


222 61 


8 


Braintree Friendly Aid Association 


- 


- 


5,019 56 


642 86 


9 


Braintree Young Men's Christian Association 
Bridgewater. 


1,800 00 








10 


Bridgewater Visiting Nurse Association 


- 


- 


1,095 94 


985 84 


11 


Millet Sanatorium 

Brocktox. 


14,500 00 


3,700 00 




14,367 20 


12 


Brockton Day Nursery 


20,000 00 


- 


393 27 


3,171 00 


13 


Brockton Hospital Company .... 


532,117 87 


40.000 00 


48,616 63 


86,604 33 


14 


Brockton Humane Society, The .... 


5,000 00 


- 


4,013 25 


255 00 


15 


Brockton Rotary Charitable and Educational 












As.sociation ' 


- 


- 


- 


- 


16 


Brockton \'isiting Nurse Association » 


- 


- 


- 


- 


17 


Brockton Young Men's Christian Association 


489,500 00 


225 00 


30,014 72 


10,881 39 


18 


Brockton Young Women's Christian Association 


171,800 00 


6.000 00 


13,777 00 


24,475 56 


19 


Douglas Gift to the Brockton Day Nursery, 












Trustee of 


20,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


20 


Family Welfare Association of Brockton . 


- 


- 


8,904 65 


- 


21 


Sarah J. Pettee Memorial Scholarship Fund, 












Trustees of 


1.786 50 


- 


- 


- 


22 


Wales Home for Aged Women .... 


168,574 03 


- 


899 00 


451 75 


23 


Woman's Club of Brockton i . . . . 
Brookline. 










24 


American Ramabai Association .... 


5,600 00 


- 


2,645 87 


- 


25 


Brookline Day Nursery ..... 


9,067 00 


- 


102 00 


- 


26 


Brookline Friendly Society, The 


62,247 43 


4.500 00 


26,250 70 


4,658 38 


27 


Brooks Cubicle Hospital, Inc 


114.954 80 


- 


- 


- 


28 


Brooks Hospital 


225,940 50 


70.000 00 


6,000 00 


77,936 59 


29 


Chandler Service Homestead Incorporated 


- 


- 


6,377 76 


30,045 00 


30 


Eloist Ministry, The 


15,000 00 


9.500 00 


9,075 10 


11,467 13 


31 


Free Hospital for Women 


2,071,996 31 


- 


22,482 49 


372 00 


32 


Gulick-Farnsworth Fund, Inc 

Cambridge. 


2,710 00 








33 


Ames Foundation 


8.885 05 


- 


- 


9 04 


34 


Avon Home 


286,132 29 


- 


2,162 47 


14,515 04 


35 


Baptist Home, The 


128,212 31 


_ 


4,828 86 


3,823 56 


36 


Cambridge and Somerville Gemelath Chesed 












Charitable Loan Association .... 


- 


- 


- 


719 53 


37 


Cambridge Anti-Tuberculosis Association . 


3,108 62 


- 


2,607 42 


3,563 91 


38 


Cambridge Homes for Aged People . 


341,003 99 


- 


2,122 00 


5,358 70 


39 


Cambridge H(5spital 


759,551 84 


- 


5,226 42 


98,661 61 


40 


Cambridge Neighborhood House, Inc. 


9.740 69 


1.048 01 


4,017 05 


1,494 42 


41 


Cambridgeport Fruit and Flower Mission . 


- 


- 


61 20 


- 


42 


Cambridge Visiting Nursing Association 


25.150 00 


3,500 00 


4.115 87 


13,303 94 


43 


Cambridge Welfare Union 


24,149 67 


- 


14,824 22 


2,887 52 


44 


Cambridge Young Men's Christian Association i 


- 


- 


- 


- 


45 


Cambridge Young Women's Christian Association 


156,827 45 


- 


10,442 47 


40,480 83 


46 


Columbus Day Nxirsery of Cambridge' 


- 


- 


- 


- 


47 


East End Union of Cambridge, Massachusetts . 


19,900 00 


1.500 00 


5,475 78 


129 95 


48 


Harvard Legal Aid Bureau .... 


- 


- 


- 


- 


49 


Holy Ghost Hospital for Incurables . 


239,200 00 


- 


510 00 


63,962 73 


50 


Lamson Home, The 


15,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


61 


Massachusetts Branch of the Shut-in Society, Inc. 


3,141 02 


- 


1,025 44 


- 


52 


Middlesex Charitable Infirmaries, Inc. 


6,100 00 


3,100 00 


7,152 52 


13,487 20 


53 


Prospect Union Association ' . . . . 




- 


- 


- 


54 


Riverside House Association i . . . . 


- 


~ 


~ 


- 



No report. 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



83 



Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



Interest , 
Dividends, 

Annuities 
and Rentals 


Legacies 
specifically 
restricted 
to Capital 


Unrestricted 
Legacies 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 

Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 

Number 

aided 


Total 

Number 

Free 


Number 

of 

Families 

aided 




$107 21 


- 


$500 00 


$78,878 60 


$15,318 59 


38 


2,149 


583 


1 


2 
3 
4 
5 


17 24 


_ 


_ 


17,250 01 


5,314 52 


2 


_ 


_ 


_ 


835 64 


- 


- 


1.039 79 


1,039 79 


2 


- 


- 


- 


6 


' 


- 


- 


335 85 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


7 


35 23 


- 


: 


6,076 97 


4,821 00 


3 


548 


227 


- 


8 
9 


265 88 






2.318 51 


1,439 98 


1 


262 






10 


- 


- 


- 


16,839 88 


_3 


10 


78 


3 


- 


11 


15 12 


S5,000 00 


_ 


3,604 76 


1,369 80 


4 


4.151 


25 




12 


13.227 35 


60,163 48 


- 


142,166 09 


_3 


80 


2,168 




_ 


13 


347 58 


" 


" 


3,637 98 


480 00 


1 


~ 


~ 


- 


14 

15 
16 
17 


19,737 00 


I 


- 


71,710 78 


_ 
20,704 19 


23 


4,343 


2,800 


- 


1,491 33 


- 


- 


44,917 89 


21,007 51 


15 


- 




- 


18 


515 15 


_ 


_ 


515 15 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


19 


4 24 


- 


- 


8,958 16 


4,024 18 


2 


- 


- 


411 


20 


197 83 


30 00 


_ 


100 00 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


21 


7,647 62 


- 


1,500 00 


9,097 01 


4,096 48 


5 


19 


19 


- 


22 


- 


" 


" 


" 


~ 


~ 


_ 


- 


- 


23 


26 21 


_ 


_ 


1,651 40 


_ 


_ 


2,000 


2,000 




24 


260 63 


- 


- 


338 80 


- 


- 


_ 




_ 


25 


2.733 43 


1,076 85 


- 


32,313 98 


17,719 95 


16 


4,839 


3,621 


263 


26 


5,460 47 


- 


- 


476 87 


_3 


- 


_ 






27 


- 


- 


- 


84,554 70 


_3 


50 


806 


_ 


_ 


28 


244 82 


- 


- 


37,588 34 


4.128 59 


5 


_ 


_ 


_ 


29 


- 


- 


- 


15.419 78 


7,674 82 


6 


7,307 


2,525 


_ 


30 


63,418 29 


- 


7,052 44 


100,167 75 


-3 


100 


2,595 


1,081 


_ 


31 


4 83 


~ 


~ 


~ 


~ 


~ 


- 


- 


- 


32 


479 59 


_ 


_ 


5 00 


_ 


_ 


. 


_ 


. 


33 


11.026 77 


5.500 00 


- 


28,894 85 


7,471 52 


7 


12 

1 214 


1 " 


387 


34 


5,100 59 


5,530 00 


- 


13,688 46 


4.859 00 


10 


38 




- 


35 


1 64 


_ 


_ 


826 31 


30 00 


_ 


30 


_ 


_ 


36 


50 79 


3,108 62 


- 


5,375 69 


2,328 25 


3 




_ 


_ 


37 


11.689 44 


6,000 00 


6,119 55 


24.009 49 


6,547 26 


12 


57 


_ 


_ 


38 


14,996 98 


469 58 


5,266 65 


119,897 39 


_3 


117 


2.907 


744 


_ 


39 


758 00 


- 


- 


6,459 72 


4.239 83 


9 


1,654 


994 


_ 


40 


81 65 


- 


- 


205 26 


- 


- 


75 


75 


75 


41 


844 79 


- 


- 


19,030 06 


9,143 65 


14 


/ 1^ 
I 2.811 


J 436 


- 


42 


1,232 79 


- 


1.000 00 


17.047 83 


6,556 04 


5 




- 


837 


43 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


44 


1,550 00 


- 


- 


62.588 71 


31,088 38 


26 


120,366 


15,000 


_ 


45 


- 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


_ 


_ 


46 


481 38 


- 


1.000 00 


9.059 52 


3,115 55 


3 


- 


- 


_ 


47 


— 


— 


— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


48 


512 27 


- 


- 


69,654 46 


_3 


6G 


300 


45 


_ 


49 


398 50 


- 


_ 


329 60 


_ 








_ 


50 


141 33 


- 


- 


1.056 09 


330 00 


1 


400 


_ 


_ 


51 


- 


- 


- 


24,481 63 


_3 


22 


3,912 


1,737 


- 


52 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


53 




1 
















54 



Organizations aided. 



Not separately reported. 



84 



DEPARTIMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Total 
Property 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 



Subscrip- 
tions, Dona- 
tions, etc. 



Cambridge — Con. 
United Pentecostal Council of the Assemblies of 
God, Inc. ........ 

Wesley Foundation at Harvard University, The . 

C.\NTON. 

Canton Hospital and Nursing Association 
Canton Playground Association . 

Chelsea. 
Chelsea Day Nursery and Children's Home 
Chelsea Hebrew Charitable Loan Association * 
Chelsea Hebrew Slieltcring Home 
CheLsea Memorial Hospital ^ 

Chelsea Memorial Hospital Aid Association, Inc. 
Chelsea Young Men's Christian Association ^ 
Che^Ta Bikur Cholim of Chelsea 
Che\Ta Kadisha of Chelsea 1 
Hebrew Ladies Charitable Association i 
Old Ladies' Home Association of Chelsea . 
Soldiers' Home in Massachusetts, Trustees of 

Chicopee. 
Sherman Rest Home, Thei .... 



S15,590 14 


33,457 71 


'. 2,500 00 


2,000 00 


; 1,160 65 


'. 79,000 00 
720,865 72 



Clinton. 
Clinton Home for Aged People, The . 
Clinton Hospital Association .... 
Clinton-Lancaster Tuberculosis Association 

COHASSET. 

Beechwood Improvement Association, Inc. 

Bonnie Bairns Association 

Sandy Beach Association 

Concord. 
Concord Female Charitable Society 
Concord's Home for the Aged .... 
New England Deaconess Association . 
Women's Parish Association .... 

D ALTON. 

Berkshire Animal Rescue League 

Young Men'fc Christian Association of Dalton . 

D.\NVERS. 

Danvers Home for the Aged .... 

Danvers Visiting Nurse Association 

Putnam Home, Inc., The 

Robert A. MacFadden Educational Fund, Inc. . 

Dedham. 
Dedham Cottage Hospital . . . 
Dedham Emergency Nursing Association . 
Dedham Temporary Home for Women and 

Children 

Social Service Board of Dedham, Inc., The* 

DUXBURY. 

Duxbury Nurse Association, Inc., The 

E.A5THAMPTON. 

Helping Hand Society 



Easton. 
Eastondale Community Club 

Everett. 
ChevTO Kodisho of Everett, The i 
Everett Cottage Hospital i . 
Everett Home for Aged Persons . 
New England Home for Deaf Mutes 
Blind or Infirm) .... 



(Aged, 



83,455 06 
213,648 94 


2,500 00 


23,988 32 


64,778 74 

52,549 84 

1,825 19 


31,000 00 
83,216 25 


47,864 82 


36,100 00 
1,250 00 


432 38 
5,000 00 


58,075 55 



13,000 00 
1,088 00 



28,843 50 
27,350 00 



$1,550 00 



1,140 00 



425 00 



700 00 



$931 79 



1,310 



1.981 95 


122 52 


126 40 


1.015 33 


1,319 50 
208,191 00 



1,392 68 

6,024 75 

8 00 



673 08 
198 00 



5,262 00 
140 00 

1,614 33 
571 35 



3,750 00 



406 00 

3,251 49 

10 00 

346 35 



3,516 31 
2,333 40 

2,386 10 

3,666 70 

534 92 

506 10 
5,160 17 



No report. 



Report not due. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 

Charitahle Corporations — Continued. 



85 



Legacies 
specifically 

restricted 
to Capital 



Unrestricted 
Legacies 



Current 
Expenditures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Total 

Number 

aided 



Total 

Number 

Free 



Number 

of 

Families 

aided 



$50,000 00 



1,300 00 



$2,000 00 



4,818 55 



500 00 



50,000 00 
6,812 11 



200 00 
454 23 



S383 96 
5,000 00 



3,174 20 
730 18 



5,585 83 

484 25 

2,357 77 

1,087 79 



4,545 17 
226,867 95 



968 63 

3,472 80 

32,238 15 

468 27 



1,790 11 
16,716 57 



4,456 97 

3,179 75 

2,697 13 

346 00 



9 72 
8,274 45 

18,214 54 

2.485 99 

4.486 83 
407 12 

2,374 18 

8,974 87 



$2,500 00 



_3 

397 50 



2,603 25 



261 47 



1,213 87 
99,840 19 



5,555 01 2,173 

57,509 04 

643 82 

838 42 

1,157 15 



70 00 
602 00 



1,394 00 



900 00 
5,544 79 



1,120 00 

1,877 34 

975 81 



4,488 27 
7,631 00 

1,495 00 

1,894 62 

68 75 

753 60 

2,840 00 



264 



311 



500 



788 



12 
1,574 



689 



10 

443 

56 

2 



665 
432 



168 



311 



500 



10 
129 



90 



2 Organizations aided. 



3 Not separately reported. 



86 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 


Incum- 


Subscrip- 


Earnings 






Property 


brances on 


tions. Dona- 


and 






reported 


Real Estate 


tions, etc. 


Refunds 




Fairhaven. 










1 


Fairhaven Benevolent Association 


$12,540 00 


- 


$605 00 


$0 30 


2 


Ladies' Benevolent Society, The 
Fall River. 


1,200 00 


" 


312 64 




3 


Aninml Rescue League of Fall River . 


6, 900 00 


- 


1,386 00 


868 20 


4 


Associacao de Carridade do Ispirito Santo da 












Santissima Trinidade 


2,000 00 


- 


457 44 


205 25 


5 


.•Association for Community Welfare in Fall River 


3,875 00 


- 


6,308 06 


3,247 23 


6 


Bishop Stang Day Nursery i . . . . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


7 


Boys' Club of Fall River 


436,593 06 


- 


8.465 60 


7.949 62 


8 


Children's Home of Fall River .... 


217,749 95 


- 


1,018 10 


5,259 46 


9 


District Nursing Association of Fall River . 


3,500 00 


- 


31,464 65 


35,776 32 


10 


Door of Hope in Fall River, Inc. ' . . . 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


11 


East End Hebrew Gemilath Chassodim Associa- 












tion of Fall River 


_ 


- 


6 00 


1,026 50 


12 


Fall River Anti-Tuberculosis Society . 


- 


- 


630 00 


2,368 12 


13 


Fall River Deaconess Home .... 


82,000 00 


- 


6,033 42 


2,944 84 


14 


Fall River Hebrew Women's Charitable Insti- 












tution 


6,000 00 


$3,500 00 


- 


300 00 


15 


Fall River High School Alumni Scholarships, 












Trustees of 


38,585 00 


_ 


- 




16 


Fall River Women's Union 


115,151 50 


- 


4,693 50 


1,006 15 


17 


Franciscan Missionaries of Mary of Fall River . 


10,000 00 


4,000 00 


2,273 13 


2,116 00 


18 


Hebrew Free Loan Association of Fall River i . 




- 


_ 


_ 


19 


Hebrew Free School Society i . . . . 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


20 


Hebrew Ladies' Aid Association .... 


300 00 


_ 


417 00 


329 85 


21 


Hebrew Ladies' Helping Hand Society of Fall 

Riveri 

Home for Aged People in Fall River . 










22 


344,464 36 


- 


572 49 


415 26 


23 


Mt. Lebanon Society 1 


- 


_ 


— 


— 


24 


Portuguese Blessed Sacrament Association, The, 
Under the Name of Vetera Romana Catholica 












Ecclesiai 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


25 


Rescue Mission of Fall River, Mass.' . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


26 


St. Anne's Hospital Corporation 


115,000 00 


- 


323 37 


56,345 83 


27 


St. Joseph's Orphanage 




10,000 00 


17,108 10 


46,642 34 


28 


St. Vincent's Home Corporation of Fall River . 


163,550 00 


- 


28,747 32 


6,124 36 


29 


Truesdale Hospital, Inc., The .... 


125,276 59 


36,000 00 


3,300 00 


59,645 37 


30 


Union Hospital in Fall River, The 1 . 
Woman's Christian Temperance Union of Fall 

River' 

Young Men's Christian Association of Fall River' 


- 


- 


- 


- 


31 










32 


- 


- 


- 


- 




FiTCHBURG. 










33 


Burbank Hospital 


- 


- 


250 00 


114,952 67 


34 


Family Welfare Association of Fitchburg . 


4,100 00 


- 


6,803 75 


1,566 92 


35 


Fitchburg Helping Hand Association 


200 00 


- 


224 72 


22,326 82 


36 


Fitchburg Home for Old Ladies .... 


125,643 34 


- 


420 00 


2,728 17 


37 


Fitchburg Union Aid Home for Children . 


32,124 00 


- 


902 55 


403 00 


38 


New England French American Home 


10,142 00 


6,000 00 


2,414 50 


725 00 


39 


Visiting Nursing Association of Fitchburg, The' 






- 


- 


40 


Young Men's Christian Association of Fitchburg 

FOXBOROUGH. 


174,303 02 


80,000 00 


25,357 41 


6,393 24 


41 


Doolittle Universalist Home for Aged Persons, 












Inc 


56,695 50 


- 


3,961 58 


3,020 62 




Framingham. 










42 


Chautauqua Association Inc 


12,500 00 


- 


- 


12 00 


43 


Christian Workers Union 


10,000 00 


5,000 00 


9,272 51 


- 


44 


Framingham Civic League, Inc. ' . . . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


45 


Framingham Hospital 


172,733 94 


- 


8,594 83 


66,073 61 


46 


Hebrew Ladies' Aid Society of Framingham ' . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


47 


Home for Aged Men and Women in Framingham 
Franklin-. 


74,984 19 


" 


2,201 29 


7,084 96 


48 


Franklin Playground and Garden Association ' . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


49 


Young Men's Christian Association of Franklin' 
Gardner. 










50 


Gardner Home for Elderly People 


84,164 67 


- 


- 


500 00 


51 


Henry Hey wood Memorial Hospital, The' 


~ 


~ 


" 


" 



No report. 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



87 



Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



Interest, 
Dividends, 

Annuities 
and Rentals 


Legacies 
specifically 
restricted 
to Capital 


Unrestricted 
Legacies 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 

Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 

Number 

aided 


Total 

Number 

Free 


Number 

of 

Families 

aided 




$616 62 
2 20 




_ 


$945 75 
328 02 


$100 00 


1 


62 


62 


32 


1 
2 


690 00 


- 


- 


4,271 29 


957 00 


1 


3,561 


1,031 


- 


3 


163 49 

9,007 32 

10,003 47 

555 29 


: 

$51,000 00 
7,065 18 


- 


396 50 
9,710 91 

25,754 38 
13,880 28 
54,821 03 


3,841 69 

10,078 40 

6,344 80 

48,070 23 


2 

7 
11 
31 


12 

3,100 

77 
8,537 


12 
16 


12 
103 

- 


4 
5 

6 
7 
8 
9 
10 


42 20 
6,418 11 


- 


- 


20 00 
3,399 45 
16,392 87 


20 00 
4,156 11 


12 


32 

1,250 


120 


100 


11 
12 
13 


441 00 


- 


- 


15 00 


- 


- 


100 


100 


180 


14 


1,833 98 
2,935 03 


750 00 


~ 


1,825 66 
9,235 78 
4,784 01 


3,788 88 


16 


10 
750 
450 


10 

450 


80 


15 
16 
17 
18 


- 


= 


- 


646 85 


- 


- 


200 


200 


10 


19 
20 


17,224 22 


- 


$5,500 00 

- 


17,468 24 


7,150 68 


9 


26 


- 


- 


21 

22 
23 


1,626 39 
718 98 
220 00 


- 


- 

2,514 79 
1,150 00 


54,773 09 
54,831 16 
37,171 19 
62,742 36 


-3 

8,536 80 
5,670 00 

-3 


29 
46 
21 
73 


1,592 
682 
210 
987 


435 
166 
136 
124 


- 
_ 


24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 

31 
32 

33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 


10,975 04 
250 27 

5,027 54 

1,706 33 

4 25 

5,566 14 


522 43 
1,000 00 


1,200 00 
200 00 


126,305 87 

11,271 76 

22,008 73 

7,069 46 

4,033 55 

3,191 47 

39,164 04 


_3 

3,705 00 
5,516 92 
2,786 00 
1,564 80 
743 00 

14,460 00 


76 
2 

10 
5 
4 
3 

5 


2,631 

1,174 

783 

17 

27 

56 


2 
17 

45 


- 
2 


596 92 


21,232 45 


17,615 45 


5,157 28 


967 71 


4 


10 




- 


41 


580 00 

4,938 75 
2,742 10 


3,000 00 


1,179 22 


427 90 
10,585 93 

79,120 66 

9,138 78 


175 07 
7,046 00 

_3 

2,836 45 


10 
79 
5 


40 
2,615 

24 


48 


- 


42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 

48 


4,489 77 


- 


_ 


3,906 43 


1,205 50 


2 


6 


5 


_ 


49 

50 
51 



Organizations aided. 



9 Not separately reported. 



88 DEP.\11TMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 


Incum- 


Subscrip- 


Earnings 






Property 


brances on 


tions, Dona- 


and 






reported 


Real Estate 


tions, etc. 


Refunds 




Georgetown. 










1 


Carleton Home, Trustees of The 

GLOrCESTER. 


$44,385 47 








2 


Addifeon Gill>ort Hospital ... 


375,894 81 


- 


SlOO 00 


i26,098 10 


3 


Aniusciuam Association, Inc 


5,400 00 


- 


5,000 00 


- 


4 


Associated Charities of Gloucester 


5,000 00 


- 


30 68 


- 


5 


Gilbert Home for Aged and Indigent Persons . 


101,564 73 


- 


- 


1,627 07 


6 


Gloucester District Nursing Association 


- 


- 


5,276 92 


2,449 43 


7 


Gloucester Female Charitable Association . 


67,433 14 


_ 


12 00 


_ 


8 


Gloucester Fisherman's Institute 


76,978 54 


- 


3,040 19 


5,384 46 


9 


Gloucester Fishermen's and Seamen's Widows' 












and Orphans' Aid Society .... 


71,733 33 


- 


97 50 


- 


10 


Gloucester Hebrew Ladies' Aid Association, Inc. 


_ 


- 


472 96 


- 


11 


Huntress Home ...... 


40,200 00 


- 


5 00 


5.213 68 


12 


William Lawrence Camp, Inc 


2,500 00 


SI, 100 00 


_ 


- 


13 


Women's Clubhouse Association of Magnolia ^ . 






- 


- 


14 


Young Men's Christian Association of Gloucester 
Great Barrixgton. 


59,000 00 


~ 


18,798 80 


9.916 29 


15 


Fairvievv Hospital 


166,600 00 


- 


2,056 96 


10,814 90 


16 


Visiting Nurse Association of Great Harrington, 












The 


20.700 00 


- 


3,382 84 


5,274 26 




Greexfield. 










17 


Franklin County Public Hospital 


150,354 41 


2,437 50 


10,400 75 


41,976 17 


18 


Franklin County Young Men's Christian Asso- 












ciation 


_ 


_ 


2,425 31 


150 00 


19 


Girls' Club of Greenfield, Massachusetts . 


_ 


_ 


1,752 59 


174 75 


20 


Greenfield Society for the Protection of Animals 
Greenwich. 


" 


" 


204 10 




21 


Hillside School 

Hanson. 


51,200 00 


" 


8,370 16 


9,298 69 


22 


Massachusetts Branch of the International Order 
of the King's Daughters and Sons (Gordon 












Rest) 


9,700 00 


- 


1,039 32 


2,755 80 




H.A.VERHILL. 










23 


Esodia Theotokou Scalohoriton Lesvou, Inc. . 


1,275 25 


_ 


492 17 


- 


24 


Family Welfare Society of Haverhill i 


- 


- 


- 


- 


25 


General Gale Hospital Aid Association 


- 


- 


326 45 


- 


26 


Hale Hospital 


336,340 07 


_ 


762 62 


70,134 19 


27 


Haverhill Boys' Club Association 


84,403 91 


1,200 00 


3,160 50 


850 49 


28 


Haverhill Children's Aid Society 


98,183 90 




4,371 62 


2,193 68 


29 


Haverhill College Club, (Incorporated) 




- 


8 32 


401 50 


30 


Haverhill Day Nursery Association 


24,050 65 


_ 


2,213 31 


3,344 95 


31 


Haverhill Female Benevolent Society 


111,501 75 


- 


168 50 


- 


32 


Haverhill Master House Painters and Decorators 












-Association 


_ 


_ 


213 50 


120 00 


33 


Haverhill Union Mission, Inc 


13,520 00 


6,500 00 


262 71 


- 


34 


Haverhill Young Men's Christian Association . 


75,000 00 


1,000 00 


9,394 53 


11,387 02 


35 


Haverhill Young Women's Christian Association 


31,794 03 




1,354 20 


13,377 96 


36 


Linwood 0. Towne Scholarship Association, Inc., 












The 


957 95 


_ 


687 00 


516 87 


37 


Mary F. Ames Convalescent Home, Inc., The.i . 




- 


- 


- 


38 


Old Ladies' Home Association .... 


171,928 19 


- 


1,206 26 


1,627 52 


39 


Progressive Society of Kalloniaton, Arisbe, The . 


- 


- 


671 50 


- 


40 


Social Circle of Portland Street Church 

HOLDEN. 


" 


" 




715 39 


41 


Holden Hospital, Incorporated .... 


- 


- 


3,923 92 


7,362 71 


42 


Holden \isiting Nurse Association, Inc. i . 

HOLYOKE. 










43 


Holyoke Bojs Club .Association 1. 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


44 


Holyoke City Hospital 


273,323 68 


- 


76,537 14 


92,065 25 


45 


Holyoke Day Nursery, Inc. .... 


_ 


- 


8,935 84 


5,433 51 


46 


Holyoke District Nurse Association, Inc. . 


- 


- 


3,939 91 


6,202 22 


47 


Holyoke Home for Aged People .... 


157,187 94 


- 


3,020 37 


9,420 36 



No report. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 89 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



Interest, 

Dividends. 

Annuities 

and Rentals 


Legacies 
specifically 
restricted 
to Capital 


Unrestricted 
Legacies 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 

Number 

aided 


Total 

Number 

Free 


Number 

of 

Families 

aided 




S2,050 41 


- 


- 


S2,474 95 


S712 98 


1 


5 


5 


- 


1 


17,280 94 
699 42 

1.124 02 
4,641 14 

261 07 

2.970 00 

3.125 59 


S6,500 00 
3,750 00 


~ 


40,440 65 

550 25 

1,601 22 

5,233 59 

5,630 13 

3.244 91 
8.940 45 


_3 

501 84 
1,972 05 

3,993 47 

250 00 
4,437 13 


38 

1 
3 

4 
3 


946 

9 

I 89 


24 

5 

} 89 


500 

381 
66 


2 
3 
4 
5 

6 

7 
8 


3,278 76 

17 00 

1,627 01 

260 00 


- 


- 


3,513 83 
544 88 

6,848 19 
313 85 


229 13 
2,241 09 


1 
3 


142 

6 

350 


6 

7 


97 


9 
10 
11 
12 
13 


7,395 40 


- 


- 


37,166 81 


11,886 71 


11 


/ 252 
I 9,000 


} 4,500 


- 


14 


5,328 37 


- 


$3,000 00 


17,813 60 


_3 


11 


476 


10 


- 


15 


675 18 


10,700 00 


500 00 


10,715 88 


5,702 96 


6 


493 


191 


- 


16 


3.710 41 


- 


150 00 


58,658 71 


_3 


35 


1,005 


12 


- 


17 


11 00 
141 09 
51 63 


~ 


- 


2,586 57 

1,813 73 

277 50 


1,320 10 

1,281 61 

277 50 


1 
9 
2 


193 


~ 


~ 


18 
19 
20 


1,289 02 




- 


20,079 27 


7,540 66 


8 


{ ,r 


} ' 


- 


21 


35 41 




- 


3,895 38 


1,034 10 


7 


200 


- 


- 


22 


13 00 


- 


- 


20 76 


- 


- 


- 




- 


23 
24 


32 14 

3,794 P3 
1,536 85 
5,436 04 
13 67 
447 57 
4,677 08 


20,000 00 


2,000 00 
5,000 00 


443 05 

102,451 73 

6,341 31 

10,599 24 

600 00 

4,678 23 

4,337 57 


24 00 

-3 

3,993 30 
1,926 91 

2,900 95 
600 00 


62 

9 

3 
4 


f 12 

I 18 

1,297 

1,200 

34 

447 
18 


20 

13 

18 


3 

24 
109 


25 

26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 


180 00 
2,844 24 

883 79 


- 


100 00 


478 78 

4,758 13 

20,543 93 

16,438 61 


855 42 
11,122 43 
6,470 13 


2 
7 
9 


559 
1.106 
1,773 


547 
455 


80 


32 
33 
34 
35 


6,812 35 
33 89 


- 


1,000 00 


1,225 62 

12,736 89 

40 23 

1,156 32 


4,571 02 


7 


2 

28 


28 


- 


36 
37 

38 
39 
40 


- 


9.138 41 


- 


12.184 88 


-3 


8 


321 


314 


- 


41 
42 


5,196 82 

37 09 
4.870 55 


13,428 65 
3.902 75 


109,416 95 


169.530 84 
13,548 81 
9,481 69 
10,316 62 


_3 

1.515 49 

7,492 15 
4,457 15 


82 
12 

7 

7 


2,302 

2,205 
23 


38 

565 
22 


- 


43 
44 
45 
46 
47 



- Organizations aided. 



3 Not separately reported. 



9() DEPARTMENT OF PUBLir WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 


Incum- 


Subscrip- 


Earnings 






Property 


brances on 


tions. Dona- 


and 






reported 


Real Estate 


tions, etc. 


Refunds 




HOLYOKE — Con. 










1 


Holyoke Young Men's Christian Association 


$429,696 00 


$50,000 00 


$10,120 99 


$16,366 84 





Sisters of Providence (Beaven-Kelly Home) 


70.000 00 


30.000 00 


600 41 


14,503 03 


3 


Sisters of Providence (Brightside Orphans' and 












Bethlehem Homes) 


141,000 00 


10,000 00 


18,599 30 


37,159 83 


4 


Sisters of Providence (House of Providence Hos- 
pital and Father Harkins' Home for Aged 
VVomen) 












150,000 00 


- 


779 30 


106,446 82 


5 


Sisters of Providence (Mt. St. Vincent Home for 












Girls) 


65,000 00 


- 


3.852 37 


21.747 73 


6 


Skinner Coffee House. Incorporated 


30.650 00 


_ 


7.000 00 


11.624 35 


7 


White Cross Association for Graduate Nurses 












of Holyoke, Mass 


1.811 07 


_ 


24 00 


26 00 


8 


Young Women's Christian .\ssociation of Holyoke 

HOPEDALE. 


104,700 00 




9,651 60 


24,210 04 


9 


Hopedale Community House, Inc. 1 . 
Ipswich. 










10 


Coburn Charitable Society 


195.659 34 


- 


- 


763 74 


11 


Ipswich Hospital (Operating Benjamin Stickney 












Cable Memorial Hospital) .... 


177,827 55 


- 


14,976 75 


9.992 81 




L.\XCASTER. 










12 


Charitable Fund in the Town of Lancaster, 












Trustees of 


12,376 70 


_ 


_ 


- 


13 


Nathaniel Thayer Playground Association . 
Lawrence. 






345 95 


2,275 00 


14 


Asrath Noshim 


- 


- 


740 00 


- 


15 


Columbian Charitable Guild of Lawrence. The 


- 


- 


355 50 


305 26 


16 


German Old Folks Home of Lawxence, Massa- 












chusetts 


10.000 00 


- 


1,046 87 


2,500 00 


17 


Hebrew Ladies' Progressive Association of 












Lawrence' 


— 


— 


- 


— 


18 


Incorporated Protectory of Mary Immaculate 


130.800 00 


- 


5,047 98 


30,300 30 


19 


Ladies' Hebrew Council! 


— 


— 


— 


— 


20 


Lawrence Boys' Club 


49.400 00 


- 


4,033 00 


2,478 57 


21 


Lawrence City Mission 


• 14.000 00 


3,500 00 


13,479 18 


5,040 29 


22 


Lawrence General Hospital .... 


519.021 84 




2,752 00 


80,770 62 


23 


Lawrence Home for Aged People 


370.526 35 


- 


2.606 51 


11,950 35 


24 


Lawrence Young Men's Christian Association 


212.300 37 


- 


15.582 05 


29,671 60 


25 


Lawrence Young Women's Christian Association 


69,033 25 


6,000 00 


7,629 75 


20,215 94 


26 i Russell-Hood Trust. Incorporated 


23.000 00 


- 


- 


- 


27 : SyTian National Club 1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


28 


United Hebrew Ladies' Free Loan -Association ^ . 


- 


~ 


~ 


~ 


29 


Lee. 
Ascension Farm School, Corporation of the 

Leicester. 


500 00 


3,000 00 


8.538 51 


2,950 73 


30 


Leicester Samaritan Association .... 
Legmin'-ster. 


5,146 45 




274 50 


1,730 10 


31 


Leominster Home for Old Ladies 


110,781 S3 


- 


- 


- 


32 


Leominster Hospital Association 
Lexington. 


45,671 10 


3,000 00 


400 00 


9,808 98 


33 


Lexington Home for Aged People 


30.022 63 


- 


3,624 11 


935 00 


34 


Lexington War Chest ' 

Lincoln. 










35 


Farrington Memorial Incorporated, The 

LONGMEADOW. 


279,715 81 


" 




3,531 41 


36 : Doane Orphanage, The 


54,590 05 


~ 


7.598 70 


3,452 34 



No report. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



91 



Legacies 
specifically 
restricted 
to Capital 



$12,376 70 



1,964 90 



5,050 00 



Unrestricted 
Legacies 



Current 
Expenditures 



$752 75 



3,443 58 



13,748 97 



19.657 19 



2,014 89 



1,090 00 



$45,992 90 
16,314 58 

56,428 47 

97,492 20 

33,246 82 
19,851 74 

35,343 82 



9,548 24 


51,474 32 


520 50 
2,662 81 


748 00 


495 31 



4,168 56 

43,952 01 

7,866 31 

28,620 09 

123,980 00 

13,625 14 

59,321 21 

45,134 03 

1,035 00 



12,002 71 
1,421 82 



4,118 61 
12,712 39 



5,246 97 

9,101 16 
17,681 05 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



$7,812 58 


12 


1,534 00 


3 


4,406 64 


15 


- 


108 


2,333 49 
9,382 93 


5 
11 


12,832 41 
- 


15 


4,096 10 


6 


_3 


14 


1,275 84 


5 


1,040 00 


2 


6,868 61 


34 


4,176 00 
9,257 00 

-3 

3,629 26 
29,595 80 


4 
5 
118 
7 
14 


7,715 76 


35 


3,070 00 


3 


1,200 00 


1 


1,652 55 

-3 


2 
13 


2,275 53 


2 


349 92 


3 


6,698 00 


6 



Total 

Number 

aided 


Total 

Number 

Free 


Number 

of 

Families 

aided 


f 112 

I 16,901 
88 


1 14,859 
1 


- 


563 


4 


- 


3,795 


164 


- 


240 


2 


- 


{ 317 


1 317 


: 


456 


70 


- 


15 

328 


15 

100 


- 


/ 152 

125 

12 

\ 5 


1 125 


125 
30 


14 


- 


- 


334 


61 


- 


900 

3,557 

30 

4,130 

/ 52 

1 44,379 


230 

1,714 
} 7.982 


22 


191 


95 


: 


8 
538 


8 
17 


- 


9 


8 


- 


46 


2 


_ 



2 Organizations aided. 



3 Not separately reported. 



92 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC ^VELFARE. [P. D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Total 
Property 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 



Subscrip- 
tions, Dona- 
tions, etc. 



Lowell 
Ayer Home, Trustees of 
Battles Home. The 
Chantiiiig Fraternity 
Children's Home . 

Faith Home . 



Florence Crittenton Rescue League of Lowell 

Ladies' Gmeloos Chasodem Association, The 

Lailies Helping Hand Society, The i . 

Lowell Hoys' Club Association 

Lowell Community Service (Incorporated) 

Lowell Corporation Hospital 

Lowell Day Nursery Association 

Lowell Dispensary 

Lowell General Hospital .... 

Lowell Good Will Industries, Inc. 

Lowell Guild of Lowell .... 

Lowell Humane Society, The 

Lowell Particular Council of the Society of St 

Vincent de Paul ..... 

Lowell Social Ser^•ice League 
Lowell Young Men's Christian Association 
Ministry-at-Large in Lowell, Mass. 

Old Ladies' Home 

L'Orphelinat Franco-Americain . 

Pan Thessalian Mutual Aid Society, Regas 

Pherraeos ' ...... 

Roman Catholic Archbishop of Boston (St 

Peter's Orphan Asylum) .... 

St. John's Hospital 

St. Patrick's Home of Lowell 

Young Women's Christian Association of Lowell 

Ludlow. 
Ludlow Hospital Society 



Lyxx. 
Aid Society of Lynn Day Nursery 
Associated Charities of Lynn 



30 
31 

32 Boys' Club of Lynn 

33 ' Charitable Travelers' Sheltering Association, Inc 

34 ! Columbus Guild of Lvnn .... 
35 
36 
37 
38 

39 

40 
41 
42 
43 
44 

45 



Eliza J. Hahn Home for Aged Couples 
Jewish Associated Charities of Lynn . 
Lynn Home for Aged Men .... 
Lynn Home for Aged Women 

Lynn Home for Children .... 

Lynn Home for Young Women i 

Lynn Hospital 

Lynn Jewish Orphans Relief Association ' . 

Lynn Tuberculosis League . 

Massachusetts Christian Endeavor Association 

Neighborhood House Association 



Pullman Mission 

Union Hospital 

Women's Union for Christian Work 

Young Men's Christian Association of Lj-nn 



M.\lden. 
Associated Charities of Maiden . 
Girls' Club Association of Maiden, Inc. 

Maiden Anti-Tuberculosis Society, Inc. 

Maiden Hebrew Free Loan Association i 
Maiden Hebrew Ladies' Charitable Society 



$339,621 22 
49.452 45 

7,772 49 
11,025 00 

7,000 00 



1,650 00 

31,194 43 

89,100 00 

99,127 39 

3.976 31 

695,224 12 

500 00 
30,796 80 



345,000 00 

86,391 78 

215,483 45 

145,000 00 



92,000 00 

612,346 00 

55,000 00 

80,105 75 



10,318 49 

11,802 00 
41,776 43 
4,075 00 
19,966 61 
73,426 68 

133,795 96 
217,079 07 

48,072 30 



654,788 31 



18,000 00 

23,478 56 

42,350 00 
6,750 00 

427,059 21 



4,500 00 
10,000 00 



400 00 



$4,000 00 



1,400 00 



10,000 00 
8,000 00 



1,000 00 



2,100 00 
4,500 00 



4,000 00 

5,000 00 
95,000 00 



$2,697 55 

2,891 26 

58 00 

585 68 

812 69 

1,336 50 
364 00 

6,166 25 

449 65 

36,000 00 

15 00 

7,013 00 

314 00 

7,420 20 
2,505 11 

1,053 87 
4,101 02 
11,977 00 
204 71 
1,670 87 
9,806 55 



8,914 45 
6,214 90 



13,708 56 



534 



6,556 90 

8,003 60 

46 15 

664 00 

1,390 28 

3,375 14 

10 00 

1,065 08 

319 00 
1,186 26 



4,888 85 
776 00 

50 00 
29,441 96 



1,465 50 
1,191 43 



07 



553 45 



No report. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



93 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 


Legacies 
specifically 
restricted 
to Capital 


Unrestricted 
Legacies 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 

Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 

Number 

aided 


Total 

Number 

Free 


Number 

of 

Families 

aided 




S14,047 23 

1,714 74 

264 42 

37 13 


$4,500 00 

- 
_ 


- 


$17,735 20 

3,668 82 

57 00 

2,577 20 


$4,854 35 
804 00 

884 95 


15 

2 

5 


177 
13 

22 

110 


177 
75 


- 


1 
2 
3 
4 


20 20 


500 00 


- 


1,763 84 


187 20 


1 


/ 22 

I 8 


} ^ 


2 


5 


22 50 


- 


- 


1,575 19 


1,183 34 


1 


/ 133 2 
I 499 


1 489 


- 


6 


16 97 


- 


- 


440 00 


62 00 


- 


19 


19 


- 


7 
8 
9 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 


1,125 17 

3,649 77 

213 71 

29,349 64 


500 00 


- 


4,693 77 

1,062 42 

74,060 91 

5,672 17 

160 10 

108,397 54 


3,298 00 
366 00 

_3 

1,801 91 


2 

162 
5 

70 


1,500 

7,499 
191 

22 

2,171 


1,500 

9 
35 


§3 


- 


- 


- 


18,422 42 


12,948 89 


18 


[ 62 
1 240 
2,720 


} '' 


226 


15 


1,971 61 
1,450 68 


- 


SI, 792 15 


19,573 25 
4,546 26 


13,093 73 
2,808 29 


9 
4 


1,637 


- 


16 
17 


3 73 

20,511 52 

3,391 07 

6,441 46 

962 70 


1,300 00 
500 00 


1,300 00 
3,972 74 


114 50 

3,003 15 

62,341 81 

3,833 84 

10,214 41 

33,739 46 


2,235 70 

23,444 29 

900 00 

3,311 01 

7,463 25 


2 

20 

1 

8 

32 


1,204 
43 

287 


1,204 
28 


208 
312 


18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 

24 

25 
56 
27 
28 


2,279 21 
8,343 02 




4,232 06 


15,761 50 

211,540 13 

15,257 58 

58,552 30 


1,752 00 

-3 

2,441 00 
16,637 07 


1 
67 

23 


202 

4,023 

276 


59 
72 
70 


- 


- 


- 


- 


14,439 73 


-3 


10 


468 


- 


- 


29 


356 47 


_ 


500 00 


13,919 03 


3,982 39 


5 


[ 32 

1 1,331 

300 

315 

8 

43 

7 

25 


} 1,271 

300 
300 

8 

25 


71 


30 


1,724 28 

2,249 30 

120 00 

320 62 

4,382 18 

6,386 54 
10,876 76 


- 


75 00 

1,945 35 
11,898 21 


12,025 30 
4,455 05 
801 36 
6,637 60 
4,079 85 
4.214 58 
5.250 49 

10,140 91 


3,753 37 

3,409 93 

129 45 

2,090 13 

1,916 05 

372 16 

811 74 

4,010 62 


4 
20 

4 
2 
1 
2 
4 


833 
70 


31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 


2,492 00 


- 


- 


6,480 92 


1,491 17 


4 


/ 32 
1 31 


} [ 


71 


39 


19,295 55 


28,583 60 


2,171 40 


147,516 19 


-3 


116 


7,208 


415 


- 


40 
41 
42 
43 
44 


20 23 
31 70 


_ 


_ 


1,349 59 
10 00 


1,250 00 


1 


- 


_ 


- 


423 96 


3,000 00 


~ 


7,877 51 


4,326 72 


22 


/ 1^ 
1 1.333 


} 398 


40 


45 


1,510 23 


- 


200 00 


2,030 68 


- 


- 


/ 112 

1 14 


\ 


2 


46 


528 35 


- 


_ 


54,535 64 
540 44 


_3 

120 00 


51 


1,602 


73 


- 


47 

48 


14,328 84 


- 


- 


115,658 81 


51,241 29 


40 


I 16,000 


1 16,000 


500 


49 


233 75 
141 20 


- 


100 00 


2,280 89 
5,256 50 


2,060 00 
1,443 38 


2 


188 


152 


461 


50 
51 


63 48 


- 


- 


959 80 


- 


- 


{ ..r 


} : 


- 


52 


- 


- 


- 


1,514 35 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


53 
54 



Organizations aided. 



Not separately reported. 



94 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Total 
Property 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 



Subscrip- 
tions, Dona- 
tions, etc. 



Malden — Con. 
Maiden High School Scholarship 
Maiden Home for Aged Persons . 
Maiden Hospital ' ..... 

.Maiden Industrial Aid Society 
Maiden War Chest Association • . 
Maiden Young Men's Christian Association 
Midvedifka Association ' . . . . 
Monday Club of Maiden .... 
Young Men's Hebrew Association of Maiden 
Young Women's Hebrew Association of Maiden 

M.\NSFIELD. 

Mansfield Visiting Nurse Association . 

M.^RBLEHEAD. 

Marblehead Female Humane Society . 
Marblehead Visiting Nurse Association 
Young Men's Christian Association of Marblehead 

Marlborough. 
Marlborough Hospital ..... 

Marlborough Woman's Club' .... 

Unitarian Ladies' Charitable Society . 

Medford. 
LawTcnce Memorial Hospital of Medford . 
Medford Home for Aged Men and Women 
Medford Scholarship of Harvard University, 

Trustees of ' . 
Medford Visiting Nurse Association . 
Sarah Fuller Home for Little Deaf Children 

Medway. 
Med way Ladies Aid Association, Inc. . 

Melrose. 

Fitch Home, Inc., The 

Melrose High School Scholarship, Inc. 

Melrose Hospital Association .... 

Methuen. 

Arlington Day Nursery and Children's Tempo- 
rary Home ....... 

Henry C. Nevins Home for the Aged and In- 
curable 

Middleborough. 
Montgomery Home for Aged People . 
St. Luke's Hospital of Middleborough 

MiLFORD. 

Home for the Aged at Milford .... 

Milford Hospital 

Young Men's Christian Association of Milford 

MiLLBURY. 

Millbury Society for District Nursing 



Milton. 
Kidder House Association ' . 
Milton Convalescent Home 
Milton Social Service League 

Swift Charity 



MONSO.V. 

Monson Home for Aged People, Inc. . 

Montague. 
Farren Memorial Hospital of Montague City, 
Mass., The ....... 



$9,544 37 
144,173 22 

79,844 93 

140,276 53 

100 00 
6,000 00 
2,500 00 



14.754 66 
10,957 95 
32,705 00 



85,066 36 



,634 13 



5,950 00 
39,887 30 



433,849 04 



161,072 97 
193,841 71 

8,000 00 
862,185 96 



30,633 99 
56,527 50 



8,337 72 

308,637 61 

14,560 67 



46,694 69 
37,473 40 

47,842 95 
94,000 00 



$3,000 00 



5,200 00 
4,000 00 



1,150 00 
10,000 00 



1,800 00 





$8,180 89 


2,618 79 


4.924 00 


438 75 
770 00 
112 00 


955 41 


707 56 

724 50 

7,169 07 


529 25 


131 50 


2,846 66 


2.352 00 


100 00 


6,297 47 


1,770 70 


8 50 
773 25 


1,628 00 
1,101 00 


806 75 


4,863 12 
5,285 31 


3,380 77 


24 00 



No report. 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



95 



Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 


Legacies 
specifically 
restricted 
to Capital 


Unrestricted 
Legacies 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 

Number 

aided 


Total 

Number 

Free 


Number 

of 

Families 

aided 




$486 93 
6,689 64 

2,347 88 

766 92 




$700 00 


$450 00 
11,517 48 

7,204 47 

34,636 34 


$3,573 62 
4,175 00 
13,892 79 


7 
4 

7 


3 
1,921 

3,679 

1,317 


3 
25 

1,423 


90 


1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 


19 74 


\ 


- 


1,086 81 
768 55 
112 87 


709 10 


5 


150 


- 


~ 


7 
8 
9 
10 


- 


- 


- 


2,046 78 


1,474 10 


1 


1,832 


592 


- 


11 


628 79 

480 00 

40 00 


- 


600 00 


1,001 75 
1.910 53 
8,569 41 


1,761 09 
3,914 00 


2 


18 
156 


23 


- 


12 
13 
14 


1,874 97 


- 


- 


33,535 71 


_3 


19 


936 


17 


- 


15 
16 


235 61 




1,000 00 


1,358 32 


53 80 


- 


/ 142 

1 50 


} - 


4 


17 


639 58 




- 


5,220 83 


1,902 90 


4 


12 


- 


- 


18 
19 


«,324 04 


$834 68 


- 


9,530 90 


5,511 92 


- 


11 


10 


- 


20 
21 
22 


- 


- 


- 


53 88 


- 


- 


30 


- 


- 


23 


■9,273 15 
29 40 


- 


- 


6,513 52 
76,959 69 


1,902 32 


2_ 
54 


13 

1,678 


13 

287 


- 


24 
25 
26 


15 12 


- 


- 


6,822 28 


2,129 75 


3 


58 


3 


31 


27 


1,699 40 


- 


30,000 00 


29,024 18 


12,011 75 


14 


84 


- 


- 


28 


1,425 92 
-3.037 94 


- 


- 


16,737 34 


_3 


9 


236 


2 


- 


29 
30 


379 39 

«,393 11 

180 00 


- 


- 


44,411 80 
1,900 68 


16,145 75 
1,445 95 


1 


- 


- 


- 


31 
32 
33 


39 93 


- 


- 


2,126 52 


1,550 00 


1 


261 


30 


' 


34 


2,409 93 
1.887 17 


5,000 00 


1,100 00 


15,812 84 
5,870 43 

1,820 00 


4,160 28 
3,433 72 


.5 
5 

- 


_ 
303 
237 

[ 17 


13 
142 


: 


35 
36 
37 

38 


11.190 92 


- 


- 


6,976 93 


2,161 42 


2 


7 


- 


- 


39 


2,500 00 




- 


34,723 20 


-3 


40 


1,012 


27 


- 


40 



Organizations aided. 



Not separately reported. 



96 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Total 
Property 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Ileal Estate 



Subscrip- 
tions, Dona- 
tions, etc. 



Nantucket. 
Children's Aid Society of Nantucket . 
Churchhaven, Nantucket, Inc.' . 
Nantucket Cottage Hospital 
Old iVoi)l(''s Home Association of Nantucket 
Relief .\.s.s()ciation. The .... 
Union Henevolent Society, The . 
Wauwinnet Tribe No. 158 Improved Order of 
Red Men 

Natick. 

Ijconard Morse Hospital 

Maria Hayes Home for Aged Persons 
Natick Visiting Nurse Association 

Needham. 
Glover Home and Hospital, The' 
King's Daughters Circle of '86, Inc. ' . 
Mothers' Rest Association of Newton Centre, The 

New Bedford. 
Animal Rescue League of New Bedford 
As.sociation for the Relief of Aged Women of 

New Bedford ...... 

Central Council of Social Agencies of New Bed 

ford. Inc. ....... 

Charity Brotherhood of the Holy Ghost of the 

North End of New Bedford, Mass., Inc.' 
Hebrew Ladies' Helping Hand Society 
Henryk Dabrowski Society • . . . 
Howland Fund for Aged Women, Trustees, of 

James Arnold Fund, Trustees of 

Ladies' City Mission Society in New Bedford 

New Bedford Anti-Tuberculosis Association 
New Bedford Children's Aid Society . 
New Bedford Country Week Society, Inc. . 
New Bedford Day Nursery 

New Bedford Dorcas Society 

New Bedford Family Welfare Society 

New Bedford Hebrew Ladies' Aid Society i 

New Bedford Home for Aged 

New Bedford Instructive Nursing Association 

New liedford Men's Mission, Inc. 

New Beflford Port Society .... 

New Bedford Port Society, Ladies Branch 

New Bedford Society of the Blessed Sacrament 
under the name of Vetera Romana Catholica 
Apostolica Ecclesia ...... 

New Bedford Women's Reform and Relief 
Association ........ 

New Bedford Young Men's Christian Association 

New Bedford Young Women's Christian Asso- 
ciation ....... 

North End Guild of New Bedford 

St. Luke's Hospital of New Bedford . 

St. Mary's Home of New Bedford 

Union for Good Works .... 

Winfred Goff HomcEopathic Hospital, The 

Newburyport. 

Anna Jaques Hospital 

Community Welfare Service of Newburyport, Inc. 

Essex North Branch Auxiliary to the Woman's 
Board of Missions of Boston .... 

General Charitable Society of Newburyport 

Hale Fund Relief Association of the Newbury- 
port Fire Department, The i . . . . 

Massachusetts Department of the Ladies of the 
Grand Army of the Republic 1 

Merrimack Humane Society .... 



S5,500 00 

92,309 79 

11,700 00 

29,000 00 

6,715 00 

10,000 00 



193,137 00 
79,977 24 



10,900 00 

4,153 05 
355,258 84 



200 00 

50,276 73 
118,751 54 

88,347 33 

240,999 15 

255,922 12 

10,700 00 

71,914 59 

19,876 71 

12,000 00 

61,688 82 
8,875 00 

82,625 00 
62,700 00 



5,000 00 



171,524 65 

40,918 87 

18,158 39 

,059,854 48 

150,000 00 

178,737 95 

7,000 00 



jl6,272 42 
60,538 43 



51,526 78 



15,468 84 



$5,700 00 



1,000 00 



3,100 00 



$22 00 

13,082 45 
2,720 00 
2,101 62 



1,956 65 

2,606 19 
1,882 08 



2,575 72 

1,852 38 
1 ,008 25 
5,760 94 

548 30 



301 25 



12,033 94 

9,699 51 

341 34 

4,881 73 


20 00 


22,214 79 


328 01 

352 99 

5,865 31 

900 00 

31 00 



549 31 



20,753 56 

34,766 03 
1,420 00 

17,053 04 
9,268 17 
3,695 00 



3,596 86 
2,688 91 



2,821 35 
22 00 



1 No report. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



97 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 


Legacies 
specifically 
restricted 
to Capital 


Unrestricted 
Legacies 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 

Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 

Number 

aided 


Total 

Number 

Free 


Number 

of 

Families 

aided 




$127 00 


_ 


_ 


$233 90 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
G 


2,069 61 
525 10 

1,567 24 
335 99 


- 


$3,660 63 
2,000 00 


16,548 41 

228 59 

2,463 50 

220 45 


-3 

$45 00 


10 
3 


194 

27 
24 


10 

27 

24 


8 


1,560 00 


- 


- 


5,934 50 


288 78 


3 


24 


- 


3 


7 


4,034 77 

3,045 66 

218 52 


- 


- 


53,754 61 

653 32 

3,406 07 


9,144 48 
1,690 00 


38 
1 


888 
237 


1 
97 


8 


S 

9 

10 


62 36 


$500 00 


- 


3,503 78 


965 60 


7 


350 


350 


138 


11 

12 
13 


115 31 


- 


2,100 00 


2,633 08 


1,300 00 


2 


- 


_ 


- 


14 


19,576 40 


14,378 14 


3,420 00 


23,553 60 


- 


- 


es 


40 


- 


15 


13 49 


_ 


- 


7,001 16 


5,056 74 


1 




- 


- 


16 


8 50 


: 


- 


789 34 


20 00 


~ 


42 


~ 


25 


17 
18 
19 
20 


2,971 19 


- 


- 


2,334 25 


- 


- 


36 


36 


- 


6,558 11 


- 


- 


6,735 94 


- 


- 


/ 62 

1 18 


} ^^ 


- 


21 


8,011 19 


- 


8,500 00 


16,269 58 


8,514 28 


8 


/ 62 

1 3,939 

288 

259 

110 

19,863 


j 575 


_ 


22 


3,183 58 

14,706 60 

447 08 

3,039 17 


6,451 33 
2,000 00 


3,500 00 


90,315 10 

43,094 71 

3,351 85 

15,479 72 


12,843 03 
8,534 73 


42 
10 

12 


1 

96 

102 

26 


132 


23 
24 
25 
26 


928 08 


- 


4,647 28 


939 59 


- 


- 


/ 32 
1 302 


} 302 


116 


27 


526 77 


- 


4,500 00 


22,721 04 


10,429 89 


9 


_ 


28 


— 


— 


- 


— 


— 


— 


— 


_ 


_ 


29 


3,228 18 
13,209 61 
4,300 00 
4,862 11 
3,559 63 


4,500 00 


437 52 
4,500 00 

2,000 00 


3,414 46 
25,338 35 
15,808 67 
3,435 92 
4,006 25 


1,016 25 
18,852 27 

995 00 
1,977 50 

600 00 


4 
14 

3 

1 


15 
2,553 

593 
10 


8 
988 


- 


30 
31 
32 
33 
34 


- 


- 


- 


1,005 94 


780 00 


1 


- 


- 


- 


35 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


36 


6,746 14 


- 


- 


38.800 14 


22,907 47 


9 


- 


- 


- 


37 


9,451 26 

1,025 95 

25,377 93 

451 33 

8,684 29 


15,000 00 


4,300 00 

13,767 70 
1,152 00 
5,010 00 


83,964 13 

29 69 

207,614 99 

16,053 04 

12,605 76 


22,268 48 

_3 

1,573 00 
5,733 75 


29 

166 
3 
16 


6,062 

378 

42 


459 

245 

42 


57 


38 
39 
40 
41 
42 


" 


~ 


~ 


~ 


~ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


43 


25,464 62 
2,064 24 


100 00 


_ 


69,269 28 
4,880 69 


2,367 15 


53 
2 


1,551 
563 


106 


143 


44 
45 


2,533 93 


- 


- 


2,915 26 
2,388 69 


150 00 


1 


12 


- 


30 


46 
47 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


48 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 




49 


445 77 


~ 


- 


4,503 26 


80 00 


- 


22 


- 


- 


50 



Organizations aided. 



Not separately reported. 



08 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Total 
Property 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 



Subscrip- 
tions, Dona- 
tions, etc. 



Newbcryport — Co7i. 
Moseley Fund for Social Service in Newburyport 

The 

Newburyport Anti-Tuberculosis Association 
Newburyport Hotlu'l Society 
Newburyport Female Cliaritable Society . 
Newburyport HoinaHipathic Hospital i 
Newburyport Howard lienevoleut Society 
Newburyport Society for the Relief of Aged Men 
Newburyport Society for the Relief of Aged 

Women 

Newburyport Young Men's Christian Association 
Roman Catholic Archbishop in Boston (Chil- 
dren's Home) ....... 

Young Women's Christian Association 

Newton. 
American Board of Commissioners for Foreign 

Missions (Walker Home) 

Boys' Welfare League, Inc 

Governor John A. Andrew Home Association 
Lucy Jackson Chapter, Daughters of the 

American Revolution 

Newton Circle, Incorporated, The 

Newton District Nursing Association 

Newton Hospital 

Newton Welfare Bureau, Inc 

Newton Young Men's Christian Association 
Rebecca Pomroy Newton Home for Orphan Girls, 

Corporation of the 

Senoj Lodge Associates, Inc. .... 

Stearns School Centre 



Stone Institute and Home for Aged People . 
Swedish Charitable Society of Greater Boston 
Twombley House, Inc., The 
West Newton Day Nursery, Inc., The 
Working Boys' Home 



Norfolk. 

King's Daughters' and Sons' Home for the Aged 

in Norfolk County ...... 

North Adams. 

North Adams Hospital 

Young Men's Christian Association of North 
Adams 1 

North Andover. 
Charlotte Home, The 



North Attleborough. 
North Attleborough District Nursing Association 



Northampton. 
Aid Association of Hampshire County 



Children' 

Clarke School for the Deaf 

Cooley Dickinson Hospital, Thei 

Lathrop Home for Aged and Invalid Women in 
Northampton 

Smith Students' Aid Society Incorporated . 

Students' Associated Housekeepers! . 

Wright Home for Young Women, The ^ 

Young Men's Christian Association of North- 
ampton 

NORTHBRIDGE. 

Whitinsville Hospital, Inc., The .... 

NORTHFIELD. 

Northfield Seminary Students' Aid Society 



$110,000 00 
14,593 12 



2,701 31 



92, 



63 



190,813 00 

77,838 72 



15,700 00 
33,270 00 



104,125 00 
1,200 00 
9,663 00 

5,000 00 
100 00 

599,338 13 

1,680 00 

198,234 39 

56,714 35 

2,500 00 

267,202 74 

39,821 57 

1,000 00 

9,234 05 

120,000 00 



54,426 67 
182,715 95 



56,275 00 
100 00 

19,756 10 
418,790 00 

212,850 00 
41,365 00 

263,039 54 

76,575 00 

39,621 75 



$7,800 00 
1,400 00 



15,000 00 



31,600 00 



$1,061 29 
26 50 



3 00 
484 02 



76 50 
3,965 73 



2,937 34 
707 00 



2,304 66 

3,196 03 

1,666 22 
1,021 00 

4,280 86 
32,034 30 

9,254 27 
29,111 72 

2,507 74 
1,113 60 

2,567 91 

4,595 49 
1,208 65 
1,295 10 
5,268 41 
43,497 75 



4,247 86 
2,965 33 



940 00 



8,425 49 
500 00 



282 09 
4,457 95 



8,736 50 
7,615 03 
1,261 00 



1 No report. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 99 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 


Legacies 
specifically 
restricted 
to Capital 


Unrestricted 
Legacies 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 
Number 
aided 


Total 

Number 

Free 


Number 

of 

Families 

aided 




$4,945 38 
630 71 
267 02 
187 16 


_ 


_ 


$4,996 94 

2,302 73 

350 64 

135 00 


$1,757 49 


1 

1 


1,447 
105 

5 


169 
105 


6 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 


- 
4,217 97 


$1,000 00 


- 


3,307 39 
6,000 92 


150 00 
2,113 78 


4 


93 
13 


93 
10 


- 


8,299 48 
2,792 13 


- 


- 


10,111 87 
15,670 02 


3,299 00 
5,621 82 


6 
4 


68 
620 


68 


- 


8 
9 


49 00 
2,236 29 


- 


- 


7,821 52 
14,112 34 


600 00 

5,587 03 


7 
13 


65 


5 

- 


5 


10 
11 


4,281 67 


1,910 80 


- 


14,897 28 


4,574 31 


8 


367 


- 


- 


12 
13 
14 


144 67 


- 


- 


8,322 79 


2,108 24 


4 


25 


- 


~ 


15 99 


- 


- 


1,198 36 


- 


- 


52 


- 


- 


15 


22 95 


- 


- 


2,934 23 


924 00 


1 


( rf 

2,283 
3,127 

1,400 


} 55 


25 


16 


37 76 

17,879 35 

353 34 

1,585 20 


12,100 00 
3,500 00 
11,159 23 


- 


6,258 76 
177,582 45 
15,242 11 
42,791 37 


4,860 00 

4,050 02 
12,720 21 


3 

162 

4 

5 


686 
499 

200 


94 


17 
18 
19 
20 


2,630 17 


- 


- 


6,556 97 
3,215 10 


2,427 30 
217 50 


2 

1 


22 
310 


19 
19 


- 


21 
22 


133 93 


- 


- 


3,353 55 


2,809 97 


2 


f 52 

1 485 
25 
44 
100 
445 
183 


44 

311 
55 


60 


23 


10,055 34 

496 67 
68 58 
81 09 
32 27 


- 


$10,150 00 
75 00 

7,654 05 


17,008 94 
5,948 37 
1,163 38 
5,276 67 

61,057 35 


6,035 39 
1,294 00 
595 65 
2,797 71 
4,716 40 


8 
3 
3 
6 
4 


259 


24 
25 
26 

27 
28 


1,691 78 


- 


- 


7,924 76 


2,790 28 


4 


- 


- 


- 


29 


3,993 44 


- 


150 00 


54,656 41 


- 


50 


1,383 


1,383 


- 


30 
31 


2,559 02 


- 


- 


737 48 


- 


- 


102 


14 


37 


32 


62 08 




- 


3,334 67 


1,648 34 


1 


300 


93 


250 


33 


224 36 


2,100 00 


_ 


14,328 35 


5,178 19 


6 


f 92 

I 113 


} ^^ 


_ 


34 


10,463 44 


- 




126,200 56 


56,586 42 


66 


- 


35 
36 


6,075 05 
2,760 89 


15,570 27 


- 


9,206 45 
9,559 29 


4,569 46 
33 94 


7 


30 
35 


35 


- 


37 
38 
39 
40 


12,634 10 


- 


- 


17,035 24 


1,905 00 


2 


7 


7 


- 


500 00 


- 


- 


14,696 45 


6,301 80 


3 


775 


500 


- 


41 


1,357 64 


- 


- 


19,584 01 


- 


16 


646 


- 


- 


42 


520 24 


- 


- 


5,338 90 


- 


- 


38 


- 


- 


43 



Organizations aided. 



100 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 


Incum- 


Subscrip- 


Earnings 






Property 


brances on 


tions, Dona- 


and 






reported 


Real Estate 


tions, etc. 


Refunds 




Norton. 










I 


Barro\vs\'illc Communitj' Service Corporation . 


- • 


- 


S31 00 


- 




Norwood. 










2 


Norwood Civic Association i . . . . 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


3 


Norwood Hospital 


$66,282 92 


- 


13,219 53 


S30,933 90 


4 


Norwood Lithuanian Socialist Association . 
Oak Bluffs. 


12,000 00 


S4,875 00 


101 50 


908 62 


5 


Martha's Vineyard Hospital, Inc. 
Oxford. 


9,000 00 




15,611 75 


42 00 


6 


Oxford Home for Aged People .... 
Palmer. 


41,055 63 


2,000 00 


23 00 


2,885 45 


7 


Wing Memorial Hospital Association . 
Peabody. 


8,000 00 




5,172 87 


10,158 42 


8 


Charles B. Haven Home for Aged Men in Peabody 


70,438 02 


- 


- 


- 


9 


Female Benevolent Society at South Danvers . 


22,482 13 


- 


629 69 


_ 


10 


Isaac Munroe Home for Orphan and Needy 












Children 


19,072 47 


- 


- 


_ 


11 


Ladies Auxiliary of the Congregation Anshe 












Sfard of Peabody, Massachusetts ' . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


12 


Peabody Community House, Inc., The^ . 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


13 


Peabody Finnish Workingmen's Association 


7,000 00 


4,300 00 


_ 


_ 


14 


Peabody Hebrew Ladies' Aid Association . 


- 


- 


616 68 


- 


15 


Peabody Visiting Nurse Association . 


- 


- 


429 10 


1,436 40 


16 


"Soldiers and Sailors Association of Peabody" 












Veterans of the World War, Inc. 1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


17 


Sutton Home for Aged Women in Peabody 
Petersham. 


76,222 36 


" 


54 00 


700 00 


18 


Petersham Exchange, The 

Pittsfield. 


1,500 00 


" 


191 96 


6,966 26 


19 


Associated Charities of Pittsfield 


7,500 00 


_ 


5,489 31 


18 00 


20 


Berkshire Branch of Woman's Board of Missions 












in Boston 


1,000 00 


- 


11,610 51 


- 


21 


Berkshire County Home for Aged Women . 


281,096 81 


- 


2,985 85 


70 27 


22 


Berkshire County Society for the Care of Crip- 












pled and Deformed Children, The . 


1,299,409 27 


- 


18,810 82 


5,101 52 


23 


Boylan Memorial Hospital of Pittsfield, Mass., 












Inc., The 


75,000 00 


12,000 00 


1,324 34 


•30,560 78 


24 


Boys' Club of Pittsfield 


262,000 00 


- 


5,246 50 


4,473 59 


25 


Epworth Mission of Pittsfield .... 


11,500 00 


- 


1,023 76 


_ 


26 


Hillcrest Surgical Hospital 


42,000 00 


5,500 00 


267 00 


39,394 47 


27 


House of Mercy 


282,017 15 


- 


65,793 47 


99,978 31 


28 


Maple wood Institute Association of Pittsfield, 












Massachusetts! 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


29 


Pittsfield Anti-Tuberculosis Association i . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


30 


Pittsfield Day Nursery Association * . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


31 


Pittsfield Young Men's Christian Association' . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


32 


Visiting Nurse Association of Pittsfield 


10,000 00 


- 


3,509 50 


5,486 74 


33 


Working Girls' Club of Pittsfield < 
Plymouth. 




' 


" 


" 


34 


Boys' Club of Pb-mouth 


1,051 00 


- 


3,576 00 


707 86 


35 


Jordan Hospital, The 


290,914 97 


- 


1,249 71 


39,538 49 


36 


Plymouth Community Nurse Association, In- 












corporated 


- 


- 


357 00 


1,387 95 


37 


PbTnouth Fragment Society .... 


31,926 04 


- 


126 00 


-^ 


38 


Ryder Home for Old People, Corporation of 


28,997 14 


_ 


537 31 


675 20 


39 


Sunnyside, Inc 

Princeton. 


2,500 00 




2,662 15 




40 


Girls' Vacation House Association 
Provincetown. 


37,738 35 




2,509 19 


1,908 00 


41 


Provincetown Helping Hand Society . 


50,000 00 




- 


- 



No report. 



* Report not due. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 101 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



Interest 
Dividends, 

Annuities 
and Rentals 


Legacies 
specifically 
restricted 
to Capital 


Unrestricted 
Legacies 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 

Number 

aided 


Total 

Number 

Free 


Number 

of 

Families 

aided 




$500 00 
594 00 


- 


- 


. 842,540 83 
555 71 


- 


50 


1,507 

22 


13 


- 


1 

2 
3 
4 


45 30 


- 


- 


12,283 41 


S401 00 


5 


14 


1 


- 


5 


- 


- 


- 


10,333 67 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6 


9 96 


- 


- 


17,231 73 


- 


8 


472 




- 


7 


1,728 60 
945 51 


_ 


_ 


1,498 59 
1,671 94 


336 20 
50 00 


1 


3 


3 


24 


8 
9 


1,080 58 


$9,758 21 


- 


303 85 


41 50 


- 


- 


- 


- 


10 


11 83 

83 28 


- 


- 


1,897 19 
768 21 

2,311 68 


580 00 
1.404 17 


3 

1 


4 

f 12 

1 392 


4 

1 ,; 


_ 
2 
10 

37 


11 
12 
13 
14 

15 


3,171 71 


10,300 00 


- 


4,305 86 


1,224 01 


3 


9 


7 




16 
17 


- 


- 


- 


7,332 34 


1,418 05 


7 


95 


- 


- 


18 


799 17 


- 


- 


6,200 81 


2,224 50 


2 


- 


- 


397 


19 


50 00 
11,763 59 


- 


$50,097 49 


155 93 
64.937 07 


5,110 30 


7 


12 

26 


26 


- 


20 
21 


15,018 20 


- 


50,000 00 


31,352 27 


14,895 34 


12 


36 


36 


- 


22 


11,679 44 

298 54 
16,235 55 


- 


- 


30,155 73 
22,010 43 
1,003 21 
42,290 48 
198,101 55 


7,688 95 
11,317 50 

49,816 37 


30 
27 

36 
5 


1,118 
1,500 

6,232 
5,570 


21 
1,500 

25 
3,261 


- 


23 
24 
25 

26 

27 


1,184 10 


~ 


- 


12,233 41 


9,777 62 


8 


1,010 


410 


- 


28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 


50 00 
9,844 97 


10,000 00 


_ 


3.124 28 
51.301 81 


2,103 00 


84 


476 
1,248 


124 
31 


- 


34 
35 


1.791 95 
1,058 53 


- 


1,600 00 
5,847 08 


1,881 81 

7,262 94 

2,259 58 
2,662 15 


1,654 00 

612 00 
1,144 40 


1 
4 


203 

f 22 

I 20 
24 


6 

} : 

24 


25 


36 

37 

38 
39 


1,362 04 


- 


- 


7,647 24 


1,637 00 


9 


195 


2 


- 


40 


2,357 28 


- 


- 


2,224 77 


- 


- 


{ ^r 


\ - 

I 


42 


41 



- Organizations aided. 



102 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Total 
Property 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 



Subscrip- 
tions, Dona- 
tions, etc. 



QrixcY. 
Brackett Charitable Trust, Incorporated . 
City Hospital of Quincy .... 
Family Welfare Society of Quincy, Mass., The 
National Sailors' Home 
Quincy Charitable Society . 
Quincy Day Nursery Association 

Quincy Women's Club 

Sailors' Snug Harbor of Boston . 

Wollaston Woman's Club 

Young Men's Christian Association of Quincy 

R.^NDOLPH. 

Boston School for the Deaf 

Seth Mann, 2d Home for Aged and Infirm Women 

Readi.vg. 
Reading Home for Aged Women ^ . . . 
Reading Visiting Nurse Association . 

Revere. 

Beachmont Catholic Club 

Hebrew Ladies' Charitable Association of Revere i 

Home for Aged People in Revere 

Ingleside Corporation ...... 

Revere Visiting Nurse Association, Inc. 

ROCKL.VXD. 

French Home for Aged Women i . . . 

Rockland Young Men's Christian Association i . 

RUTL.VXD. 

Central New England Sanatorium, Inc. 
Rutland Masonic Charitable and Educational 
Association 1 

Salem. 

Associated Charities of Salem, Mass. . 

Association for the Relief of Aged and Destitute 
Women in Salem 

Bertram Home for Aged Men 

Children's Island Sanitariimi, The 

City Orphan Asylum . 

Gemilath Chesed of Salem, Inc. . 

House of the Seven Gables Settlement Asso- 
ciation, The .... 

Independent Polish Socialist Society Inc. Salem 
Branch 

Mack Industrial School 

Marine Society at Salem in New England 

North Shore Babies' Hospital, The . 

Plummer Farm School of Reform for Boys, The 

Salem Animal Rescue League ... 

Salem Association for the Prevention of Tuber- 
culosis 

Salem Charitable Mechanic Association 

Salem East India Marine Society 

Salem Female Charitable Society 

Salem Fraternity 

Salem Hebrew Ladies' Aid Society . 

Salem Hospital 

Salem Relief Committee (Inc.) ... 

Salem Seamen's Orphan and Children's Friend 
Society 

Salem War Chest Association 

Salem Young Men's Christian Association 

Salem Young Women's Association 

Samaritan Society, The 

Sarah E. Sherman Memorial Association i 

Seamen's Widow and Orphan Association 

Woman's Friend Society 



$5,000 00 
109,183 14 

260,671 02 

13,180 00 

200 00 

2,700 00 

308,867 44 
2,791 03 
11,300 00 



171,000 00 
174,334 90 



2,500 00 



8,721 41 
90,276 64 



72,682 92 



27,559 13 

408,858 33 

219,060 69 

77,131 20 

34,600 00 



33,435 85 



4,500 00 
69,215 23 



54,887 75 
162,297 31 



2,500 00 

5,030 71 

32,700 00 

33,089 00 

155,176 30 

,201,681 75 
2,500 00 

237,134 31 

233,369 00 

8,000 00 

56,710 25 

72,712 39 
49,865 12 



S19,000 00 



1,300 00 



7,612 44 



1,500 00 



9,000 00 
3,920 00 



S3, 130 15 

31 26 
154 00 

7,770 49 



1,953 75 
9,543 00 



14,400 00 



1,075 64 
722 71 



3,553 10 
931 70 



10,030 31 



6,491 16 

70 73 
12,403 00 

226 25 

10,603 22 

94 85 
2,307 43 

273 85 

449 65 

4,773 20 



114 00 
571 00 
640 90 
462 20 
1,195 05 



82,000 00 

1,100 00 

206 75 



2,836 03 



No report. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



103 



Interest. 
Dividends, 

Annuities 
and Rentals 


Legacies 
specifically 

restricted 
to Capital 


Unrestricted 
Legacies 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 

Number 

aided 


Total 

Number 

Free 


Number 

of 

Families 

aided 




S23 75 






S161 01 












1 


5,392 41 


S2,258 00 


_ 


614 36 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


23 38 




- 


3,428 24 


S2,012 00 


2 


1,905 


- 


381 


3 


13,361 90 


- 


- 


14,396 12 


2,654 33 


6 


15 


15 


- 


4 


834 56 


- 


- 


799 38 


- 


- 


2 - 


- 


28 


5 


338 21 


- 


SI ,000 00 


124 62 


25 00 


2 


- 


- 


- 


6 


111 96 


- 


- 


9,183 24 


5,506 15 


5 


/ 82 

I 1,813 
25 


} 349 


- 


7 


14,328 03 


_ 


2,000 00 


13,600 06 


3,192 03 


5 


25 


_ 


8 


75 92 


_ 




4,285 66 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


9 


678 75 


11,351 79 


- 


27,816 79 


9,696 36 


2 


1,500 


1,500 


~ 


10 


1.470 60 






53,100 35 


29,036 22 


39 


176 






11 


8,236 22 


769 29 


" 


5,273 49 


3,178 81 


2 


5 


5 


" 


12 


- 


- 


- 


1,965 08 


1,520 52 


1 


285 


93 


- 


13 
14 


18 39 


- 


- 


1,877 78 


- 


- 


156 


156 


42 


15 
16 
17 


332 62 


_ 


_ 


310 98 


_ 


z 


z 


z 


_ 




200 00 


_ 


9,100 77 


3,651 79 


7 


31 


3 


- 


18 


3 96 






1.745 85 


1,290 51 


1 


555 


93 


22 


19 
20 


- 


- 


- 


136,759 97 


22,432 40 


3 


150 


100 


- 


21 

22 
23 


1,558 75 


_ 


_ 


8,188 65 


4,410 08 


2 


_ 


_ 


315 


24 


14,824 02 


2,432 00 


_ 


16,991 96 


6,659 05 


13 


40 


40 


_ 


25 


10,555 47 


10,000 00 


- 


7,567 18 


2,641 73 


5 


19 


19 


- 


26 


4,403 47 


- 


- 


18,011 14 


- 


27 


129 


129 


_ 


27 


754 69 


_ 


_ 


342 56 


_ 








_ 


28 




- 


- 


1,170 50 


- 


- 


40 


- 


- 


29 


1,603 36 


- 


- 


14,229 98 


8,417 34 


15 


- 


- 


- 


30 


70 50 


_ 


_ 


517 50 


36 48 


1 


2 


2 


2 


31 


2,712 41 


500 00 


_ 


7,933 30 


5,758 21 


6 


300 




_ 


32 


9,956 94 




- 


9,856 30 


1,740 00 




20 


20 


_ 


33 


360 00 


- 


- 


7,878 04 




18 


94 


50 


- 


34 


7,125 53 


- 


- 


13,986 56 


4,631 00 


7 


41 


15 


- 


35 


12 09 


- 


- 


752 98 


- 


1 






- 


36 


117 53 


_ 


_ 


4,943 53 


2,766 60 


5 


222 


222 


16 


37 


165 26 


- 


- 


562 99 


75 00 










38 


1,524 10 


- 


- 


1,450 00 


300 00 


_ 


11 


_ 


_ 


39 


1,478 66 


- 


- 


1,612 06 




_ 


70 


70 


_ 


40 


6,036 01 


- 


20,128 89 


5.902 45 


3,867 68 


3 


4,000 




- 


41 


- 


- 


- 


1,182 72 


- 


- 


25 


- 


10 


42 


43,518 78 


- 


4,882 50 


487,548 09 


- 


126 


3,555 


411 




43 


140 00 


- 


1,000 00 


2,859 38 


720 00 


1 


- 


- 


75 


44 


10,932 91 


14,850 00 


_ 


13,831 82 


5,856 00 


9 


47 


6 


_ 


45 


647 73 


- 


- 


25 00 


_ 


_ 


_ 




_ 


46 


16,625 85 


- 


- 


32,954 75 


13,625 77 


5 


950 


- 


- 


47 


1,551 29 


- 


- 


4,922 79 


2,041 30 


3 




_ 


_ 


48 


1,220 97 


- 


889 55 


2,139 56 






104 


104 


47 


49 


— 


— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 




_ 


50 


3,912 88 


- 


- 


3,943 65 


250 00 


_ 


35 


35 


_ 


51 


1.7G7 96 


~ 


~ 


13,776 56 


5,874 74 


7 


451 


218 


- 


52 



- Organizations aided. 



104 



DEPAIIT:\IENT of public welfare. [P. D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Total 
Property 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 



Subscrip- 
tions, Dona 
tions, etc. 



Saugus. 
Women's Civic League of Cliftondale, Inc., The' 

SCITUATE. 

Children's Sunlight Repair Shop, Inc. 

Sharon. 

Boston Lakeshore Home 

Sharon Playground and Recreation Association ' 
Sharon Sanatorium i 



Sherborn. 

Sherborn Widows' and Orphans' Benevolent 

Society 

Shirley. 
Altrurian Club of Shirley 



SOMERVILLE. 

Associated Charities of Somervillc 

Hutchinson Home Corporation for Aged Women 

Institution of the Little Sisters of the Poor 

' Somerville Boys' Club i 

I Somerville Home for the Aged .... 

Somerville Hospital . . . . . 

Somerville Hospital Ladies' Aid Association 

Somerville Young Men's Christian Association . 

Visiting Nursing Association of Somerville 
Washington Street Day Nursery of Somerville . 

SOUTHBRIDGE. 

Young Men's Christian Association of South- 
bridge 

Spencer. 

Spencer Good Samaritan and District Nurse 

Association 

Springfield. 
Baby Feeding Association of Springfield . 
Daughters of Zion Old Peoples' Homei 
Good Shepherd Association of Springfield, The . 

Good Will, Inc., The 



Hampden County Children's Aid Association . 

Horace Smith Fund, The 

James W. Hale Fund, Trustees of . . . 

Mercy Hospital 

Particular Council of the Society of St. Vincent 
de Paul of Springfield, Mass., The . 

St. John's Institutional Activities 

St. Mark's Community House, Inc. . 

Springfield Association for the Prevention of 
Tuberculosis 

Springfield Boys' Club 

Springfield Child Welfare Society, Inc. 

Springfield Day Nursery Corporation 

Springfield Federation for Charity and Philan- 
thropy Inc. 1 

Springfield Girls' Club 

Springfield Home for Aged Men .... 

Springfield Home for Aged Women 

Springfield Home for Friendless Women and 
Children 

Springfield Hospital, The 

Springfield Rescue Mission, The 

Springfield Visiting Nurse Association, The 

Springfield Young Men's Christian Association . 

Springfield Young Women's Christian Association 

Union Relief Association 

Wesson Maternity Hospital 

Wesson Memorial Hospital . . . . 



S9.000 00 
74,000 00 



2,703 61 



54,531 03 

64,000 00 

156,272 04 

99,391 52 

1,139 40 

53,493 00 

1,100 00 



20,600 00 



96,400 00 
11,900 00 

66,100 00 
241,241 80 

34,000 00 
256,855 28 



19,500 00 
12,000 00 



106,000 00 
106,844 65 



6,800 00 
193,991 87 
362,289 45 

269,604 02 

985,835 68 

63,300 00 

538,172 23 
208,774 25 

536,300 00 
500,000 00 



S6,000 00 
5,000 00 



25,000 00 



9,500 00 



2,500 00 
7,400 00 



2,500 00 
102,500 00 

4,500 00 



S8,217 46 
3,350 22 



7 00 

319 20 

3,247 45 

9,791 89 

779 22 

7,860 00 

200 02 

4,512 00 

676 35 
72 00 

3,129 57 

560 55 



9,045 67 
9,141 00 
8,692 90 



50 00 

10,289 00 
8,372 25 
2,313 00 



20,105 00 
8,510 00 

6,462 96 
9,500 00 

6,775 00 
137 32 

6,403 75 
26,100 00 
21,478 05 
22,387 10 
44,965 68 



No report. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



105 



Legacies 
specifically 
restricted 
to Capital 



Unrestricted 
Legacies 



Current 
Expenditures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Total 


Total 


S' umber 


Number 


aided 


Free 



Number 

of 

Families 
aided 



S8,591 



2,000 00 
1,264 28 



1,100 00 



5,000 00 



12,300 00 
1,161 25 



5,500 00 



SI, 143 00 



1,000 00 
12,483 11 

1,000 00 



1,529 15 

1,300 00 

140 00 



6,146 25 



2,140 00 



S9,215 96 
10,064 00 



679 50 



358 99 



7,145 71 

3,468 03 

21,617 00 

8,988 70 
53,740 88 
2,193 84 

65,885 00 

5,875 62 
151 37 



18,156 44 



1,871 24 



35,902 69 

11,648 40 

16,476 87 

525 43 

1,942 62 

137,815 81 

10,456 00 
3,570 93 
3,184 05 



23,755 80 
13,535 31 



7,217 97 
5,553 74 

27.071 55 

21,505 25 
254,439 70 

14.072 24 
33,725 87 

159,598 89 
74,805 78 
64,096 26 
72,964 82 
94.167 24 



82,069 58 
3,015 49 



1,691 50 



2,859 26 



7,685 00 
4,995 00 



5,225 02 



1,345 00 



6,397 00 

3,415 00 

4,880 00 
425 00 



4,566 03 
1,752 40 



9,428 80 
6,751 62 



4,334 42 
1,842 76 
8,802 90 

8,655 81 

8.215 31 
28,440 33 
67,631 54 
37,414 46 
16,124 74 



50 
385 



9 
274 



22 
560 



35: 



32 
,290 



2 


424 


4 


310 


3 


f 42 
I 56 


4 


125 


1 


59 


- 


506 


108 


4,968 


_ 


780 


3 


40 


- 


1,200 


3 


3 


10 


1,700 


12 


235 


7 


530 


3 


9 


10 


70 


18 


257 


189 


4,569 


7 


24,663 


15 


5,884 


67 


_ 


42 


127,524 


10 


- 


61 


944 


90 


2,145 



50 
270 



274 



3,052 
2,042 



176 



303 
20 
63 

506 
306 



169 

270 

2,363 

4,135 

32,413 



95 



Organizations aided. 



106 DEP.\RTMEXT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Total 
Property 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 



Subscrip- 
tions, Dona- 
tions, etc. 



bTOCKBRIDOE. 

Axisten Riggs Foundation Inc. 



bTON'EHAM. 

Home for Aged People in Stoneham . 
Stoneham Visiting 5surse .Association 

Stow. 
Red Acre Farm, Incorporated 1 . 

Sutton. 
Wilkinsonville Community Association 

SWAMPSCOTT. 

Florence Crittenton Rescue League 



Rest House, Inc. 



Swansea. 



TArXTON. 

Helping Hand 



Society of 



Bethlehem Home 
9 I Hebrew Ladies' 
I Taunton 

10 I Morton Hospital 

11 Social Welfare League, Inc. of Taunton 

12 Taunton Boys' Club Association of Taunton 

13 Taunton Female Charitable Association 

14 Young Men's Christian Association of Taunton 



15 



Templeton. 
Hospital Cottages for Children, The . 

UXBRIDGE. 

Uxbridge Samaritan Society 

Wakefield. 
Elizabeth E. Boit Home for Aged Women . 

Wakefield Hebrew Ladies' Charitable Society 

Wakefield Visiting Nurse Association . 

W'alpole. 
Walp>ole Visiting Nurse Association 

Waltham. 
Fellowship House Inc. i 
Leland Home for Aged Women . 
Mt. Prospect School, The 
Waltham Animal Aid Society 
Waltham Baby Hospital, The 
Waltham Day Nursery .Association' 
Waltham District Nursing .Association 
Waltham Graduate Nurse .Association* 
Waltham Hospital .... 

Waltham Social Ser\-ice League . 
Waltham War Chest -Association 
Yoimg Men's Hebrew .Association of Waltham i 

Ware. 
Ware Visiting Nurse and Hospital -Association . 

Watertown. 
Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School 

for the Blind 

Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for 

the Blind Kindergarten for the Blind) . 
Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for 

the Blind (Hull Memorial Press Fund) . 

Sunny Bank Home ^ 

\yatertown .Associated Charities .... 
Watertown District Nursing .Association 
Watertown Home for Old Folks .... 



$112,000 00 
30,843 87 

1,200 00 

7,500 00 

129.454 21 

11,000 00 



195,844 52 
3,600 00 
35,000 00 
83,332 42 
45,000 00 



510,865 84 



17,000 00 



89,501 56 

89,268 43 

50 00 

34,463 46 

3,750 00 

409,389 59 



519,467 75 

1,425,466 46 

1.894.644 42 

161,464 89 

48,746 00 



$45,000 00 



2.000 00 



15.000 00 



25,000 00 



$29,329 73 



46 00 
1,126 75 



667 62 
1,881 43 

11.691 71 

332 24 
22,664 62 
3,584 41 
5,400 37 
1,265 00 
6,563 00 

4,398 46 

1,418 50 

12,367 48 

94 85 

1,666 31 

1.626 46 



743 00 

58,947 64 

225 83 

1,623 38 

1,888 75 

24,095 02 
3.448 23 



3.622 10 

4.589 00 
15 00 



114 75 

700 19 
547 89 



No report. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 107 

'Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



Interest, 
Dividends, 

Annuities 
and Rentals 


Legacies 
specifically 
restricted 
to Capital 


Unrestricted 
Legacies 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 

Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 

Number 

aided 


Total 

Number 

Free 


Number 

of 

Families 

aided 




- 


- 


- 


S76,253 48 


S4,860 00 


21 


111 


53 


- 


1 


SI, 3 79 18 
49 78 


: 


sioo 00 


9 00 
2,094 88 


1,673 45 


1 


689 


30 


7 


2 
3 

4 


- 


_ 


_ 


6,063 09 


1,023 00 


3 


84 


2 


~ 


5 

6 


4,477 80 


- 


- 


11,424 19 


4,285 60 


5 


552 


- 


- 


7 


195 62 


- 


400 00 


20,007 13 


5,571 47 


10 


118 


101 


- 


8 


5.022 88 

177 65 

68 95 

3,628 07 


S3, 000 00 


500 00 


395 11 

78,359 72 

5,634 68 

7.705 56 

6.675 06 

14,989 58 


3,250 00 
4,535 18 
2,434 98 
8,777 28 


50 
3 
4 
3 
6 


5 
2,055 

416 

14 

1.500 


5 

40 

57 

14 

900 


1 
219 


9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 


20,703 49 


14,145 00 


- 


56,782 96 


25,768 26 


45 


148 


10 


- 


15 


238 00 


- 


- 


2,324 05 


1,550 00 


2 


312 


- 


- 


16 


1,428 47 


- 


- 


14,008 37 
112 79 


1,291 36 


2 


12 

{ r 

270 


11 

1 .; 


2 


17 
18 


111 13 


- 


- 


3,070 90 


1,706 40 


2 


250 


19 


- 


- 


- 


2,154 53 


1,365 00 


1 


292 


- 


- 


20 


3,232''23 

2,682 63 

42 33 

1,697 37 


- 


6,537 81 


3,857 39 
849 88 
540 97 

5,775 63 


1,379 00 


3 
33 


13 

633 
71 


13 

633 
26 


- 


21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 


140 70 


- 


- 


3,726 37 


1,200 00 


1 


556 


253 


- 


12,921 78 


16,500 00 


- 


116,578 49 
3.420 47 


29,845 28 
1,552 25 


81 
2 


2,556 


180 

: 


124 


1,976 50 


13.697 97 


- 


17,805 81 


- 


10 


334 


10 


~ 


33 


44.559 02 


36,830 33 


- 


120,578 48 


61.673 31 


178 


183 


16 


- 


34 


75.247 32 


42,972 80 


- 


110,342 46 


46,590 91 


178 


125 


- 


- 


35 


10,840 25 


- 


- 


20.982 51 


7.315 75 


178 


3.146 


- 


- 


36 
37 
38 
39 
40 


64 62 
3,340 71 


- 


50 00 


123 92 
3,195 01 
3,428 80 


2,964 43 
1,004 91 


3 
3 


43 

680 

9 


43 

86 

9 


I 



2 Organizations aided. 



108 DEPART:\IEXT of public welfare. [P. D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Total 
Property 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 



Subscrip- 
tions, Dona- 
tions, etc. 



Webster. 

Club Gagnon, Inc 

Forest iers Franco-Americains .... 

Wellesley. 

Convalescent Home of the Children's Hospital, 

The 



Wellesley Friendly Aid Association 
Wellesley Students' Aid Society, Inc. 



The 



Westborough. 

Kirkside, Inc., The 

Westborough District Nurse Association . 

W'ESTFIELD. 

Noble Hospital, Trustees of .... 

Roman Catholic Polish Daughters of Westfield^ 
Sarah Gillett Home for Aged People, The . 
ShurtlefT Mission to the Children of the Destitute, 

The 

Young Men's Christian Association of Westfield 

Westford. 
Ladies' Sew-ing Society and Women's Branch 
Alliance of the Unitarian Church . 

West Springfield. 
Animal Rescue League of Hampden County i 

Weymouth. 
Weymouth Hospital Association ^ 
Weymouth Visiting Nurse Association, Inc. 

WHITM.A.N. 

Rogers Home for Aged W^omen . 

WlXCHEXDON. 

Winchendon Home for Aged People i . 

W^ixchester. 
Home for Aged People in Winchester . 
Winchester Visiting Nurse Association 

WiNTHROP. 

Tiforeth Israel Congregation 
Winthrop Visiting Nurse Association, Incorpo 
rated 

WOBURN. 

Home for Aged Women in Woburn 

Winning Home ....... 

Woburn Charitable Association i . 

Young Men's Christian Association of W'oburn . 

W^orcester. 
Animal Rescue League of Worcester . 
Associated Charities of Worcester 
Association of Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy 

Bikor Cholim Society 1 

Board of Swedish Lutheran Old People's Home 

of Worcester, Mass 

Fairlawn Hospital, Inc 

Girls' Welfare Society of Worcester, Inc. 

Guild of St. Agnes of Worcester .... 
Home Association for Aged Colored People 
Home for Aged Men in Worcester 
Home for Aged Women in the City of Worcester, 

Trustees of 

Jewish Home for Aged and Orphans of Worcester, 

Mass., Inc. 



$15,000 00 
5,000 00 



$12,000 00 



354,564 85 



3,910 00 



79,697 50 
100 00 



150,000 00 
39,266 38 



89,602 41 
30,000 00 



10,500 00 



34,000 00 



10.000 00 



26,984 11 



46,382 98 
93,317 45 



16,000 00 2,500 00 



81,650 78 
49,366 46 



10,500 00 
35,179 50 
183,986 00 



40,000 00 
60,000 00 

13,686 57 

56,385 00 

3,091 67 

303,993 06 

344,856 17 



20,000 00 



13,000 00 



$880 85 



6.541 20 
2,837 04 
14,019 73 



706 81 



95 14 



2.500 00 
9,797 81 



2,143 95 
684 28 



3,275 58 
7,808 50 



3,693 59 
373 60 

385 75 



1,365 28 
60,172 00 
19,996 52 



3,394 00 
38,608 10 

8,183 40 

4,097 26 
1,101 91 
1,485 00 

35 00 

16,794 22 



No report. 



PartIL] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 109 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



Interest, 
Dividends, 

Annuities 
ind Rentals 


Legacies 
specifically 
restricted 
to Capital 


Unrestricted 
Legacies 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 

Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 

Number 

aided 


Total 

Number 

Free 


Number 

of 

Families 

aided 




$100 00 


- 


- 


S3, 602 60 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 

2 


14,120 96 


_ 


111,250 00 


57,557 27 


$19,102 90 


25 


463 


301 


_ 


3 


49 13 


- 


- 


3,754 47 


1,765 35 


4 


/ 1^ 
1 400 


I 


25 


4 


833 51 


- 


- 


14,603 70 


_ 


- 


69 




- 


5 


2,041 64 


- 


- 


3,284 61 
1,178 15 


1,362 48 
1,137 00 


3 

1 


8 
80 


1 
12 


- 


6 

7 


1,013 20 


- 


950 00 


53,994 83 


14,042 15 


45 


912 


22 


- 


8 


537 50 


- 


- 


6,719 16 


2,317 08 


4 


15 


1 


- 


9 
10 


4,746 12 
1,922 35 


$82,099 41 


- 


4,054 09 
13,208 82 


1,350 00 
4,628 56 


3 

4 


19 


3 


- 


11 
12 


520 23 


- 


- 


454 03 


- 


- 


- 


- 


7 


13 
14 


74 31 


_ 


_ 


4,888 34 


3,197 17 


2 


712 


112 


106 


15 
16 


665 51 


- 


- 


3,484 84 


830 75 


2 


7 


- 


- 


17 


1,613 30 
4,644 84 


1,540 00 
150 00 


50 00 


6,426 47 
57,311 73 


2,936 85 


4 
44 


12 
1,101 


12 
30 


: 


18 

19 
20 


227 59 


- 


- 


6,859 13 


2,226 32 


2 


- 


- 


- 


21 


36 44 


- 


- 


2,905 90 


2,580 83 


2 


2,925 


1,105 


44 


22 


191 26 
1,223 35 


1,385 11 


- 


3,838 93 
2,972 66 


1,426 34 


3 


11 


11 


- 


23 
24 

OK 


577 07 


- 


- 


255 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


26 


540 35 
1,666 16 
1,543 38 


- 


824 00 

575 00 

1,304 02 


1,631 97 
67,302 99 
54,314 74 


646 50 
9,095 55 
2,471 51 


3 
6 
3 


545 


40 


1,009 
12 


27 
28 
29 
30 


30 13 


- 


1,000 00 


11,884 00 
16,786 75 


1,215 00 
1,752 38 


2 
1 


16 


- 


- 


31 
32 


309 29 


- 


632 29 


9,372 32 


4,238 59 


5 


/ 252 
1 152 


} «; 

348 
34 


- 


33 


10,485 75 


- 


- 


16,436 22 

1,337 75 

15,708 00 


2,858 71 

389 12 

4,237 98 


17 

1 
8 


484 

7 

34 


49 


34 
35 
36 


14,286 96 


6,952 68 


- 


16,801 04 


7.233 10 


11 


39 


34 


- 


37 


103 92 


- 


- 


18,942 32 


7,847 94 


6 


41 


35 


- 


38 



2 Organizations aided. 



110 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 
Property 
reported 


Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 


Subscrip- 
tions, Dona- 
tions, etc. 


Earnings 

and 
Refunds 


1 

2 
3 


WoRCESTEn — Con. 
Little Franciscan Sisters of Mary 
Memorial Home for the Blind, The . 
Memorial Hospital 


$91,977 64 

110,800 96 

1,047,237 27 


$4,000 00 
5,300 00 


$5,728 30 
1,964 00 
3,865 92 


$31,728 57 

3,545 48 

148,312 95 


4 


North Worcester Aid Society .... 


2,500 00 


- 


39 50 


891 77 


5 

ti 

8 

9 

10 


Odd Fellows' Home of Massachusetts 
Relief Organization for Lithuania ' . . . 
Rotary Club Education Fund of Worcester, The 
St. Anne's French Canadian Orphanage 
St. Vincent's Hospital of Worcester, Massachusetts 
Society of the Franco-.\merican Dispensary of 
Worcester, Massachusetts, The .... 


384,601 95 

127,000 00 
300,000 00 


23,000 00 
100,000 00 


49,518 00 

2,990 00 
3,187 43 
1,214 51 

997 90 


40,401 69 
132,211 13 

3,596 13 


11 


Temporary Home and Day Nursery Society 


106,880 99 


- 


7,905 00 


2,178 37 


12 
13 
14 
15 


United Jewish Charities, Inc., The! . 

Worcester Boys' Club 

Worcester Children's Friend Society . 
Worcester City Missionary Society 


74,900 00 

228,300 12 

29,763 00 


- 


27,015 00 

24,229 24 

2,294 60 


11,081 81 
14,158 58 


16 


Worcester Civic League, Inc 


12,100 00 


4,700 00 


7,407 00 


- 


17 


Worcester Employment Society, The . 


63,777 63 


- 


5,500 00 


4,013 55 


18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 


Worcester Free Loan Association i . . . 

Worcester Garden City, Inc 

Worcester Girls' Club House Corporation . 
Worcester Hahnemann Hospital .... 
Worcester Ladies Chebra Kadishah i . 
Worcester Social Settlement Society . 


44,3S1 81 
145,540 00 

2,300 00 


7,000 00 
1,900 00 


1,567 50 
1,811 68 
3,250 00 

174 53 


774 6fl 
59,833 30 


24 


Worcester Society for District Nursing 


96,594 92 


_ 


41,015 34 


13,578 45 


25 
26 
27 


Worcester Swedish Charitable Association . 
Young Men's Christian Association . 
Young Women's Christian Association 


19,501 75 
867,527 21 
235,333 55 


325,000 00 


1,932 50 
85,387 93 
30,588 25 


82,559 53 
52,519 74 


28 


Y.\RMOUTH. 

Friday Club 


7,000 00 


- 


250 00 


890 87 


29 
30 
31 
32 


HEADQr.\RTERS OUTSIDE OF COMMONWEALTH. 

American Baptist Foreign Mission Society 

American Peace Society 

Boys Club Federation, Inc. .... 
Palou Reconstruction Union, Thei 


11,516,796 58 
632 98 


- 


1,264,371 72 

5,389 66 

18,266 65 


36,877 49 
876 37 




$162,388,225 23 


83,856,377 09 


$10,176,783 68 


$14,973,235 95 



1 No report. 



Part IL] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 

Charitable Corporations — Concluded. 



Ill 



Interest, 
Dividends, 

Annuities 
and Rentals 


Legacies 
specifically 
restricted 
to Capital 


Unrestricted 
Legacies 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 

Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 

Number 

aided 


Total 

Number 

Free 


Number 

of 

Families 

aided 




$235 23 
2,256 42 
41,044 54 


- 


$286 47 

6,738 51 

15,200 00 


$35,178 92 

6,602 64 

217,626 53 


$3,852 12 
2,419 90 


42 

8 

166 


186 

27 

9,562 

1 1 


75 

956 

1 ■ 


7 


1 
2 
3 


- 


- 


- 


351 57 


- 


- 


- 


4 


8,161 04 


$52,957 27 


- 


51,369 79 


12,406 70 


36 


^ 137 


137 


- 


5 
6 

7 
8 
9 


6 61 
14 53 


- 


_ 
4,489 42 


1,964 30 
43,014 90 
138,325 49 


8,796 35 


22 
110 


13 

320 
4,116 


21 
106 


~ 


252 50 
2,274 78 


- 
11,875 00 


- 


1,865 77 
12,452 18 


240 00 
5,529 48 


1 
10 


479 
/ 102 
1 559 


479 
} 189 


- 


10 
11 


3,055 33 

10,069 18 

473 68 


5,412 22 

1,475 00 

12,300 00 


- 


41,622 13 

49,504 00 

3,179 88 


8,957 60 
7,943 23 
2,316 64 


30 

7 
1 


4,656 

248 
42 


76 
1 2,190 


212 


13 
14 
15 


64 49 


- 


- 


7,906 14 


3,057 80 


5 


\ 3,000 


1 


16 


2,763 57 


6,500 00 


- 


12,069 35 


1,109 16 


2 


j 162 

1 206 


} - 


- 


17 


1,335 69 
422 50 


7,500 00 


2,000 00 


2,050 52 
2,065 02 
72,248 69 


1,346 15 
960 00 


1 

1 

24 


900 
250 
855 


900 

250 

10 


" 


18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 


144 00 


_ 


_ 


430 75 


68 60 


2 


500 


500 


_ 


5,898 25 


4,469 47 


- 


62,781 65 


45,732 27 


38 


f 462 
1 31,272 


} 24,977 


- 


24 


106 08 

478 80 

20,155 01 


- 


1,000 00 
1,000 00 


2,850 89 
204,575 67 
103,917 95 


83,160 83 
8,095 64 


76 
13 


^ "75 

174,691 

3,235 


170,921 


10 


25 
26 

27 


339 00 


- 


- 


1,520 23 


- 


- 


{ .r 


) - 


- 


28 


472,235 86 
1,377 24 


673 00 


169,672 89 
1,500 00 


2,058,352 37 
46,982 39 
18,899 88 


626,987 12 
10,531 08 
12,567 00 


2 
3 


12 


- 


- 


29 
30 
31 


- 


- 


- 


~ 


~ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


32 


$5,673,613 32 


$1,855,613 89 


$1,599,285 54 


$32,101,010 88 


$5,914,901 20 


14,665 


2,053,503 


692,189 


32,455 





2 Organizations aided. 



112 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 



Part III. 



THE CITY AND TOWN ALMSHOUSES 

AND 

STATISTICS OF POOR RELIEF. 



Francis Bardwell, Inspector of Almshouses. 



Laws relating to Almshouses. 

For the information of overseers of the poor, masters of ahnshouses and others 
concerned, certain laws relating to almshouses are here summarized. 

The Department of Public Welfare is required to visit annually all city and town 
almshouses, and to include in its annual report a statement of their condition 
and management, with its suggestions and recommendations relative thereto. 
(General Laws, chap. 121, sect. 7.) 

The master of every almshouse must keep a register, in a form prescribed by 
the Department of Public Welfare, of the names of the persons received or com- 
mitted, the cities or towns to which they belong, and the dates of their reception 
and discharge. (General Laws, chap. 47, sect. 17.) 

Every inmate of an almshouse able to work shall be kept diligently employed 
in labor. If he is idle and does not perform such reasonable task as is assigned, or 
if he is stubborn and disorderlj'-, he shall be punished according to the orders and 
regulations established by the directors. (General Laws, chap. 117, sects. 21 and 
22; chap. 47, sect. 21. See also opinion of Attorney-General given to State Board 
of Charity November 21, 1904.) 

The only children who can be lawfully supported in a city or town almshouse 
for a period of more than two months are: (1) those who are so defective in body 
or mind as to make their retention in an ahnshouse desirable; (2) those who are 
under two years of age; (3) those who are under three years of age, with mothers 
who are almshouse inmates and suitable persons to aid in taking care of them. In 
cases of failure of overseers of the poor to remove children illegally in almshouses, 
the Department of PubHc Welfare is required to remove them and provide for 
them otherwise, at the expense of the city or town concerned. (General Laws, 
chap. 117, sects. 36-38.) 

Provision is made that tramps and vagrants, as well as criminals, shall be con- 
fined in separate and distinct quarters in all almshouses, and shall not be permitted 
to associate or communicate with pauper inmates. Almshouse officials knowingly 
violating this law are liable to be punished by a fine of not more than $300, or by 
imprisonment for not more than six months, or by both such fine and imprison- 
ment. (General Laws, chap. 47, sect. 25.) It should also be noted that tramps 
and vagrants, if physically able, shall perform labor of some kind, and shall be 
lodged under conditions prescribed by the State Department of Health. (General 
Laws, chap. 117, sect. 20.) 



Part III.] ALMSHOUSES. . 113 

The Department of Public Welfare is authorized to advise with and assist over- 
seers of the poor in preparation of plans for almshouse buildings. (General Laws, 
chap. 121, sect. 38.) 

Inspection of Almshouses. 

During the year the Department's Inspector has visited every almshouse once. 
Fifteen have been visited twice, 7 three times, and 1 four times. The inspector 
has had conferences with overseers of the poor, mayors of cities, members of build- 
ing committees, and members of boards of town finance on matters pertaining to 
almshouse conditions or construction. There are in Massachusetts 141 alms- 
houses and at time of visitation there were 3,795 inmates. 

New Almshouses. 

The almshouse at Andover will be ready for occupancy late in the winter. This 
building embraces novel features in its construction and any one interested in an 
up to date town home will find it well worth while to make a visit at Andover. 
The Marlborough house is fast nearing completion. It is well planned and situ- 
ated about a mile from the center of the city on a most sightly location. At Marsh- 
field the new house will probably be completed in May. This building is on the 
town land directly opposite the old house. Plans have been drawn for a new 
house at Weymouth which will be built on the town farm land. 

Almshouses closed. 

The almshouses at Ashfield, Brimfield, Carlisle, and Swansea have been closed, 
there having been no inmates for several years. The almshouse at Canton has 
also been closed and the property is to be disposed of. 

Recommendations made. 

It is the duty of the Department's Inspector to take up all matters of minor 
importance touching upon the general welfare and comfort of the almshouse 
inmates and, when advisable, to consult directly with overseers of the poor or 
their representatives. In addition to these personal suggestions the Department 
has made the following recommendations to the various boards of overseers. 

Cambridge, that children now remaining beyond the limit allowed by law be 
placed elsewhere. 

Easthampton, that a mother with children be'suitably placed. 

Lawrence, that the almshouse hospital receive immediate consideration and 
that trained graduate nurses be provided, or that a new city hospital more suited 
to the city's needs be erected. 

Marblehead, that the house be screened. 

Marlborough, that a patient suffering from tuberculosis be placed in a proper 
hospital. 

Mattapoisett, that an elderly patient suffering from cancer be sent to a hospital. 

New Bedford, that general and extensive improvements be undertaken unless 
the city decides to dispose of present building and build a new institution. 

North Brookfield, that electric lights should be installed if possible. 

Oxford, that the water supply be improved. 

Pembroke, that a boy, who has been placed but who still returns to the alms- 
house, be placed, if possible, in a suitable family. 

Quincy, that strips of linoleum or rubber be provided for the corridors. 

Westfield, that extensive repairs to present building be made or that a new 
building be erected. 



114 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. I). 17. 



Almshouse Visitors. 

The almshouse visitors' arc local residents, giviuj;- their services, under the Com- 
missioner's appointment. Those now in office are: Adams, Mrs. W. C. Plunkett; 
Amesbury, Mrs. Georoe W. Crowther; Andover, Mrs. Amy F. Trow; Athol, Miss 
Hattie ^1. French; Beverly, ^liss Laura G. Woodbury; Boston, Miss Frances G. 
Curtis and Aliss Theresa M. Lally; Canton, Miss Alary C. Rogers; Cha^'lton, 
Mrs. Edgar W. Preble; Concord, Mrs. H. B. Hosmer; Dennis, Miss Ellen H. Under- 
wood; Easthampton, Mrs. Susie Boswortli Munn; Easton, Mrs. Myrtie A. Spooner; 
Fairhaven, Miss Georgia E. Fairfield; Fall River, Mrs. Joseph A. Barry, Mrs. J. 
Thayer Lincoln, Mrs. Francis S. Root, JMrs. Michael F. Sullivan and Mrs. Charles 
H. Warner; Falmouth, Mrs. Alfred F. Kelley; Fitchburg, Mrs. Alvah Crocker; 
Gardner, Mrs. Elbridge R. Jackson; Gloucester, Mrs. J. E. Anderson; Greenfield, 
Mrs. Henry F. Xash; Lancaster, Miss Mary Belle Bailey; Lawrence, Mrs. Lewis 
A. Foye; Lee, INIrs. James Rice and Mrs. H. W. Stevens; Lexington, Mrs. John 
S. Spaulding; Lynn, Airs. A. K. Bailey; Maiden, Mrs. Harvey L. Boutwell; Man- 
chester, Mrs. Grace L. Porter; Marlborough, Mrs. L. H. Tourtellotte; Mattapoi- 
sett. Miss Charlotte Parsons; Medford, Mrs. Louise G. DeLong; Milton, Mrs. 
Mary H. Sias; Monson, Mrs. Minnie A. Clifford; Montague, Mrs. Richard R. 
Lyman; Nantucket, Miss Ella F. Sylvia and Mrs. Josephine S. Brooks; Natick, 
Airs. James E. White: Newburj-port, Miss Fanny C. Stone and Mrs. Frederick Tigh; 
North Adams, Airs. Lida A. Kimball; Northampton, Miss Clara C. Allen; North 
Attleborough, Airs. Edwin R. Crossley; Peabody, Airs. F. C. Merrill; Pepperell, 
Airs. Charles D. Hutchinson; Pl3^mouth, Miss Helen Russell; Provincetown, Mrs. 
Ruth S. Snow; Randolph, Airs. Daniel F. Flynn; Somerville, Mrs. Alay Knight 
Southwell; Southbridge, Aliss Alargaret G. Butler; Springfield, Airs. Julia Judd; 
Taunton, Aliss Alarie H. Alanseau; Waltham, Airs. Pryor Fulton; Warren, Airs. 
Edna DeLand; Westborough, Airs. Andrew B. Adams; West Brookfield, Airs. Eli 
Converse; East Bridgewater, Airs. Anna S. LeLacheur; West Newbury, Aliss 
Emily A. Bailey; Winchendon, Airs. Frank B. Spalter; Worcester, Aliss Nellie 
E. Barrett, Airs. Charles F. Darling and Airs. Harry A. Wilber. 

Reports from Almshouses. 

Tabulated information relating to the various almshouses follows. The Charl- 
ton Almshouse is managed by an association kno\vn as the Charlton Poor Farm 
Association and is used in common by the towns of Ashburnham, Auburn, 
Boylston, Brookfield, Charlton, East Brookfield, Hardwick, Holden, Holland, 
Hubbardston, Leicester, Alillburv, Oakham, Paxton, Princeton, Rutland, Sterling 
and Westminster. The total annual cost was S9,540.52; net, $5,589.38. The 
several towns comprising the association paid for their share of the expense as 
given in the following table. 



Part III.] 



ALMSHOUSES. 



115 





^ 


— 1 1 1 1 1 1 le^i 1 i^ios-i 1 1 — 1 1 1 1 1— (Ml 1— — — 1 — 1 1 i-Hicj 




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1 

1 










"Sin 


>-tot^ 1 rcio icoc^u-iox — ■'i'c; i <Morc i c;Mt^'*c;t^c;c;Tj>~:c;-<j.-^oc» Icet^ — 
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ll 


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$14,000 00 

9,050 00 

29,440 50 

10,500 00 
14,415 75 

12,000 00 
10,000 00 

9,100 00 
13,000 00 
12,090 48 
34,000 00 

7,500 00 

22,490 00 

0,500 00 

53,000 00 

9,000 00 
3,800 00 
110,000 00 
10,000 00 
10,308 25 
30,000 00 
18,000 00 
18,000 00 
15,000 00 
25,000 00 
19,200 00 
2,000 00 
8,442 92 
4,700 00 
10,750 00 

15,000 00 
0,535 00 
10,000 00 




Cul- 
tivated 
Land 

(Acres) 


§ :^ 1 1 g^ ^ 1 £2 ^5 53:5:^^5^ '°°g^ ' 'S — t~^S-— ^^J'l'^'g ip; 't2S2 




^1 


Sf- ' 5§ • J^Sgl^^ls ' " = l ' "^S-i^2^§S{22§g«S ' 1^- ! 











Frank G. Warren 
Dudley (I. Currier 
Mrs. Fred A. Swanton 
C^harlton Aaaociation . 
Joseph McFadden 
Nelson Hagar 
Charlton Association . 
James F. Carter . 
Lewis II. Leekio . 
lOdward A. Ackerman 
CharU>8 M. Rhodes . 
Williarn H. llatfiehl . 
Walter Farnham 
Harry Tolman . 
Joseph J. Ryan . 
Charlton Association . 
James T. Christian 
I'rank P. Chadwick . 
Mrs. .\melia Brown . 
Charlton Association . 
Mrs. Mary B. Perkins 
Willard C. Aste . 
John T. Shea 
Carl M. Wheeler . 
Ross S. SpauldinR 
Timothy J. Donovan 
John Martin 
Henry R. Nickerson . 
Peter C. Peterson 
Thomas W. Barnes 
Benjamin Turner 
Leander C. Baker 
.Mbert K. Dixson 
Herbert Packard 
lOugene S. Dodge 
Charlton Association . 
I rederick L. I'rost 
Charles Scott 
John J. Kldridgc 




6 


1 . 




Adams 

Amesbury . 

Andover 

Ashburnham 

Athol 

Attleboro . 

Auburn 

Ayer . 

Barnstable 

Barro . 

Belchertown 

liellingham 

Beverly 

Billerica . 

Boston 

Boylston . 

Braintreo . 

Bridgewater 

iirockton . 

Brookheld . 

Brooklino . 

Bu(;kland . 

Cambridge 

C Charlton 

Chelmsford 

Chieopee . 

Clinton 

( 'ohasset 

Concord 

Dartmouth 

Dedham . 

Dennis 

Douglaa 

Duxbury . 

Kast Bridgewater 

Kast Brookfield . 

Kastliampton 

I']aston 

I'airhaven . 



IIG 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17 



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Part III. 



ALMSHOUSES. 



117 



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Part III.] STAT.STICS OF POOR RELIEF. 119 



STATISTICS OF POOR RELIEF. 



Numbers Relieved. 

The following information covers public relief, whether rendered in institu- 
tions or outside, and aid rendered by all public agencies, whether State or local. 

The tables given below are arranged to show numbers relieved and their analysis 
by age, sex and nativity. The tabulations are concluded by figures for cost of all 
relief. 

Table I shows the number supported or relieved by the several cities and towns 
during the year beginning April 1, 1921, and ending March 31, 1922. All persons 
are included, regardless of settlement. The total number receiving aid in any 
form, exclusive of vagrants and wayfarers, was 117,587. Of this number, 11,574 
were aided in institutions, and 106,013 — the remainder — outside, either in pri- 
vate families or in their own homes. Of the persons aided in institutions, 
7,444 were relieved in the various city and town almshouses, leaving 4,130 who 
were cared for in other institutions. Of the outside aid, 1,670 cases were aided in 
private families other than their own, while 104,343 were reported as having been 
aided in their own homes. This last figure thus comprises practically all city and 
town aid usually known as local public outdoor relief, including that under Chapter 
118 of the General Laws. 

There is an increase of 32 per cent over the preceding year in the number aided 
in institutions, and an increase of 24.8 per cent in the number aided outside. 

Table II supplies the same data for persons aided or relieved by the State as are 
shown in Table I for local relief. In addition to aid rendered directly by the State, 
this table includes also all those cases included in Table I, in which the relief has 
been rendered by cities and towns in the first instance and reimbursed by the 
State as required by law. This table shows 35,264 persons aided by the State. 
Of this number, the aid in 31,415 cases was first rendered by the several cities and 
towns. The remaining 3,849 cases were aided by the State: 3,247 of them at the 
State Infirmary; 505 in the almshouse ward at the State Farm; and 97 at the 
Massachusetts Hospital School. 

Table III affords a rapid glance at the movement of population in the dependent 
group during the year under analysis. Thus it appears that 56,385 cases repre- 
sented approximately the total number of persons receiving aid April 1, 1921. 
About 76 per cent of these were receiving relief locally. During the year 65,051 
new cases were admitted to relief; 33.9 per cent of this figure were aided either 
directly or through reimbursement by the State. The persons who passed out of 
care during that same period numbered 60,572, viz., city and town cases, 40,848; 
State cases, 19,724. Those in this total released by death numbered 1,892, and 
1,563 were persons transferred. At the close of the year, therefore, the cities and 
towns had 45,324 persons in receipt of relief, and the State had 15,540, making a 
total of 60,864. 

Table IV begins classification of the whole number of persons aided, and shows 
the analysis by color, nativity and sex. Of the 121,436 persons so aided, 58,219 
were males and 63,217 were females. The colored races furnished only 1.7 per 
cent, or 2,173 of the whole number. The native-born whites — 84,878 — still 
number more than double the foreign born of the white races, the 33,860 of this 



12(1 DEPARTMENT OE PUBLIC V elEARE. [P. 1). 17. 

latter pjroup representing a proportionate increase of 28 per cent over last j'ear. 
The females of the total native born outnumber the males by 3 per cent, while 
of the total foreign born, the females outnumber the males by 24 per cent. 

Table \' gives a further interesting analysis of the native-born persons aided 
during the year classified by parent nativity. 

The parents of 25,273 were both native; 44,756 were children of foreign-born 
parents; 14,425 were of parents one of whom was foreign born or unknown; while 
the nativity of parents in 2,319 cases remained unascertained. It appears from 
this table, therefore, that of the 121,436 persons receiving aid in Massachusetts in 
the year ending ^larch 31, 1922, there were at least 78,875 who were either foreign 
born or were of the first generation in our citizenship. 

By Table VI it appears that of the 121,436 cases aided, 15,100 were under five; 
57,497 were under fifteen; 67,554, or 55.6 per cent, including the above, were under 
twenty; 41,788, or 34.4 per cent, were between twenty and sixty; 10,838, or 9 
per cent, were over that age. The ages of 1,256 were unknown. 

Among the poor persons relieved are always a considerable number of mental 
defectives who for one reason or another have not been committed and are there- 
fore not cared for in the special institutions, such as the asylums for the insane, 
maintained for that purpose. In regard to this class it is to be noted further that, 
since no court has passed upon their mental condition, their classification here is 
made only because, in the opinion of the respective authorities making the returns, 
there is no doubt of their defect. Table ^'II affords a rough classification into three 
groups, according to the nature of the defect, and a division by sex. The total 
number thus cared for was 338, namely, 191 males and 147 females. Two hun- 
dred seventy-five of these cases were relieved by the cities and towns; the remain- 
ing 63 of the number, having no settlement, were aided at the expense of the State. 
One hundred thirty-five of the whole number were classed as ''insane," mostly 
the senile and mildh' insane to be found in the almshouses. This total includes 
84 males and 51 females. One hundred thirty-nine were called "idiotic," namely, 
70 males and 69 females. The "epileptics" totaled 64, of whom 37 were males 
and 27 were females. 

Table VIII calls attention more pointedly to the sex and the nature of discharge 
from relief of those persons who passed out of aid during the year. Of the 60,572 
cases so dismissed, 30,500 were males and 30,072 were females. Forty-eight per 
cent, or 29,456, were released to the care of relatives or friends. In this group the 
females preponderated slightly. About 2^ per cent, or 1,563, of the whole number 
were transferred to other institutions, while 45.6 per cent of the aggregate were 
discharged without relatives or friends or other authorities agreeing to look after 
them. The great majority in this last group were persons assisted through illness, 
after which they became self-supporting again. 

As appears from Table IX the foreign born who were receiving public relief dur- 
ing the year numbered 34,119, or 28 per cent of the entire number of persons aided. 
This percentage is less than the proportion of foreign born in the population gen- 
erallv (31.4 per cent) bv 3.4 per cent. Canada furnished 6,855 of this number; 
England and Wales, 1,725; Germany, 232; Ireland, 5,946; Italy, 6,148; Russia 
and Poland, 3,747; Scandinavia, 515; and Scotland, 451; all other countries, 
8,500. 

Table X shows the percentage of the various classes aided to the whole number 
relieved. Thus of the 121,436 persons relieved, 70.96 per cent were settled cases, 
receiving their assistance out of local taxes; 29.04 per cent were unsettled, and, 
though relieved by the respective cities and towns in the first instance in a major- 
ity of cases, were ultimately aided out, of the State tax. As to the place in which 
relief was given, 12.7 per cent of the total were aided in institutions, namely, 6.13 
per cent in almshouses; 3.17 per cent in State institutions; and 3.4 per cent in 
other institutions, mostly under private management. Outdoor relief, designated 
as aid "outside," was given in 87.3 per cent of all the cases. Most of these, namely, 
85.92 per cent, were relieved in their own homes. Aid was given in private families 
other than the recipient's own — mostly boarded cases — in 1.38 per cent instances. 



Part III.] STATISTICS OF POOR RELIEF. 121 

Percentages of age show that 56.59 per cent were minors, 33.44 per cent were 
between the ages of twenty-one and sixty, and 8.92 per cent were sixty or over. 
The ages of 1.03 per cent were unknown. Sexes differ slightly, males rating 47.94 
and females 52.06 per cent. 

The number of colored persons was very small, totaling only 1.79 per cent. 

By reason of thoroughgoing classification in the care of defectives, the percentage 
of those mentally deficient persons still cared for as poor-relief cases is exceedingly 
small, and tends alwa3^s to decrease. The mental condition of all the cases aided 
shows, on analysis, that 99.72 per cent were sane, .11 per cent were insane, .12 
per cent were idiotic, and .05 per cent were epileptic. The proportion of sane per- 
sons in last j^ear's returns was 99.5 per cent. 

It is further of interest to view at a glance the numerical relationship to the 
whole population of the persons relieved at public expense as appears in Table XI, 
which exhibits the number of each class in every thousand of the population of 
the State on a basis of the census of 1920. Thus it is shown that in each thousand 
of the population there were 31.52 indigent persons relieved at public expense. 
Of these, 15.11 were males and 16.41 were females. The native born numbered 
22.52 in the thous^d; foreign born, 8.86; native born of foreign parentage, 11.62; 
and those of unknown nativity, .14. The proportion of vagrants reported was 
5.97 in the thousand. 

Cost of Poor Relief. 

The funds laid out by the several cities and towns for all poor relief within their 
respective fiscal j^ears are shown in Table XII. The aggregate is classified as 
^'ordinary," or maintenance, and ''extraordinary," or special. Together with the 
ordinary' outlays are shown the receipts on account of maintenance, and the dif- 
ference, set out under ''net ordinary expenditures." The ordinary outlay is clas- 
sified as expenses in institutions and outside. This subdivision follows the classi- 
fications in Table I regarding the nature and the place of aid. The grand totals 
in Table XII show that an aggregate of $8,916,450.72 was laid out by the several 
cities and towns. Of this sum, 88,780,790.01 was ordinary outlay, or maintenance; 
the remainder, or $135,660.71, was expended for sundry improvements, all of it 
at the city and town almshouses. Of the mone}^ laid out for maintenance, 
$2,032,309.14 was expended for almshouse care, and $850,393.21 for relief in other 
institutions. Care in private families took $342,349.28, and relief in the recipients' 
own homes, i.e., outdoor poor reUef, totaled $5,095,921.45. The cost of admin- 
istration, including salary and office expenses of the overseers, but exclusive of 
institution administration, came to $459,816.93. The total receipts on account 
of ordinarv expenditures were $2,273,789.17, — • classified as receipts on account of 
institutions, $469,834.74, and all other, $1,803,954.43. This latter portion of the 
receipts is made up mostly of reimbursements by cities and towns ultimately 
liable, and from the State treasur}- in unsettled cases. Subtracting receipts leaves 
•$6,507,000.84 as the net ordinary outlay. 

In Table XIII the analysis shown for cities and towns by Table XII is carried 
out for cases aided out of the State funds. Of the $2,106,732.68 expended for this 
purpose, $2,007,716.33 was on account of ordinary expenditures, laid out as fol- 
lows :^ at the State Infirmary, $386,519.54; at the State Farm, $63,520.88; at the 
Hospital School, $32,300.73; and all other expenditures, outside of institutions, 
:$1, 525,375. 18. Extraordinary expenditures totaled $99,016.35, — all expended 
for special improvements at the several institutions just enumerated. Inasmuch 
as it is impossible to trace institution expenditures to the separate individuals 
receiving the aid, the figures set out under the State tables of cost are arrived at 
by taking from total expenditures that proportion which the number relieved bears 
to the total inmate population of the institution. 

In Table XIV State and local outlays are added, showing that of the $8,749,394.23 
expended for public poor relief, $8,514,717.17 was for ordinarv outlavs, of which 
$2,800,246.87 went for institutional relief and $5,714,470.30' was for relief out- 
side. The total of extraordinary expenditures was $234,677.06. 



122 



DEPART.MEXT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 



STATISTICS OF POOR RELIEF. 



Table I. — X umber of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during the Year ending 

March 31, 19^^li. 













Aggre- 


In 


[XSTITUTIOXS 


Outside 


CITIES AND 














TOWNS 


gate 




In Alms- 
houses 


In Other 




In Pri- 


In their 






Total 


Insti- 


Total 


vate 


Own 








tutions 




Families 


Homes 


Abington 


149 


1 




1 


148 


8 


140 


Acton . 










15 


1 


_ 


1 


14 


1 


13 


Acushnet 










107 


6 


- 


6 


101 


3 


98 


Adams 










140 


17 


12 


5 


123 


8 


115 


Agawam 










32 


5 


- 


5 


27 


- 


27 


Alford . 












_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


_ 


_ 


Ainesbury . 










334 


22 


22 


- 


312 


- 


312 


Amherst 










31 


7 


- 


7 


24 


7 


17 


Andover 










112 


16 


12 


4 


96 


- 


96 


Arlington 










125 


1 


- 


1 


124 


12 


112 


Ashburnham 


. 








48 


1 


- 


1 


47 


- 


47 


Ashbv . 










8 


1 


_ 


1 


7 


_ 


7 


Ashfield 










11 




- 




11 


- 


11 


Ashland 










59 


4 


_ 


4 


55 


2 


53 


At hoi . 










346 


18 


15 


3 


328 


2 


326 


Attleboro 










554 


32 


21 


11 


522 


31 


491 


Auburn 










78 


2 




2 


. 76 




76 


Avon . 










23 




- 


- 


23 


- 


23 


Aver 










12 


9 


6 


3 


3 


- 


3 


Barnstable 










175 


18 


16 


2 


157 


12 


145 


Barre . 










22 


9 


9 




13 


2 


11 


Becket 










8 


1 




1 


7 


_ 


7 


Bedford 










5 




_ 




5 


1 


4 


Belchertown 








13 


3 


2 


1 


10 


- 


10 


Bellingham 








36 


9 


9 




27 


1 


26 


Belmont 








40 


7 




7 


33 


- 


33 


Berkley 










5 




- 


- 


5 


- 


5 


Berlin . 










17 


6 


_ 


6 


11 


3 


8 


Bernardston 














_ 










Beverly 










2,192 


81 


63 


18 


2,111 


- 


2,111 


Billerica 










40 


4 


4 


- 


36 


3 


33 


Blackstone 










24 




- 


- 


24 


- 


24 


Blandford 










3 


_ 


_ 


- 


3 


1 


2 


Bolton 










18 


- 


- 


- 


18 


1 


17 


Boston 










16,879 


3,018 


1,684 


1,334 


13,861 


- 


13,861 


Bourne 










48 


_ 


_ 


— 


48 


5 


43 


Box borough 












- 


- 


- 




- 


- 


Box ford 










_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Boylston 










n 


4 


- 


4 


7 


2 


5 


Braintree 










312 


32 


24 


8 


280 


19 


261 


Brewster 










13 


- 


- 


- 


13 


3 


10 


Bridgewater 










150 


13 


9 


4 


137 


1 


136 


Brim field 










2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


Brockton 










2,368 


134 


102 


32 


2,234 


40 


2,194 


Brookfield 










25 


2 


- 


2 


23 


1 


22 


Brookline 










384 


43 


21 


22 


341 


11 


330 


Buckland 










10 


3 


2 


1 


7 


- 


7 


Burlington 










17 


1 


- 


1 


16 


1 


15 


Cambridge 










3,445 


197 


159 


38 


3,248 


27 


3,221 


Canton 










139 


8 


8 


- 


131 


10 


121 


Carlisle 










9 


2 


2 


- 


7 


1 


6 


Carver 










28 


_ 


- 


- 


28 


4 


24 


Charlemont 










1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


Charlton 










15 


1 


1 


- 


14 


- 


14 


Chatham 










9 


2 


_ 


2 


7 


5 


2 


Chelmsford 










58 


17 


9 


8 


41 


1 


40 


Chelsea 










2,096 


76 


- 


76 


2,020 


16 


2,004 


Cheshire 










8 


1 


- 


1 


7 


2 


5 


Chester 










17 


- 


- 


- 


17 


- 


17 


Chesterfield 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Chicopee 










1,676 


107 


75 


32 


1,569 


- 


1,569 


Chilmark 










2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


- 


Clarksburg 










16 


- 


- 


- 


16 


' 


15 



Part III.] 



STATISTICS OF POOR RELIEF. 



123 



NUMBER OF POOR PERSONS SUPPORTED OR RELIEVED. 



Table I. 



Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during the Year ending 
March 31, 1922 — Continued. 











Aggre- 


In 


Institutions 


Outside 


CITIES AND 














TOWNS 


gate 




In Alms- 
houses 


In Other 




In Pri- 


In their 






Total 


Insti- 


Total 


vate 


Ov.n 








tutions 




Families 


Homes 


Clinton 


257 


24 


22 


2 


233 


2 


231 


Cohasset . 








76 


8 


8 




68 


1 


67 


Colrain 








7 






_ 


7 


3 


4 


Concord 








56 


4 


4 


_ 


52 


6 


46 


Conway 








13 






_ 


13 


2 


11 


Cummington 








9 


2 


1 


1 


7 


1 


6 


Dalton 








75 


4 


_ 


4 


71 


6 


65 


Dana . ... 








3 


2 


_ 


2 


1 


1 


_ 


Danvers 








297 


4 


_ 


4 


293 


20 


273 


Dartmouth . 








427 


15 


10 


5 


412 


16 


396 


Dedham 








286 


19 


12 


7 


267 


11 


256 


Deerfield . 








26 








26 


1 


25 


Dennis 








48 


6 


4 


2 


42 


2 


40 


Dighton 








37 








37 


10 


27 


Douglas 








68 


6 


4 


2 


62 


22 


40 


Dover . 








4 


1 


_ 


1 


3 


_ 


3 


Dracut 








131 


5 


_ 


5 


126 


1 


125 


Dudley 








188 


4 


_ 


4 


184 


10 


174 


Dunstable . 








1 




_ 




1 


1 




Duxbury 








36 


6 


6 


_ 


30 


4 


26 


East Bridgewater 








18 


1 




1 


17 




17 


East Brookfield . 








49 


5 


5 




44 


_ 


44 


East Longmeadow 








72 






_ 


72 


_ 


72 


Eastham 








7 


1 


_ 


1 


6 


_ 


6 


Easthampton 








348 


42 


18 


24 


306 


7 


299 


Easton 








92 


4 


3 


1 


88 


2 


86 


Edgartown . 








17 


1 




1 


16 


3 


13 


Egremont . 








3 




_ 




3 


2 


1 


Enfield 








2 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2 


2 


- 


Erving 








45 


_ 


_ 


_ 


46 


1 


44 


Essex . 








15 


6 


_ 


6 


9 


1 


8 


Everett 








1,069 


32 


_ 


32 


1,037 


21 


1,016 


Fairhaven . 








515 


11 


9 


2 


504 


1 


503 


Fall River . 








6,651 


612 


384 


228 


6,039 


90 


5,S49 


Falmouth . 








62 


6 


6 




56 


1 


55 


Fitchburg . 








2,753 


108 


74 


34 


2,645 


8 


2,637 


Florida 








8 


1 


_ 


1 


7 


_ 


7 


Foxborough 








45 


3 


_ 


3 


42 


4 


38 


Framingham 








401 


33 


_ 


33 


368 


4 


364 


Franklin 








62 




_ 




62 




62 


Freetown 








19 


_ 


_ 


_ 


19 


_ 


19 


Gardner 








876 


38 


23 


15 


838 


16 


822 


Gay Head . 




















- 


Georgetown 








51 


8 


4 


4 


43 


1 


42 


Gill 








3 








3 


1 


2 


Gloucester . 








1,360 


95 


95 


- 


1,265 




1.265 


Goshen 








13 


2 




2 


11 


_ 


11 


Gosnold 












_ 






_ 




Grafton . . 








136 


11 


11 


_ 


125 


5 


120 


Gran by 








1 






_ 


1 


1 




Granville 








4 


1 


_ 


1 


3 




3 


Great Barrington 








87 


5 


_ 


5 


82 


7 


75 


Greenfield . 








416 


38 


15 


23 


378 


4 


374 


Greenwich . 








1 


1 




1 






_ 


Groton 








13 


5 


3 


2 


8 


1 


7 


Groveland . 








43 


1 


1 




42 


6 


36 


Hadley 








25 


2 




2 


23 


1 


22 


Halifax 








4 




_ 




4 


2 





Hamilton . 








35 


4 


_ 


4 


31 


3 


28 


Hampden . 








4 


1 


_ 


1 


3 


1 


2 


Hancock 








1- 




_ 








1 


Hanover 








74 


9 


8 


1 


65 


6 


59 


Hanson 








26 


6 


6 




20 




20 


Hardwick . 








34 


2 




2 


32 


2 


30 



124 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC AYELFARE. 



STATISTICS OF POOR RELIEF. 



Table I, 



Xufuln-r of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during the Year ending 
Morch 31, 10.32 — Continued. 











Aggre- 


In Institutions 


Outside 


CITIES AND 














TOWNS 


gate 




In Alms- 
houses 


In Other 




In Pri- 


In their 






Total 


Insti- 


Total 


vate 


Own 








tutions 




Families 


Homes 


Harvard 


1 


1 ' 


1 




_ 


_ 




Harwich 








56 


9 


8 


1 


47 


- 


47 


Hatfield 








14 


3 




3 


11 


- 


11 


Haverhill . 








3,596 


794 


138 


656 


2,802 


1 


2,801 


Hawley 








6 


2 


_ 


2 


•1 


2 


2 


Heath . 








4 




_ 




4 


~- 


4 


Hingham 








111 


15 


14 


1 


96 


2 


94 


Hinsdale 








24 








24 


3 


21 


HoH^rook . 








50 


1 


_ 


1 


49 


2 


•47 


Holden 








37 


11 


_ 


11 


26 


_ 


26 


Holland 












_ 




_ 


_ 




Holliston 








55 


14 


9 


5 


41 


- 


41 


Holyoke 








2,684 


359 


272 


87 


2,325 


3 


2,322 


Hopedale 








15 


1 


- 


1 


14 


3 


11 


Hopkinton . 
Hubbardston 








12 


2 


_ 


2 


10 


_ 


10 








4 


3 


_ 


3 


1 


_ 


1 


Hudson 








156 


20 


15 


5 


136 


1 


130 


Hull . 








67 


4 




4 


63 


4 


59 


Huntington 








31 


1 


_ 


1 


30 


7 


23 


Ipswich 








185 


10 


10 


- 


175 


11 


104 


Kingston 








40 


- 


- 


- 


40 


5 


35 


Lakeville . 








6 


_ 




_ 


6 


- 


6 


Lancaster 








27 


5 


4 


1 


22 


- 


22 


Lanes borough 








10 




- 


- 


10 


2 


8 


LawTence 








2,082 


460 


438 


22 


1,622 


25 


1,597 


Lee . 








22 


7 


5 


2 


15 


_ 


15 


Leicester 








60 


4 


1 


3 


56 


- 


56 


Lenox . 








38 


1 




1 


37 


6 


31 


Leominster . 








597 


17 


15 


2 


580 


14 


566 


Leveret t 








11 


1 




1 


10 


3 


7 


Lexington . 








179 


13 


4 


9 


166 


13 


153 


Leyden 








2 




- 




2 


- 


2 


Lincoln 








4 


1 


1 


- 


3 


- 


3 


Littleton 








16 


1 




1 


15 


2 


13 


Longmeadow 








6 


4 


_ 


4 


2 


- 


2 


Lowell . 








6,048 


899 


806 


93 


5,149 


- 


5,149 


Ludlow 








444 


3 


- 


3 


441 


6 


435 


Lunenburg . 








24 


8 


8 


- 


16 


- 


16 


Lynn . 








3,648 


170 


116 


54 


3,478 


20 


3,458 


Lynn field . 








7 


1 




1 


6 


_ 


6 


Maiden 








721 


84 


54 


30 


637 


3 


634 


Manchester . 








39 


7 


7 


_ 


32 


- 


32 


Mansfield . 








180 


8 


5 


3 


172 


13 


159 


Marblehead 








287 


31 


23 


8 


256 


4 


252 


Marion 








14 


2 




2 


12 


3 


9 


Marlborough 








294 


53 


42 


11 


241 


8 


233 


Marshfield . 








40 


14 


13 


1 


26 


- 


26 


Mashpce 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Matiapoisett 








28 


4 


4 


- 


24 


1 


23 


Mavnard 








74 


- 


- 


- 


74 


5 


69 


Medfield . 








11 


_ 


_ 


_ 


11 


2 


9 


Medford 








170 


26 


26 


_ 


144 


- 


144 


Medway 








114 


13 


12 


1 


101 


1 


100 


Melrose 








249 


7 




7 


242 


9 


233 


Mendon 








5 


1 


_ 


1 


4 


1 


3 


Merrimac 








40 


2 


- 


2 


38 


7 


31 


Methuen 








155 


10 


10 


_ 


145 


- 


145 


Middleborough 








143 


12 


10 


2 


131 


5 


126 


Middlefield . 








5 


_ 


- 


- 


5 


- 


5 


Middletou . 








4 


_ 


_ 


- 


4 


- 


4 


Milford 








360 


52 


51 


1 


308 


1 


307 


Millbury . 








381 


5 


1 


4 


376 


3 


373 


Miilis . 








14 


- 


- 


- 


14 ■ 


2 


12 


Millville 








32 


1 


_ 


1 


31 


1 


30 


Milton 








68 


8 


4 


4 


60 


1 


59 



Part III. 



STATISTICS OF POOR RELIEF. 



125 



NUMBER OF POOR PERSONS SUPPORTED OR RELIEVED. 



Table I. 



Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during the Year ending 
March 31, 1922 — Continued. 















Aggre- 


In Institutions 


Outside 


CITIES AND 














TOWNS 


gate 




In Alms- 
houses 


In Other 




In Pri- 


In their 






Total 


Insti- 


Total 


vate 


Own 








tutions 




Families 


Homes 


Monroe 


1 


_ 






1 


1 




Monson 










43 


14 


10 


4 


29 


4 


25 


Montague . • 










141 


8 


8 


- 


133 


- 


133 


Monterey 










5 


- 


- 


- 


5 


1 


4 


Montgomery 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


Mount Washington 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Nahant ». 








2 


2 


— 


2 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Nantucket . 








49 


26 


24 


2 


23 


1 


22 


Natick 








249 


29 


23 


6 


220 


3 


217 


Needham . 








144 


2 


- 


2 


142 


6 


136 


New Ashford 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 






New Bedford 








9,418 


388 


379 


9 


9,030 


29 


9,001 


New Braintree . 








2 


- 


- 


- 


2 




2 


New Marlborough 








5 


2 


1 


1 


3 


1 


2 


New Salem . 








26 


- 


- 


- 


26 


10 


16 


Newbury 








37 


3 


- 


3 


34 


1 


33 


Newburyport 








245 


37 


37 


- 


208 


2 


206 


Newton 








728 


49 


25 


24 


679 


7 


672 


Norfolk 








17 


- 


- 


- 


17 


2 


15 


North Adams 








403 


70 


21 


49 


333 


2 


331 


North Andover . 








98 


11 


5 


6 


87 


5 


82 


North Attleborough . 








295 


28 


28 


- 


267 


- 


267 


North Brookfield 








57 


11 


10 


. 1 


46 


1 


45 


North Reading . 








30 


1 




1 


29 


3 


26 


Northampton 










483 


62 


39 


23 


421 


3 


418 


North borough 










24 


- 


- 


- 


24 


3 


21 


Northbridge 










140 


25 


17 


8 


115 


3 


112 


Northfield . 










5 


2 


- 


2 


3 


1 


9 


Norton 












66 


1 


- 


1 


65 


3 


62 


Norwell 












35 


11 


4 


7 


24 


5 


19 


Norwood 












115 


5 


1 


4 


110 


15 


95 


Oak Bluffs . 












7 


- 


- 


- 


7 


7 


- 


Oakham 












3 


1 


- 


1 


2 


2 


- 


Orange 












164 


2 


- 


2 


162 


13 


149 


Orleans 












10 


2 


- 


2 


8 


2 


6 


Otis . 












1 


- 


- 


_ 


1 


1 


- 


Oxford 












83 


16 


10 


6 


67 


3 


64 


Palmer 












176 


19 


17 


2 


157 


9 


148 


Paxton 












15 


4 


1 


3 


11 




11 


Peabody 












496 


56 


49 


7 


440 


46 


394 


Pelham 












2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


1 


1 


Pembroke 












26 


4 


4 


_ 


22 


- 


22 


Pepperell 












23 


8 


8 


- 


15 


- 


15 


Peru 












_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


— 


— 


Petersham 












4 


_ 


- 


- 


4 


1 


3 


Phillipston 
Pittsfield 












9 


_ 


_ 


_ 


9 


2 


7 












1,425 


136 


91 


45 


1,289 


7 


1,282 


Plainfield 












- 






- 




- 


- 


Plainville 












5 


_ 


_ 


- 


5 


2 


3 


Plymouth 












301 


13 


12 


1 


288 


4 


284 


Plympton 












1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


Prescott 












2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


1 


1 


Princeton 












3 


3 


3 


- 


- 


> 


- 


Provincetow 


n 










143 


11 


9 


2 


132 


3 


129 


Quincy 












707 


89 


43 


46 


618 


17 


601 


Randolph 












80 


21 


21 


- 


59 


3 


56 


Ray n ham 












46 


3 


- 


3 


43 


1 


42 


Reading 












185 


10 


4 


6 


175 


8 


167 


Rehoboth 












11 


- 


- 


- 


11 


3 


8 


Revere 












700 


20 


1 


19 


680 


17 


663 


Richmond 












3 








3 


_ 


3 


Rochester 












26 


_ 


- 


_ 


26 


3 


23 


Rockland 












224 


17 


15 


2 


207 


20 


187 


Rockport 












137 


10 


9 




127 




127 


Rowe . 












1 


~ 


~ 


~ 


1 


" 


1 



DEPART.AIEXT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. 



STATISTICS OF POOR RELIEF. 



Table I. — Nu7nber of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during the Year ending 

March 31, 19^2 — Continued. 













Aggre- 


In Institutions 


Outside 


CITIES AND 














TOWNS 


gate 




In Alms- 
houses 


In Other 




In Pri- 


In their 






Total 


Insti- 


Total 


vate 


Own 








tutions 




Families 


Homes 


Rowley 


35 








35 


3 


32 


Royalston . 










29 


- 


- 


- 


29 


8 


21 


Russell 










5 


1 


— 


1 


4 


. 2 


2 


Rutland 










17 


3 


1 


9 


14 


3 


11 


Salem . 










3,225 


199 


126 


73 


3,026 


22 


3,004 


Salisbury 










28 


- 


- 


_ 


28 


1 


27 


Sandisfield . 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




Sandwich 










26 


- 


- 


- 


26 


2 


24 


Saugus 










187 


6 


4 


2 


181 


9 


172 


Savoy . 










1 


- 


- 


_ 


1 


1 


_ 


Scituate 










47 


2 


- 


2 


45 


4 


41 


Seekonk 










20 


2 


2 


- 


18 


- 


18 


Sharon 










27 


1 


- 


1 


26 


5 


21 


Sheffield 










17 


2 


- 


2 


15 


6 


9 


Shelburne 










3 


- 


_ 


- 


3 


3 


_ 


Sherborn 










28 


1 


- 


1 


27 




27 


Shirley 










30 


2 


- 


2 


28 


_ 


28 


Shrewsbury 










71 


- 


- 


- 


71 


_ 


71 


Shutesbury 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Somerset 










63 


6 


5 


1 


57 


- 


57 


Somerville . 










1,273 


165 


59 


106 


1,108 


41 


1,067 


South Hadley 










144 


22 


5 


17 


122 




122 


Southampton 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




Southborough 










22 


6 


- 


6 


16 


1 


15 


Southbridge 










424 


24 


21 


3 


400 


21 


379 


Southwick . 










22 


2 


2 


- 


20 


1 


19 


Spencer 










107 


14 


10 


4 


93 




93 


Springfield . 










5.062 


711 


493 


218 


4,351 


65 


4,286 


Sterling 










4 


3 


2 


1 


1 


1 


- 


Stockbridge 










7 


3 


2 


1 


4 


- 


4 


Stoneham . 










122 


11 


8 


3 


111 


- 


111 


Stoughton . 










143 


12 


10 


2 


131 


1 


130 


Stow . 










2 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2 


2 


_ 


St ur bridge . 










22 


5 


5 


- 


17 


- 


17 


Sudbury 










2 


1 


_ 


1 


J 


_ 


1 


Sunderland 










30 




- 




30 


_ 


30 


Sutton 










109 


13 


4 


9 


96 


12 


84 


Swampscott 










111 


6 


- 


6 


105 


1 


104 


Swansea 










6 


- 


- 


- 


6 


- 


6 


Taunton 










1,733 


126 


124 


2 


1,607 


30 


1,577 


Templeton . 










40 


1 




1 


39 


5 


34 


Tewksbury . 










44 


2 


- 


2 


42 


- 


42 


Tisbury 










13 


_ 


_ 


_ 


13 


_ 


13 


Tolland 












_ 


- 


_ 




_ 




Topsfield 










7 


1 


- 


1 


6 


5 


1 


Townsend . 










55 


13 


8 


5 


42 


2 


40 


Truro . 










2 


_ 




_ 


2 


_ 


2 


Tyngsborough 










1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


TjTingham . 










- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


- 


Upton . 










35 


5 


5 


- 


30 


1 


29 


Uxbridge 










53 


13 


6 


7 


40 


1 


39 


Wakefield . 










248 


14 


14 


- 


234 


1 


233 


Wales . 










2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


_ 


W^alpole 










137 


3 


- 


3 


134 


13 


121 


Waltham 










538 


44 


28 


16 


494 


4 


490 


Ware . 










191 


18 


9 


9 


173 


1 


172 


Wareham 










118 


6 


5 


1 


112 


1 


111 


Warren 










79 


12 


8 


4 


67 


1 


66 


Warwick 










8 


1 


- 


1 


7 


1 


6 


Washington 










1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


1 




Watertown . 










492 


41 


11 


30 


451 


33 


418 


Wayland . 










5 


1 


_ 


1 


4 


_ 


4 


Webster 










535 


22 


18 


4 


513 


6 


507 


Wellesley . 










40 


1 


- 


1 


39 


2 


37 


Wellfleet . 










37 


■ 


~ 


^ 


36 


4 


32 



Part III.] 



STATISTICS OF POOR RELIEF. 



127 



NUMBER OF POOR PERSONS SUPPORTED OR RELIEVED. 



Table I. — Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during the Year ending 

March 31, 1922 — Concluded. 



CITIES AND 
TOWNS 



Wendell 

■Wenham 

West Boylston 

West Bridgewater 

West Brookfield 

West Newbury 

West Springfield 

West Stockbridge 

West Tisbury 

West borough 

West field 

West ford 

Westhampton 

Westminster 

Weston 

West port 

West wood 

Weymouth 

Whately 

Whitman 

Wilbraham 

Williamsburg 

Williamstown 

Wilmington 

Winchendon 

Winchester . 

Windsor 

Winthrop 

Woburn 

Worcester . 

Worthington 

Wrentham . 

Yarmouth . 

Totals . 



Aggre- 
gate 



In Ixstitutigx; 



Outside 



10 

24 

84 

17 

15 

398 

4 

1 

63 
750 
58 

27 
2 

38 

12 

358 

2 

101 

84 

44 

27 

29 

179 

310 

3 

127 

816 

5,309 

11 

29 



117,587 



Total 



In Alms- 
houses 



In Other 
Insti- 
tutions 



Total 



2 




2 ,, 


1 


_ 


1 1 


4 




- 


3 




3 


6 




5 


10 




10 


1 




- 


11 


11 


_ 


42 


38 


4 


9 




2 


4 


2 


2 


1 


_ 


1 l! 


2 


2 




4 


- 


4 


1 


- 


1 


8 


_ 


8 


_ 


_ 


i. 


11 


_ 


11 


22 


20 


2 


3 


_ 


3 


1 


- 


1 


3 


- 


3 


36 


21 


15 


267 


255 


12 


1 


- 


1 


8 


8 




1 


- 


1 


11,574 


7.444 


4,130 



5 

9 

20 

81 

11 

15 

388 

3 

1 

52 

708 



23 

1 

36 

12 

354 

2 

100 

84 

36 

27 

18 

157 

307 

2 

124 

780 

,042 

10 

21 

48 



106.013 



In Pri- 
vate 
Families 



10 

5 

153 



In their 

Own 
Homes 



19 
81 
11 
15 
371 
1 

50 

700 

46 



36 

12 

325 

2 

83 

83 

36 

23 

17 

156 

299 

2 

114 

775 

5,889 

10 

21 

44 



1,670 104,343 



128 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. 1). 17. 



STATISTICS OF POOR RELIEF. 



Table II. — Xumbcr of Poor Persons Supported or Relicird by the State in Institutions, 
in Prirott F<nniliei> (ind in tluir Own Homes, during the )'e(ir ending March 31, 1922. 





In Institutions 


Outside 


Aggregate 


Total 


State 
Infirm- 
ary 


Alms- 
house 
Ward. 
State 
Farm 


Massa- 
chusetts 
Hos- 
pital 
School 


Town 
or 

City 
Alms- 
house 


Other 
Insti- 
tutions 


Total 


In 
Pri- 
vate 
Fami- 
lies 


In 

their 

Own 

Home 


35.264 


5.338 


3,247 


505 


97 


565 


924 


29.926 


271 


29.655 



Table III. 



Movement during the Year ending March 31, 1922, of the Poor Supported 
or Relieved. 



SOURCE OF SUPPORT 
OR RELIEF 


Number 
Sup- 
ported 
or 
Relieved 
April 1, 
1921 


Number 
admitted 

to 

Support 

or Relief 

during 

the Year 


Number who died, were 
discharged from support. oh were 
transferred TO Other Insti- 
tutions DURING the Year 


Number 
remain- 
April 1, 

1922 




Total 


Died 


Dis- 
charged 


Trans- 
ferred 


Cities and towns 

State 


43.171 
13.214 


43.001 
22,050 


40,848 
19.724 


1,395 

497 


38,605 848 
18,512 715 


45,324 
15,540 


Totals 


56,385 


65,051 


60,572 


1,892 


57,117 1.563 


60,864 



Part III.] 



STATISTICS OF POOR RELIEF. 



129 



NUMBER OF POOR PERSONS SUPPORTED OR RELIEVED. 



GO 






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130 



DEP.\IIT]\IEXT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 



STATISTICS OF POOR RELIEF. 





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Part III. 



STATISTICS OF POOR RELIEF. 



131 



NUMBER OF POOR PERSONS SUPPORTED OR RELIEVED. 






^5 



a 




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1 


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t-C«3 


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132 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 



STATISTICS OF POOR RELIEF. 









1^ 



I 





o 
a 

S 

•< 


ondandg 


o 


Table Xl. — Numerical Relation to the Whole Population of the Several Classes of Persons Relieved at Public Expense durinq the Year endina 

March 31, 1922. 


o 

1 

0. 
O 

IS 

a 

CM 
K 
pq 

;2; 


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Part III.] 



STATISTICS OF POOR RELIEF. 



133 



COST OF SUPPORT AND RELIEF. 



1 K« 

if 






1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 r 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 




On Ac- 
count of 
Insti- 
tutions 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ( 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 








Net 
Ordinary 
Expend- 
itures 


$4,144 28 
621 59 

3,665 79 
15,899 72 

3,974 17 


ocoi-oi-iocnro-o^ri-rosioo-^coci- loot^c^ioo'j''*-^ 
COCOCOJ-. orir-.oc-ico- — oo-r — cot-to=-. ^ — oooJj^^t- 
ooc:5— -co— " — c^j— loooco- ocouoaiicocoot^OOr^t^O-* 

2 s;-, g g 2i ■" -.s g s -.§ o s s § i qs § s - 5 s ? g 

00 CMCO C>1*CM* »o"cOCO CM*CO CO "OCO -< CiiOn^ •*"•** CM* 




Pi 


<;5 


$4,488 80 

1,639 68 

5,660 78 

321 03 


3,954 03 

573 37 

3,097 22 

8,040 40 

694 36 

212 00 

1,422 68 

2,605 80 

8,162 08 

940 16 

285 34 

229 00 

6,195 04 

627 30 

163 00 

787 90 

489 96 

1,052 60 

2,490 99 

1,512 75 

21,506 52 

3,555 99 

93 75 




On Ac- 
count of 
Support 
and 
Relief 
in Alms- 
houses 


$3,749 40 


1,727 47 
470 61 

2,082 23 
581 60 

3,812 58 

469 55 

2,887 39 

3,02*55 
3,113 98 

2,207 76 
2,920 69 




m 
a 
a 

t 

a 

a 

X 

>> 

« 

o 
ce; 

O 


Admin- 
istration 


$950 00 
99 42 

150 00 
1,459 54 

378 00 


285 06 

219 82 

600 00 

1,265 13 

137 76 

35 00 

60 00 

92 00 

1,086 65 

2,544 05 

12 95 

150 00 
600 00 
250 00 
338 75 
455 75 

163 97 
370 35 

88 00 
145 00 

20 00 

4,021 67 

47103 

32 79 




a 




H 


$4,995 67 
93 27 

3,189 74 
11,535 60 

2,811 58 


6,074 78 

174 91 

8,080 73 

15,212 03 

2,326 31 

38 29 

204 93 

5,300 23 

9,642 50 

19,705 10 

2,719 38 

3,484 85 

452 78 

15,041 63 

1,012 01 

703 58 

1,071 94 

1,440 27 

2,368 42 

4,080 03 

930 17 

679 00 

64,775 04 

4.132 62 

269 75 

461 97 




5.1 


$864 50 
40147 

1,355 38 
454 13 
355 82 


218 48 
1,614 23 

783 07 

245 00 
358 92 
579 29 

581 68 

315 00 

1,323 40 

464 68 

208 57 
922 00 

346 00 

1,715 00 
857 00 

522 74 




o 

CO 

Z 

Z 


1 1 2 

PI 


$678 49 
27 43 

610 35 
2,680 26 

749 80 


733 57 

933 74 

1,385 37 

1,488 09 

155 14 

48 00 

936 51 

334 19 

2,151 67 

692 41 

108 50 
304 03 

40 00 

11743 

4 00 

1,201 01 

893 57 

6,569 04 

67 00 

392 00 






$1,144 42 
9,180 37 


6,477 91 

6,673 08 

1,979 03 

276 23 

6,814 06 

7,713 31 

68 61 

6,616 10 
4,488 93 
5,542 24 

4,112 75 
7,848 14 

11,600 73 
5,866 37 
1,799 65 




1 


$8,633 08 
621 59 

5,305 47 
25,309 90 

4,295 20 


13.789 80 

2,942 70 

16,739 18 

20.727 35 

2,895 44 

121 29 

264 93 

6,573 74 

18,236 32 

32,694 32 

3.493 35 
4,066 53 
7,642 38 

21,757 99 
7,269 83 
1,082 33 
1,853 69 
6,479 02 

10,380 53 

5,651 39 

1,027 17 

2,063 57 

20 00 

88,681 48 

11,394 02 

2.494 19 
984 71 




Grand 
ToUil 
Expend- 
itures 


$8,633 08 
621 59 

5,305 47 
25,309 90 

4,295 20 


13,789 80 

2,942 70 

16,739 18 

20,727 35 

2,895 44 

121 29 

264 93 

6.573 74 

18.236 32 

32,694 32 

3.493 35 
4.066 53 
7,642 38 

21,757 99 
7,269 83 
1,082 33 
1,853 69 
6,479 02 

10,380 53 

5,651 39 

1,027 17 

2,063 57 

20 00 

88,681 48 

11,394 02 

2.494 19 
984 71 





















Abington . 

Acton 

Acushnet . 

Adams 

Agawam . 

Alford 

Amesbury 

Amherst . 

Andover . 

Arlington . 

Ashburnham' 

Ashby 

Ash field . 

Ashland 

Athol 

Attleboro . 

Auburn' . 

Avon 

Ayer 

Barnstable 

Barre 

Becket 

Bedford . 

Belchertown 

Belli ngham 

Belmont . 

Berkley . 

Berlin 

Bernardston 

Beverly 

Billerica 

lilackstone 

Blandford 





134 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 



STATISTICS OF POOR RELIEF. 












C 3 C -e 



I I I I I 



ttll 



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Part III.] 



STATISTICS OF POOR RELIEF. 



135 



COST OF SUPPORT AND RELIEF. 



1 r 


• 


1 1 1 1 


1 


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1 


1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 


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136 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 



STATISTICS OF POOR RELIEF. 



^ o 

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tutions 


$1.114 35 
298 20 


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3.700 26 
2,168 57 

899 16 
2,667 63 

193 61 

27 65 
6,730 96 
1,027 81 
4,000 00 
1,099 68 
7.381 49 
1,766 97 

138,515 00 

1,904 10 

31 10 

8,290 73 

2,295 67 

4,487 01 

532 50 

12 93 

2,555 46 

170,460 91 

635 53 

2,803 81 

434 93 

13,387 97 

5,880 90 

2,705 84 

10,760 58 

7,546 30 

28 02 
2,451 10 
1,328 04 


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813 87 

39 76 

48 00 

2,045 57 

205 00 

785 28 

82,564 10 
14123 

6,358 52 
633 01 

2,81101 
741 34 

2,898 14 

8,870 74 

630 50 

373 97 

48 00 

1,476 01 

2,964 70 

642 00 

550 43 

2,186 13 

910 21 

1,349 62 

48 00 


On Ac- 
count of 
Support 
and 
Relief 
in Alms- 
houses 


$3,859 22 
8 00 

412 00 
766 04 

3,069 79 
3 00 

8,279 32 
1,314 54 

3,652 90 
3,752 09 

1,317 96 
2,321 05 
4,540 01 


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200 85 
50 00 

20 56 
129 50 

21 00 
750 00 

50 00 

300 00 

90 00 

6,252 71 
40 10 

505 66 

226 56 

104 26 

8 00 

184 09 

8,638 71 

124 39 
84 00 
591 43 
696 50 
325 00 
550 82 
325 00 
385 50 
246 05 
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1,590 14 

682 00 

2,123 28 

49 00 

37 00 

5,058 41 

323 73 

3,101 88 

3,820 71 

239 61 

73,395 68 

1,153 35 

31 10 

9,859 00 

2,005 53 

6,220 61 

483 67 

3,699 40 
122,107 73 

113 75 
1,109 80 
96 00 
8,301 28 
6,845 47 
1,714 34 
7,188 38 
6,352 20 

552 73 
2,014 13 

549 04 




$145 00 
776 00 
275 00 

48 00 
460 00 

27 87 

664 57 

86 72 

937 91 

879 87 
788 88 

419 95 
923 15 
850 85 

1,135 93 

228 57 
270 63 

65100 
1,202 00 
1,235 50 
2,051 14 

29143 
504 00 


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$498 00 
253 43 
148 60 

156 50 
17 65 

183 90 
23 28 

410 68 

694 92 

663 36 

108,175 93 

63 00 

183 71 

517 54 

11,124 89 

16 35 

39 30 

32 30 

1,392 30 

509 78 

■10 59 

365 57 

1,004 09 

306 43 
272 00 


In Alms- 
houses 


$5,624 76 
327 44 

768 72 

2,531 65 
1,601 84 

100 72 
4,079 47 
2,716 23 

864 00 
40,654 23 

4,995 47 

168 37 

4 93 

5,223 01 

41,212 41 

1,675 72 

5,896 93 

142 85 

96 00 

4,291 79 

5,482 69 


1 
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$5,919 76 
6,449 13 

2.168 57 
899 16 

3,481 50 
233 37 
75 65 
9,188 53 
1,998 85 
4,000 00 

4.169 47 
8,169 77 
1,766 97 

229,358 42 

2,045 33 

31 10 

15,963 79 

2,928 68 

7,298 02 

1,273 84 

12 93 

9,106 50 

183,083 74 

1,266 03 

3,177 78 

482 93 

16,181 94 

8,845 60 

3,347 84 

13,632 06 

9,732 43 

938 23 

8,340 73 

1.376 04 


Grand 
Total 
Expend- 
itures 


$5,919 76 
6,449 13 

2.168 57 
899 16 

3,481 50 
233 37 
75 65 
9,188 53 
1,998 85 
4,000 00 

4.169 47 
8,169 77 
1,766 97 

230,472 77 

2,045 33 

31 10 

15,963 79 

2,928 68 

7,298 02 

1,273 84 

12 93 

9,404 70 

183,083 74 

1,266 03 

3,177 78 

482 93 

16,181 94 

8,845 60 

3,347 84 

13,632 06 

9,732 43 

938 23 

8,900 73 

1,376 04 




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2Srt'H^Srt53fe^rtrt§§ S.S.S'OO'O O'C O C = 3 3 3 ^S-^ i i 



Part III.] 



STATISTICS OF POOR RELIEF. 



137 



COST OF SUPPORT AND RELIEF. 



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138 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 



STATISTICS OF POOR RELIEF. 


































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CO o 



Part III.] 



STATISTICS OF POOR RELIEF. 



139 



COST OF SUPPORT AND RELIEF. 



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South borough . 
Southbridge 
South wick 



140 



DEPARTMENT OF Pl'BLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17. 



STATISTICS OF POOR RELIEF. 



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fi o a 



Part III.] 



STATISTICS OF POOR RELIEF. 



141 



COST OF SUPPORT AND RELIEF. 



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142 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. [P. D. 17, Part IIL 



STATISTICS OF POOR RELIEF. 









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INDEX 



Adoptions .......... 

Adult poor provided for in families, the settled 

Advisory Board, present members of .... . 

Ages at death of certain infants ...... 

Aid and Relief, Division of ...... . 

Subdivision of Mothers' Aid ...... 

See Mothers' Aid, Subdi\'ision of. 

Subdivision of Settlements ...... 

See Settlements, Subdivision of. 

Subdivision of Social Service ...... 

See Social Ser\dce, Subdivision of. 

Supervision of Wayfarers' lodges and public lodging houses 
Almshouse department at the State Farm, Bridgewater 
Almshouses, Dependent minor children with settlement provided for 
Almshouses, the city and town 

Closed ...... 

Inspection of . 

Laws relating to ' . 

New ...... 

Recommendations made . 

Visitors ..... 

Boarding houses for infants, licensed 
Boys' Parole ..... 

See Juvenile Training, Division of. 
Building Regulations in Massachusetts 

See Housing and Town Planning, Division of. 
Burials ...... 

Canton, Massachusetts Hospital School . 
Capacity of Institutions 
Causes of dependency (mothers' aid) 
Child Guardianship .... 

Adoptions ..... 

Ages at death of infants . 

Applications for discharge 

Children in care and custody of the division 

Children in custody during year, summary of all 

Children over three years of age 

Children over three years of age, summary of 

Children under three years of age 

Children under tlu'ee years of age, summary of 

C'ollections for support received from cities and towns and directly from parents 

Disposition by the courts of cases of delinquent and wayward children 

Disposition by the courts of neglected children 

Disposition of children over three years of age 

Infant mortality, between one and three years 

Infant mortality, under one year 

Investigation, Subdivision of . 

Licensed boarding houses for infants 

Licensed lying-in hospitals 

Localities from which children are received 

Tutition of children under the care and control of the Department 
Children with settlement provided for in almshouses, dependent minor 
Children with settlement provided for outside of almshouses, dependent minor 
Cities and towns, penalty incurred for failure to make returns during the month of 

1922 

Cities and towns in which zoning is in progress 

Cities and towns which have been zoned . 

City and town poor, the 

Commissioner of Public Welfare, report of 

County training schools, the . 

Dangerous Diseases .... 

Death of certain infants. Ages at 

Delinquent and wayward children, disposition by the courts of cases of 



April, 



144 



INDEX. 



Department of Public Welfare 

Members of advisory board .... 

Report of Commissioner ..... 
Department's finances, the ..... 
Dependency, causes of . 
Dependent minor children 

With settlement provided for in almshouses 

With settlement provided for outside almshouses 
Discharge, applications for .... . 

Disposition by the courts of cases of delinquent and wayward children 
Disposition by the courts of cases of neglected children 
Disposition of children over three years of age 
Division of Aid and Relief 

See Aid and Relief, Division of. 
Division of Child Guardianship 

See Child Guardianship, Division of. 
Division of Juvenile Training 

See Juvenile Training, Division of. 
Essex County Training School, Lawrence 
Finances, the Deptu-tment's 
Financial Supervision of Institutions 

See Institutions. 
Five Institutions ..... 

See Institutions. 
Girls' Parole ..... 

See Juvenile Training, Division of. 
Hampden County Training School, Springfield 
Hospital School at Canton, the Massachusetts 
Hospitals, Licensed Lying-in . 
Housing and Town Planning, Division of 

Building regulations in NIassachusetts 

Housing experiment at Lowell . 

Town planning progress . 
Industrial School for Boys, Shirley . 
Industrial School for Girls, The State 

Infant Mortality 

Infants, Licensed Boarding houses for 

Infants under 2 years of age, summary of 

Infants with sore eyes, discharged from Lj4ng-in Hospitals 

Institutional supervision 

Institutions ...... 

Almshouse Department of State Farm, Bridgewater 

Capacity and population 

County Training Schools 

Financial Supervision of Institutions 
Analysis of pay-roll 
Expenditures .... 
Inventory ..... 
Maintenance, net weekly per capita cost 
Receipts ..... 

Industrial School for boys, Shirley 

Lyman School for Boys, West borough 

^Iassachusetts Hospital School, Canton 

Numbers ..... 

State Industrial School for Girls, Lancaster 

State Infirmary, Tewksbury 
See State Infirmarj-. 
Investigation, subdivision of . 
Juvenile Training, Division of 

Boys' Parole Branch 

Girls' Parole Branch 
Lancaster, State Industrial School for Girls 
Laws affecting the Department passed by the Legislature of 1922 

Act constituting a special commission to provide for clearing the woods of the metro- 
politan parks of fallen trees and broken limbs and branches, and making an ap- 
propriation therefor ........... 

Act making an appropriation to continue the work of clearing the forests of the 
metropolitan parks of fallen trees and broken limbs and branches 

Act relative to aid of mothers of certain dependent children between fourteen and 
sixteen years of age ........... 

Act relative to the acquisition of settlements by soldiers and sailors 

Act relative to the instruction of certain mentally retarded children . . . 

Act relative to the powers and duties of the trustees of the Massachusetts Hospital 
School ............. 



55 

57 

58 
56 
57 



INDEX. 



145 



Laws affecting the Department passed by the Legislature of 1922 — Conclvded. 

Act relative to the settlement of paupers ........ 58 

Resolve making provision for an investigation as to the desirability of providing for 

the aid of certain physically handicapped persons other than the blind, and for 

their temporary relief during the current year 

Licensed boarding houses for infants ....... 

Localities whence new children are received ...... 

Lj-ing-in hospitals, licensed ......... 

Lyman School for Boj's, Westborough ....... 

Massachusetts Hospital School, Act relative to powers and duties of trustees of 
Massachusetts Hospital School, Canton ....... 

Members of Advisory Board ......... 

Mentally retarded children, an act relative to instruction of . . . 

Middlesex county training school, North Chelmsford .... 

Mothers' Aid, Subdivision of . 

Act relative to aid to mothers of children between fourteen and sixteen years of age 

Amendment to mothers' aid law .... 

Causes for closing mothers' aid cases 

Causes of dependency ...... 

Cost of mothers' aid, State appropriation to date 

Duration of mothers' aid cases .... 

Statistics ........ 

Neglected Children, disposition by the courts of 
Norfolk, Bristol and Plymouth Union Training School, Walpole 

Physically handicapped persons, a resolve making provision for an investigation as to the 
desirability of providing for the aid of certain physically handicapped persons 
other than the blind, and for their temporary relief during the current year 
Poor relief, returns of, penalty for failure to make 
Poor Relief, Statistics of - . 
Private Charities ......... 

Report of the Commissioner of Public Welfare 

Settled poor relieved or supported by cities and towns, support of 

City and town poor ....... 

Dependent minor children with settlement pro\dded for in almshouses 

Dependent minor children with settlement provided for outside alm.shouses 

Penalty of certain cities and towns for failure to make their returns during the month 
of April, 1922 .... 

Settled adult poor provided for in families 
Settlement of paupers, act relative to 
Settlements, Subdivision of 

Audit .... 

Burials .... 

Dangerous diseases 

Removals ... 

Shipwrecked seamen 

Sick State Poor 

Temporary Aid 

Wife Settlement 
Shirley, Industrial School for Boys 
Sick state poor 
Social Service, Subdivision of 

Aged women . 

Children 

Court work . 

Discharges and follow-up work 

General Summary 

Summary of placement work 

Women and children admitted to State Infi 
1922 

Women with children 
Soldiers and sailors. Act relative to acquisition of settlements by 
Special Commission for clearing metropolitan parks of fallen trees and broken limbs and 

branches, an act relative to ......... 55 

State Farm, Bridgewater, almshouse department at . . . . . . .38 

State Industrial School for Girls, Lancaster ........ 41 

State infirmary, Tewksbury ........... 37 

Statistics of Poor Relief 119 

Cost 121, 133 

Numbers relieved . . . . . . . . . .119, 122 

Subdivision of Investigation ........... 20 

See Investigation, subdivision of. 
Subdivision of Mothers' Aid ........... 10 

See Mothers' Aid, Subdivision of. 
Subdivision of Settlements 

See Settlements, Subdivision of 



rmary during year ending N 



ovember 30 



146 



INDEX. 



Subdivision of Social Service ........ 

See Social Service, Subdivision of. 
Sui)ervision of Institutions ........ 

Supervision of the settled poor relieved or supported by cities and town 
Sui)ervision of wayfarers' lodges and public lodging houses 
Temporary Aid .......... 

Tewksbury, State Infirmary at ...... . 

See State Infirmary. 
Town Planning, Housing and ....... 

Training Schools, County ........ 

Training Schools, State ......... 

Tuition of children under the care and control of the Department 

Wayfarers' lodges and public lodging houses, supervision of 

West borough, Lyman School for Boys ...... 

Wife-settlement .......... 

Worcester County Training School, Oakdale (West Boylston) 



PAGK 

13 

43 
53 

8 

8 

37 



33 
51 
38 
31 

8 
38 

9 
52 



Public Document No. 17 



C6e Commontoealtj) of 9^a00acf)U0ett0 
ANNUAL REPORT 



DEPARTMENT 



OF 



Public Welfare 



Ye a:r. ENDING NovFMPEi^ 30r 1923 




Publication of this Documbnt approvsd bt thb Commission on Administration and Financb 



PAST MEMBERS OF THE STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. 



Date of Original 
Appointment 


Name 


Residence 


Retired 


June 


7, 1879 


Moses Kimball 


Boston 


October 


27, 1880 


June 


7, 1879 


Nathan Allen, M.D. . 






Lowell 




June 


7, 1880 


June 


7, 1879 


Henry I. BoivditcTi, M.D. 






Boston 




January 


24, 1880 


June 


7, 1879 


Charles F. Donnelly 






Boston 




June 


7, 1907 


June 


7, 1879 


Edward Hitchcock, M.D. 






Amherst . 




June 


7, 1906 


June 


7, 1879 


Albert Wood, M.D. 






Worcester . 




June 


7, 1880 


June 


7, 1879 


Robert T. Davis, M.D. 






Fall River . 




January 


22, 1884 


June 


7, 1879 


John C. Hoadley . 






LawTence . 




November 


16, 1882 


June 


7, 1879 


Ezra Parmenter, AAZ). 






Cambridge 




February 


1883 


January 


27, 1880 


David L. Webster . 






Boston 




April 


11, 1881 


June 


8, 1880 


Charles F. Folsom, M.D. 






Boston 




January 


14, 1881 


June 


8, 1880 


Clara T. Leonard 






Springfield 




March 


19, 1886 


November 


5, 1880 


Thomas Talbot . . 






Billerica 




March 


12, 1884 


January 


22, 1881 


Alfred Hosmer, M.D. . 






Watertown 




December 


4, 1882 


April 


18, 1881 


George P. Carter . 






Cambridge 




June 


7, 1883 


November 23, 1882 


John Fallon 






Lawrence . 




December 


15, 1889 


December 


8, 1882 


Henry P. Walcott, M.D. 






Cambridge 




June 


7, 1885 


February 


14, 1883 


Albert A. Haggett 






Lowell 




October 


26, 1885 


May 


31, 1883 


Reuben Noble 






Westfield . 




Jime 


16, 1885 


July 


18, 1883 


Edgar E. Dean, M.D. . 






Brockton . 




December 


1, 1887 


March 


19, 1884 


Everett Torrey 






Boston 




August 


16, 1886 


June 


16, 1885 


Charles A. Denny 






Leicester . 




November 


4, 1889 


July 


16, 1885 


Samuel A. Green, M.D. 






Boston 




May 


15, 1886 


April 


14, 1886 


Anne B. Richardson . 






Lowell 




January 


26, 1899 


April 


21, 1886 


Henrietta G. Codman . 






Brookline . 




May 


16, 1906 


December 


22, 1886 


Richard L. Hodgdon, M.D. 






Arlington . 




January 


30, 1893 


December 


22, 1886 


Charles C. Coffin . 






Boston 




December 


17, 1889 


January 


25, 1888 


D. Webster King . 






Boston 




August 


5, 1889 


December 


4, 1889 


George W. Johnson 






Brookfield . 




September 


1, 1903 


December 


24, 1889 


Henry Stone 






Boston 




January 


1, 1894 


December 


24, 1889 


Laban Pratt . 






Boston 




June 


7, 1909 


January 


1, 1890 


Ziba C. Keith . 






Brockton . 




June 


11, 1891 


June 


11, 1891 


Charles J. Curran, M.D. 






North Adams 




June 


7, 1896 


June 


22, 1893 


Richard M. Hodges, M.^D. 






Boston 




January 


1, 1895 


February 


15, 1894 


Leontine Lincoln . 






Fall River . 




November 


30, 1919 


February 


14, 1895 


John L. Hildreth, M.D. 






Cambridge 




July 


2, 1898 


June 


4, 1896 


Edward H. Haskell . 






Newton 




November 


2, 1897 


November 16, 1897 


Jabez Fox 






Cambridge 




September 


5, 1900 


June 


22, 1898 


Henry S. Nourse . 






Lancaster . 




November 


14, 1903 


July 


7, 1898 


James M. Pullman, D.D. 






Lynn . 




November 


22, 1903 


February 


23, 1899 


Annette P. Rogers 






Boston 




December 


15, 1899 


December 


13, 1899 


Frances Greely Curtis . 






Boston 




September 


3, 1915 


August 


7, 1903 


Joseph Walker 






Brookline . 




January 


16, 1904 


December 


9, 1903 


Charles H. Adams 






Melrose 




November 


30, 1919 


December 


9, 1903 


David F. Tilley . 






Boston 




August 


17, 1915 


January 


14, 1904 


Charles R. Johnson 






Worcester . 




November 


30, 1919 


June 


6, 1906 


Abraham C. Ratshesky 






Boston 








June 


20, 1906 


Jeffrey R. Bracket t 






Boston 




_ 


_ 


June 


12, 1907 


Thomas Downey . 






Boston 




June 


27, 1917 


Jane 


16, 1909 


Ada Eliot Sheffield 






Cambridge 




December 


31, 1914 


December 


30, 1914 


Mary A. Barr 






Boston 




November 


30, 1919 


August 


11, 1915 


Robert M. Merrick, M.D. 






Boston 




November 


30, 1919 


August 


11, 1915 


Charlotte J. Guild 






Boston 




August 


1, 1916 


November 29, 1916 


Katharine H. Leonard 






Springfield 




November 


30, 1919 


June 


20, 1917 


B. Preston Clark . 






Cohasset . 




November 


30, 1919 



PRESENT MEMBERS OF THE ADVISORY BOARD OF THE DEPART- 
MENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. 









Term expires 


December 1, 1919 


Abraham C. Ratshesky 


Boston 


December 1, 1925 


December 1, 1919 


Jeffrey R. Brackett .... 


Boston 


December 1, 1925 


December 1, 1919 


George Crompton .... 


Worcester . 


December 1, 1924 


December 1, 1919 


George H. McClean .... 


Springfield 


December 1, 1924 


December 1, 1919 


Mrs. Ada Eliot Sheffield . 


Cambridge 


December 1, 1926 


December 1, 1919 


Mrs. Mary P. H. Sherburne 


Brookline . 


December 1, 1926 



LEONTINE LINCOLN. 

Member, Board of Lunacy and Charity, 1894-1898. 
Chairman, State Board of Charity, 1898-1919. 

On June 1st, 1923, in his seventy-seventh year, Leontine Lincoln died at 
Fall River, his home city. For a quarter of a century he was a devoted 
servant of the Commonwealth, a high type of the unpaid ti-ustees whose line 



2 P.D. 17, Part I. 

service have built up her institutions and lier departments. Fearless in con- 
flict, yet always a pacificator, a tine public-spirited gentleman, a courteous, 
firm and dignified chainuan, his interest in the thousands of neglected and 
unfortunate pei^sons under the care of the Board was based upon the intense 
kindliness of his character which so endeared him to the people of his own 
city of every class and standing. Guided by such a natural impulse toward 
friendly and useful service he was always an advocate of the principle that in 
public welfare work the city or town agents having close contact with the 
individual and close sympathy for a fellow townsman should administer the 
assijstance, leaving for the state the function of making policies, directing the 
general course which the cities and towns should follow and exercising constant 
and effective supervision. 

Part I . 
REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC WELFARE. 

To the Honordhle Senate and House of Eepresentatives. 

The Fourth Annual Report of the Department of Public Welfare covering 
the year from December 1, 1922, to November 30, 1923, is herewith respectfully 
pre-sented. 

A summary of the report of a department of social service ought occasionally 
to take full account of the zeal and intelligence of the workers upon whom its 
success depends. 

In the early days of the Board of State Charities, w'hich Avas established in 
1863, fine examples of service were set by Samuel Gridley Howe and the other 
unpaid Board members whose first reports got at the fundamental needs of 
the Commonwealth in charitable work, and stated the underlying principles 
clearly with the insight and sjTnpathy which came from their thorough and 
serious consideration of the beginnings of institutions.^ 

In the following years of the State Board of Health, Lunacy and Charity, 
established in 1879; the State Board of Lunacy and Charity, established in 
1886; the State Board of Charity, established in 1898; and the Department of 
Public Welfare, established in 1919 ; — the Board was able to command " serv- 
ants ", as they were literally named, avIio ^rere attracted to social ser\4ce by 
something else than its financial remunerations and who consecrated their lives 
upon the example of the founders. 

Today, although the jDroblems of mental diseases, correction and health have 
been removed to specialized departments, the remaining problems in the field 
of social ser^dce give to this department over seventy-five thousand persons for 
supervision in a single year, — a task which is accomplished not so much by 
laws, by sj-stems, or by appropriations as by the unstinted sendee of the 
workers. 

1 General Principles of Public Charity (Second Annual Report of the Board of State Charities, January 
1866): 

1. That if, by investing $1 we prevent an evil the correction of which would cost ten cents a year, we save 
four per cent. 

2. That it is better to separate and diffuse the dependent classes than to congregate them. 

3. That we ought to avail ourselves as much as possible of those remedial agencies which exist in society, — 
the family, social influences, industrial occupations and the like. 

4. That we should enlist not only the greatest possible amount of popular sympathy, but the greatest 
number of indi\'iduals and of families, in the care and treatment of the dependent. 

5. That we should avail ourselves of responsible societies and organizations which aim to reform, support 
or help any class of dependents, thus lessening the direct agency of the State and enlarging that of the people 
themselves. 

6. That we should build up public institutions only in the last resort. 

7. That these should be kept as small as is consistent with wise economy, and arranged so as to turn the 
strength and the faculties of the inmates to the best account. 

8. That we should not retain the inmates any longer than is manifestly for their good, irrespective of their 
usefulness in the institution. 



P.D. 17, Part I. 3 

Summary of Persons under Supervision, showing also the Apportionment of Visitors 

to Persons. 



Visitors 



Number 
of Persons 



1. In the State Infirmary, the Massachusetts Hospital School and the three train- 

ing schools 

2. On parole from the three training schools 

3. Minor wards, principally in foster homes 

4. Infants in boarding homes supervised 

5. Individuals aided in mothers' aid families . . - 

6. Individuals given temporary aid 

7. Individuals given sick aid 

8. Individuals aided because of dangerous diseases 

9. Individuals aided because of wife settlement 

10. Women and babies from the State Infirmary under supervision 

11. Children placed out by cities and towns and supervised 

12. Adults placed out by cities and towns and supervised 

13. Inmates of almshouses supervised 



6,602 

4,315 

6,955 

1,898 

16,806 

19,370 

5,923 

2,787 

253 

410 

1,336 

226 

9,075 



75,956 



As the table shows, the number of cases which each visitor is expected to 
care for is large; it is, in fact, much larger than the number which would be 
allotted in a private agency w^hich is able somewhat to limit the number of 
people for whom it will care. A standard acceptable to a good private agency 
would be one visitor to forty or fifty cases. Double and quadruple that 
burden falls upon the State \'isitor even though the departmental staff numbers 
209 and the institutional staff 754. 



DIVISION OF AID AND RELIEF. 

In the Division of Aid and Relief, the oldest of the three groups of visitors 
is the group of twelve men w^ho call upon families which have been granted 
aid by city and town Boards of Overseers; aid for which the State by law 
reimburses the municipality because the person in distress has no local settle- 
ment. Districts cover as many as twenty-nine cities and towns. Visitors must 
investigate the question of settlement, a difficult legal problem involving the 
history of the family's many removals and requiring a broad experience vnth 
laws and exceptions in laws; they must suggest the amount of aid which will 
be enough to pull the family out of distress and they must try to have it given 
in a waj^ to pull up rather than to push down. Their Avisdom and experience 
must guide the local Boards of Overseers. The unemployment period of 
1921-22 has left a burden of public relief which taxes our efforts to the utmost. 
The visitors' problems involve every phase of human failure, weakness, mis- 
fortune, and community maladjustment. The dean of this group of ^^sitors, 
a man now near the age of retirement, must, through these winters of hardship, 
searching for his families, climb many times a day the flights of Boston's 
tenement houses and always have ready his cheerful " Well, how are you 
getting along today ? " 

In a family which receives Mothers' Aid, the situation is expected to be more 
hopeful for improvement, because there is a definitely forseeable time when 
the family should become self-supporting, that is, — when the mother has 
educated her children to the age of self-support. And yet, often, human 
weaknesses and failures and misfortunes make these cases no less difficult and 
no less exhausting of the strength of the worker. Each of the ten women 
visitors has over three hundred families under her supervision. The state has 
supervision in all Mothers' Aid cases whether or not there is a local settlement, 
because it reimburses towns not only for unsettled cases but also for one-third 
of the expense of settled cases. Family plans must be wisely made with a 
simple budget of rent, food, fuel and clothing and the mother must be taught 
to use the plan. A visitor in the Department of Public Welfare has a very 
great financial responsibility. In many businesses and services it is possible 
through system and management to lessen the chance for error on the part of 



4 P.D. 17, Part I. 

operatives so that efficiency becomes almost automatic. In the work of this 
Department, on the contraiy, the visitor's own jiul<::ment is the primary factor 
in detennining whether the state shall help a family to the extent of one 
hundred dollars a year or one thousand dollars a year. Efficiency can come 
only throug:h the personal ability of the visitor. Unlimited hours of the day 
and of the evening are spent upon plans for improving the health, the strength, 
the earning power and the integrity of families. In one thousand twenty-six 
cases during the year Mothei's' Aid families have been brought to the point of 
self support and the aid terminated. The progress of ten yeai-s in the Mothei-s^ 
Aid ser\'ice is given in detail upon page 10. 

Two physicians visit dependent persons in city hospitals, making eight 
thousand investigations in a year; an attorney prosecutes erring fathers and 
desei-ting husbands; tAvo \isitors investigates the settlements of persons ad- 
mitted to state institutions and make it possible for the state to secure thousands 
of dollai-s in i-eimbursements from cities and towns; two examinei*s of settle- 
ments, one of them in his fifty-seventh year of state service, review all cases 
from the point of view of fixing the responsibility for support. 

AVomen patients at the State Infirmary at Tewksbury, the hospital of the 
Division, have the services of five visitors to find employment for them when 
they are discharged and afterwards to watch over them. To prevent women 
and especially children from being sent to the State Infirmary if any better 
plan can be made; to furnish the physicians at the Infirmary with the social 
service of infoiTnation about the patient and of a plan for her after care; 
— all these duties require an intimate acquaintance "with the women and a 
sympathetic understanding of them. At Christmas time, through the care 
and infinite pains of the visitors and their friends, each of the four hundred 
patients and discharged patients under super^dsion was given a box of gifts, 
home-made or bought with small funds contributed, and each box-full chosen 
and packed with thought of the particular person to receive it as her most 
cherished Christmas remembrance. 

Physicians, nui*ses, attendants and workers at the State Infinnary, give the 
Avhole-hearted ser\dce which patients in all Massachusetts institutions receive. 
At the graduation exercises of the nurses' training school each year, you may see 
the expression of that high devotion upon the faces of the one hundred and sixty 
Avhite-unifoi-med nui*ses Avho march through the beautiful campus to the chapel; 
and you may feel the expression of an even liigher loyalty in talking wdth the 
Superintendent who for twenty-five years has watched hundreds of people 
grow old there, and has, in caring for over one hundred and thirty thousand 
patients during those year's, battled with every known disease without losing 
a bit of his young enthusiasm for the task. 

DIVISION OF CHILD GUARDIANSHIP. 

A Nui*se Visitor, a Visitor to Children, a Visitor to Older Girls, a Visitor 
to Older Boys, — are these new kinds of state officials? In the beginning of 
the Commonwealth's now famous scheme of caring for motherless, fatherless, 
neglected, abandoned and delinquent children by placing them in foster homes 
and giving them normal family life instead of institutional training, the visitors 
were to a large extent philanthropic women who without paj^ undertook to visit 
five or six children in their foster homes and to report to the State House upon 
their treatment and progress. In 1887 these "Auxiliary Visitors " numbered 
ninety and they visited about five hundred children placed out from the State 
Primary School and the Industrial Schools. Now^ that the number of children 
under the visitation of the whole Department has grown to over nine thousand 
and more modern standards have come to require a greater volume of work in 
each case, it would not be possible to secure enough good voluntary sei-A^ice to 
be of consequence, but the traditions established in the organization by those 
women of high ideals and good common sense have kept on gromng, have kept 
the standard of foster homes high, and kept up, too, the standards of care 
over the lives of the children. 



P.D. 17, Part I. 5 

Each of the four nurse visitors is responsible for the care in foster homes, 
in a district near Boston, of a hundred babies under three years of age. She 
must find suitable foster homes, visit the babies and give skilled nursing super- 
vision -weekly or daily as may be necessary. A measure of Hie effort made by 
these nurses may be found in the number of babies' lives saved by the system 
of good family care and by the nurses' good supervision. In 1880 forty-seven 
per cent of the infants supported died; in 1923 only three per cent died. 

The hard work of the boarding women, the contributions made by foster 
mothers and all such contributions made by private citizens are so important 
that they had best be treated in another report. 

A group of five investigators in the Division of Child Guardianship work 
long days and evenings to prevent children from unnecessarily coming to our 
care, perhaps striving to secure the help of a private charitable agency or to 
enforce upon deserting parents or relatives their legal responsibility for 
supporting the children. By the efforts of these investigators to enforce 
character building responsibility, the Commonwealth has been saved hundreds 
of thousands of dollars. 

Sixteen women visitors to children, fourteen women visitors to older girls, 
and fifteen men visitors to older boys have certain duties which are in many 
respects similar. Each has a district of the state comprising perhaps fifteen 
cities and towns in which must be placed out and cared for a continually 
changing collection of children numbering from one hundred and twentj^-five 
to one hundred and seventy-five. Each visitor must find enough suitable 
foster homes, thoroughly investigate them, fit into them children who give 
some promise of being suitable for the particular homes; visit each child at 
least quarterly and enough oftener to know well its condition and situation; 
as soon as passible secure permanent free homes; intelligently care for the 
health, schooling, and work of the child and keep businesslike records of 
everji;hing of importance which happens to him; and make and carry out 
for the transplanted child the plan which will best enable him to grow up to 
become a self-supporting, self-respecting member of a family. In addition, 
the men attend all juvenile court sessions to protect the interests of children and 
to recommend to the Courts desirable plans for their care. 

A teacher can know^ a little about the personality of her forty children from 
being Avith them for five hours a day for forty weeks. A visitor must know 
much more about the personality and the home conditions of the two hundred 
children whom she has in charge during the year; she must be able to guide 
them through every sort of complex family situation; she must live their 
lives with them and for them; she must have fine judgment, great strength 
and unending sympathy. By way of illustration of the personal interest which 
the visitors have in their children, twenty-four hundred boys and- girls were 
given Christmas gifts, — toys, dolls, or other presents, made or secured by 
their visitors or through their efforts. In conclusion about the work of the 
visitors, one cannot avoid adding in these days that at a cost of four dollars 
and four cents per capita per week the five thousand five hundred and fifty 
children are more cheaply cared for through the kindness of the foster mothers 
and the efforts of the visitors than if the state were to build expensive insti- 
tutions in which to house them and were then to maintain them in such institu- 
tions at an expense of over eight dollars per week. 

An adoption agent, skilled in developing successful adoptions, selects and 
places children for adoption, visits them during the tnal period of a year 
which is required, and in a very large percentage of cases her results are 
successful. An ^attorney attends to the endless matters involved in legal 
guardianship and prosecutes for non-support those parents who ought to be 
made responsible. An inspector of two hundred and twenty-two maternity 
hospitals has gi'eatly improved the standards of the licensed hospitals and has 
done much to check the abandonment of infants. All the nurses enforce good 
standards in the licensed boarding houses for infants. 

At the Hospital School for Crippled Children at Canton the spirit of the 



6 P.D. 17, Part L 

doctors and nurses in making for badly damaged youngsters an atmosphere of 
complete happiness together with the ability of the superintendent in success- 
fully bringing sixty-five per cent of the crippled children to the point of self- 
support never cease to interest visitors from all over the world who have 
heard of this hospital school. 

DIVISION OF JUVENILE TRAINING. 

Good visitors have kept the number of institutions for delinquent children at 
three, — Lyman School for Boys at Westborough, Industrial School for Girls 
at Lancaster, and Industrial School for Boys at Shirley — accommodating 
one thousand children committed by the courts for juvenile offenses. But for 
the excellent system of parole and visitation under which three thousand 
children, discharged from the schools after about one year's training, are now 
cared for in their own homes or in boarding or wage homes, several more in- 
stitutions would by tliis time have become necessaiy. Reinforced by the volun- 
tary ser^'ice of the excellent Board of Trustees and especially by the thorough 
knowledge of the boj-s and girls which the superintendents of the schools haver 
acquired, the women parole visitors to the girls and the men parole visitors 
to the boys give a ser\4ce undei-stood by few people in the state. A description 
of it would repeat what has been said of the w^ork of visitors in the Division 
of Child Guardianship, pointing out in addition the special difficulties in 
watching these children from the training schools for lapses back into delin- 
quency. The moral reformation which is begun at the schools is completed 
only by continuous visitation until the children become of age. As an example 
of the way in which the visitors have inspired their charges with an effort to 
play the game squarely again with the community, the children's savings 
accounts now amount to over fifty-two thou'sand dollars. 

ADMINISTRATION. 

Private charitable corporations come under the supervision of the Department 
first at the time of their incorporation and then through annual returns and 
inspections. Three inspectoi*s who have charge of this work have to under- 
stand the character and acti\'ities of over one thousand charitable corporations 
in the state and solve with them many difficulties of policy and management. 
Such supervision demands a high type of intelligence and a great breadth of 
vision in social service. 

Two agents supei'v^ising sixty-eight city and town planning boards have 
the confidence of the boards as guides in carrying out the new preventive 
measures such as zoning and good housing, far-reaching efforts to abolish the 
slums vv'hich foster so many of the evils against which the Department has to 
fight. 

The inspector of public institutions, including one hundred and forty-one 
almshouses, is vvidely knov\Ti as a man Avho has devoted his life to unselfish 
service to people and, thix)ugh his sjTnpathy for his friends of the almshouses^ 
has developed a skill in social service which makes him a much sought for 
adrisor. 

Throughout the divisions and the institutions the workers, whose tasks we 
have described, are aided by corresponding groups of clerks, bookkeepers, and 
stenographers who help with the same fine spirit in the struggle to build up 
the strength of the families and establish the future of children. At Christmas 
time the office Avorkers give of their earnings and of their time to buy toys- 
and dress dolls for Christmas presents for the boys and girls who are under 
the visitors' care. They give unshirking service in an organization which 
makes heavy demands upon their strength. Older clerks have merged their 
lives in the work of the Department. 

SUPERVISORS AND DIRECTORS. 

To guide and inspire the groups of visitors, to supply them with the trainings 
and the experienced control necessary for the successful accomplishment of 



P.D. 17, Part I. 7 

their difficult tasks, the supervisors, assistant directors, and directors, must be 
and are of the very highest standard in ability and unselfish consecration to 
the sei^ic'e of the Commonwealth. Most of them are named in connection 
with their reports which follow in this volume, and their own reports • indicate 
their duties and their interest. 

TRUSTEES AND BOARD MEMBERS. 

State institutions have been brought to their present high point of excellence, 
nationally renowned, by the devotion of employees, superintendents and trus- 
tees. Massachusetts has always believed in encouraging the initiative and 
independence of Boards of Trustees, subject to central supervision. This has 
made the responsibility of trustees for their institutions strong, their interest 
great and their work unsurpassed. They have spent their energies upon the 
proper treatment of patients striving at the same time for an economical 
expenditure of the state's money. Such interest and effort on the part 
of trustees ought to be preserved. Members of the Advisory Board of the 
Department, because of their sagacity, have been of inestimable value to the 
Commonwealth. During the year a former chairman of the Board, whose 
obituary is printed on another page, has died, leaving to the tradition of the 
Department a legacy of intense kindliness. As we honor and value the in- 
tegrity and devotion of our predecessors, may those who are in the service 
today strive to attain equally high standards. 

RICHARD K. CONANT, 

Commissioner. 

DIVISION OF AID AND RELIEF. 

Frank W. Goodhue, Director. 

Subdivision of Settlements. 

Edward F. Morgan^ Supervisor. 

The subdivision of settlements investigates the legal settlement of all persons 
officially called to the attention of the division by overseers of the poor and 
boards of health; investigates the settlement of patients admitted to the State 
Infirmary, State Farm (almshouse department). State sanatoria and the Massa- 
chusetts Hospital school; and supervises public relief rendered in homes and in 
hospitals by cities and towns to persons without legal settlement. The sub- 
division also discharges male inmates of the State Infirmary and the State 
Farm (almshouse depaitment) and visits poor persons supported by cities 
and towns in families. 

The following table is a summary of the w^ork done during the year in the 
examination and investigation of settlements of inmates of the State Insti- 
tutions : • — 









73 




a 


-^ 








3 


5 


't 


E 


Institutions 


"cS 


1 


.2 

a 


<u 


1 


|l 


•• 


.2 


e 


1 


3 
^ 




3 

o 




« 


-H 


t 


o 


i 




w 


o 


w 


z 


o 


H 


State Infirmary 


2,280 


481 


369 


98 


14 


481 


State Farm 


' 


184 


53 


58 


13 


5 


76 


Lakeville State Sanatorium . 




337 


224 


211 


12 




223 


North Reading State Sanatorium 




238 


181 


155 


10 


_ 


165 


Rutland State Sanatorium . 




442 


380 


339 


19 


_ 


358 


Westfield State Sanatorium . 




299 


249 


231 


19 


_ 


250 


Massachusetts Hospital School . 


. 


48 


48 


43 


11 


- 


54 


Totals 


• 


3,828 


1.616 


1,406 


182 


19 


1,607 



Cases pending Nov. 30, 1922, 566. 
Cases pending Nov. 30, 1923, 575. 



S P.D. 17, Part I. 

Supervisioti of Wayfarer's Lodges and Public Lodging Houses. — Under 
the provisions of General Laws, chapter 121, sections 7, 20 and 21, the Depart- 
ment of Public Welfare annually inspects wayfarei's' lodges and pu])lic lodging 
houses where the charge is twenty-five cents per night or less and Avhere ten or 
more beds are pix)vided. 

Wayfarers' lodges are maintained by Boston and Springfield. At both 
houses food and lodging- are given and work at the woodpile is provided, 
jn Springfield the superintendent has endeavore<l to extend assistance to lodgers 
who are ex-service men. 

It is to be noted also that some of the lodging houses conducted by private 
charities are gradually increasing the scope of their social service activities, 
are making; efforts to obtain work for men and women and are taking an 
interest in their future welfare. 

The minimum rate of twenty-five cents per bed is still in force in the 
commercial lodging houses, and it would seem that this is as low a charge as 
can be given if any profit is to be realized. At no time have houses been run 
to their capacity. Their present capacity is probably fifty per cent of the 
pre-war maximum. 

Temporary Aid {G. L., ch. 117, sect. 18). — Cities and towns are authonzed 
by statute to furnish adequate assistance to poor persons having no lawful 
settlements, if so ordered by the Department of Public Welfare. 

On December 1, 1922, there were 1,302 continued cases including 5,361 
persons, and during the year 3,018 notices were received from 193 cities and 
toAvns concerning 14,009 persons. 







Causes of Aid. 










1921 


1922 


1923 




1921 


1922 


1923 


Illness 

Desertion .... 
Widowhood .... 

Old age 

Unemployment 
Insufficient income 
Husband in House of Correc- 
tion 

^ 


789 

322 

154 

13 

3,527 

1,589 

91 


947 
295 
136 
37 
1,890 
987 

134 


1,070 
359 
205 
69 
829 
249 

143 


Orphans .... 
Insanity .... 
Blindness .... 
Non-support 
Miscellaneous 

Totals .... 


. 11 
14 

4 
14 
8 


16 
16 
3 
17 

7 


12 

24 

6 

47 
5 


6.536 


4,485 


3,018 



The above tabulation indicates a continued improvement in industrial con- 
ditions, and the number of cases has steadily decreased notwithstanding the 
increase in the cost of living. 

Since the enactment of the amendment to the temporaiy aid law (Chap. 331, 
Acts of 1912) the standard of care has been gradually improved and has kept 
pace Avith the constantly increasing demands for more adequate consideration 
of the problems of the unfortunate. 

The agitation for old age pensions has also increased the demand for public 
support of aged persons in the community. 

The amounts annually appropriated by the Legislature are necessarily for 
current and previous years. The following tabulation shows the actual amounts 
reimbursed for aid rendered by cities and towns during the years designated : — 



Year 


Number of 
Cases 


Number 

of Persons in 

Families 


Amounts 
reimbursed 


1912 ; . 

1913 

1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

1919 

1920 

1921 

1922 


2,847 
3,131 
4,848 
7,305 
5,165 
5,664 
4,358 
3,756 
3,223 
8,093 
6,472 


12,339 
13,434 
20,714 
32,056 
21,043 
22,258 
17,701 
15,668 
13,313 
32,372 
29,124 


$48,192 85 
63,203 05 
108,337 29 
178,611 62 
159,205 53 
227,762 71 
260,877 14 
309,588 83 
330,959 61 
606,181 73 
501,638 16 



P.D. 17, Part I. .9 

The amount reimbursed for aid rendered in 1923 ($47,712.91) is not in- 
cluded in the above tabulation as the claims for the last six months of the year 
are not received until after the close of the fiscal year, as proxdded by Chapter 
122, Section 19, General Laws. 

Shipwrecked Seamen {G. L., cli. 102, sect. 5). — During the year the only 
notice received was from Chatham and included 10 pei"sons. 

Sick State Poor {G. L., cli. 122, sects. 17, 18). — The sick law provides 
that no person shall be sent to the State Infii-mary whose health would be 
endangered by removal. 

Cities and towns are reimbursed for the support of persons ha^4ng no legal 
settlement who are~ ill in their homes or in public or privately controlled 
hospitals, infirmaries, or institutions for the deaf, dumb, or blind, provided 
such persons are not in suitable condition for removal to the State Infirmai-y 
when applying for assistance. 

On December 1, 1922 there were 199 continued cases, and during the year 
notices were received from 107 cities and towns concerning 5,724 persons repre- 
sented as too ill to be removed. 

Dangerous Diseases (G. L., cli. Ill, sect. 116). — The law provides that a 
board of health shall retain charge, to the exclusion of the overseers of the 
poor, of any person ill with a disease defined by the Department of Public 
Health as dangerous to the public health. 

If any member of a family is ill with a disease declared dangerous to the 
public health, the aid required by the other members of the family is fur- 
nished by the overseers of the poor, unless the family is quarantined as pro- 
vided in chapter 111, section 95, General Laws, in which event the board of 
health furnishes all aid required. 

In hospital cases reimbursement by the commonwealth is governed by the 
provisions of chapter 122, section 18, General Laws. 

On December 1, 1922 there were 271 continued cases, and during the year 
notices were received from the boards of health of 100 cities and to^^Tis con- 
cerning 2,516 pei"sons ill Avitli diseases declared dangerous to the public 
health. 

Wife-settlement {G. L., ch. 122, sect. 12). — T\ie law pro^-ides that "If 
a state pauper has a -wife who is also a pauper ha^'ing a legal settlement 
in the commonwealth he shall be supported by the town where his wife has 
her settlement." 

On December 1, 1922, there were 87 continued eases, and during the year 
176 notices were received from 31 cities and towns. 

Burials {G. L., ch. 117, sect. 17, as amended by chap. 298, Acts of 1923). — 
The law as amended became operative Jufy 23, 1923 and provides that if the 
expense of burial is not paid by kindred, — "An amount not exceeding $40 
for the funeral expenses of each pauper over 12 j-ears of age, and not exceed- 
ing $20 for the funeral expenses of each pauper under that age, shall be paid 
by the Commonwealth; pro\ided, that the overseers shall file with each claim 
an affida\'it of the undertaker stating the total amount of his bill, the amount 
received from the town, and the amount received from all other sources, and 
provided, further, that if the total expense of the burial, by whomsoever in- 
cuiTed, shall exceed the sum of $100 no pa\Tnent therefor shall be made by 
the commonwealth." 

The number of burial claims received during the year was 403 from 46 cities 
and towns. 

Audit. — The number, amount, and allowance of the bills examined on 
account of cases of temporary aid, sick state poor, dangerous disea.-;es, wife- 
settlement, burial, and mothers with dependent children are shown in the 
folloAdng tabulation. It is to be noted that the total shown in this table may 
vary somewhat from the total paid out of the Treasury during the fiscal year 
from the appropriation in question. Tliis possible variance arises from the 
fact that bills audited by thus Department are in some cases not actually paid 
during the year for which the audit is shown. For actual expenditures from 
these respective appropriations see pages 60-63. 



la 






P.D. 


17, Part I. 


Classes of Cases 


Bills 


Claims 


Allowance 


Deductions 


Temporary Aid 

Sick State Poor 

Dangerous Diseases 

Wife Settlement 

Burials 

Mothers with Dependent Children 


4.001 
3.449 
1,564 
349 
242 
6,461 


$477,631 07 

91,386 01 

135,559 03 

12,376 02 

5,309 46 

923,192 20 


$449,999 29 

73,384 02 

119,999 16 

11,615 11 

4,498 96 

899,999 43 


$27,631 78 

18.001 99 

15.559 87 

760 91 

810 50 

23,192 77 




16,066 


$1,645,453 79 


$1,559,495 97 


$85,957 82 



Bemoi^als. — The Department is charged with the duty of removing sane 
paupers to cities and towns ^vithin the State, or, when not belonging in 
Massachusetts to the State or place where they belong. The following table- 
shows the removals made during the year : — 





1921 


1922 


1923 


To other countries 

To other States 

To towns of residence 


134 

262 

1,254 


135 

198 

1,648 


67 

161 

1,163 




1,650 


1,981 


1,391 



Subdivision of Mothers' Aid. 

Mrs. Elizabeth F. Moloney^ Supervisor. 

Ten Years op Mothers^ Aid in Massachusetts. 

The Massachusetts Mothers' Aid Law w^ent into effect September 1, 1913, 
During the ten years that have since elapsed we have passed through the 
great World War, ^ith a critical period of business depression and un- 
employment that followed in its wake. The cost of living rose rapidly from 
July, 1913, up to December, 1920, w^hen it reached its peak, but in September, 
]923, it was still 58% higher than it was in 1913. The influenza epidemic of 
1919 cost the lives of hundreds of fathers of families which became dependent 
in consequence. In tracing the history of Mothers' Aid in Massachusetts, and 
especially in counting its cost, these facts must be kept in mind. 

The ;^Iothers' Aid Law aimed to prevent the breaking up of homes because 
of the death or incapacity of fathers by providing adequate aid for needy 
mothers capable of bringing up tiieir dependent children. An average of 
about 3,000 families per year has thus been maintained in their own homes 
during the past decade. 

Within the first three months, 1,303 cases were reported; the number w^as 
more than doubled during the next twelve months. Thereafter there w^as a 
steady increase in the number of active cases reported at the beginning of 
each succeeding fiscal year until the peak was reached in 1919. The World 
War (1914 to 1918), the influenza epidemic (1918-1919), unemployment and 
the high cost of li\dng were causes that combined to make the total number of 
active cases in 1919 soar close to the 3,800 mark. Since then the numbers 
have gradually dropped until December 1, 1923, when there w^ere 3,072 active 
Mothers' Aid cases. 

The following table show^s the number of Mothers' Aid cases on December 1 
of each year: 



December 1, 1913 


. 1,303 


December 1, 


1919 


. 3,793 


December 1, 1914 


. 2,664 


December 1, 


1920 


. 3,300 


December 1, 1915 


. 2,798 


December 1, 


1921 


. 3,407 


December 1, 1916 


. 3,035 


December 1, 


1922 


. 3,371 


December 1, 1917 


. 3,242 


December 1, 


1923 


. 3,072 


December 1, 1918 


. 3,366 









P.D. 17, Part I. 11 

Pre\4ous to 1912 public aid in Massachusetts tended to be a mere dole, 
limited by statute in state cases to $2 per week in the Ax-inter months. 
Chapter 331 of the Acts of 1912 allowed for larger grants in state cases, 
" if so ordered by the State Board of Charity ". 

The Mothers' Aid Law of 1913 was a new departure in public relief inas- 
much as it specifically required adequate aid " sufficient to enable the mothers 
to bring up their children properly in their own homes ". It emphasized the 
larger aspects of relief, — health, housing, education, recreation, and character 
development — as distinguished from the old system of indiscriminate alms- 
giving. 

Up to this time state supen-ision of public relief in their homes was limited 
to cases without legal settlement called " state cases ". Under the new law 
state super\asion was extended to all ^Mothers' Aid cases, regardless of legal 
settlement, the State agreeing to reimburse cities and towns for one-third of 
the aid in every' approved Mothers' Aid case, and for the total amount of aid 
in State cases. In 1913 settled cases outnumbered State cases seven to one; 
in 1923 the proportion was five to one. 

In 1913 family budget standards as applied to public relief were prac- 
tically unknown. The first attempt of public relieving officers to measure 
scientifically the weekly needs of a given family in terms of rent, fuel, food 
and clothing, was made by the State Board of Charity in 1914. After con- 
sultation and coiTespondence ^vith many public and private relief agencies 
all over the country a standard budget guide or " rule of thumb " was adopted. 
It has been re^'ised several times in the past ten j'ears and it is still in use in 
Mothers' Aid cases. 

During the "War, when food and fuel conser^-ation became a national neces- 
sity, both the Federal Government and the State of Massachusetts made ex- 
haustive studies of food and fuel values, of clothing costs, rent and sundries. 
They issued monthly bulletins dealing ^dth the cost of living which were of 
immense value and which stirred a nation-wide interest in the subject of family 
living costs. 

During the War and for a long time after it the building of new houses 
was practically abandoned because of the high cost of labor and the scarcity 
of building materials. This created a housing shortage which is still acute. 
Rent profiteering, though curbed by legislation and prosecuted by the rent 
committee of the Commission on Xecessaiies of Life, is still practiced by 
unscrupulous house o^nei's. Rents have doubled and tripled ^^^thin the past 
ten years and there is no present indication of a solution of the housing 
problem. 

It is ob\-iously unfair to young children and detrimental to the health and 
morals of a family to allow it to remain in a crowded, unsanitary tenement 
without proper sleeping and li^-ing rooms; yet, many foreign born mothers 
prefer to put up with poor housing conditions rather than move away from 
relatives or friends who speak their own language. The mother's preference 
should not be the sole deteimining factor in the selection of a home for 
children who are supported wholly or in part by public funds. Indeed, 
it is a waste of public money to finance the plan of a mother who prefers 
to live in an unsanitary home. We have, therefore, insisted upon better 
housing for Mothers' Aid families, even going so far as to decline to reim- 
burse for cases where the mothers refuse to move into better available tene- 
ments. 

A small ecjuity in the house in which the family lives is a great advantage. 
It insures a more permanent and usually a better home for the family than a 
tenement which could be hired at equally small expense. With the taxes 
al^ated, and pajTnents reducing the mortgage eliminated, — sometimes with 
a regular income from the rental of an extra room — housing costs may be 
reduced to a minimum. 

Good case work demands attention to the health needs of a family. Under 
the Mothers' Aid Law free medical aid in her home or in the hospital is 



12 P.D. 17, Part I. 

available for the mother and her dependent children. Ovei-seers of the Poor 
are urged to have every mother and her dependent children examined as soon 
as the mother applies for aid. This is especially impoi^iant in families where 
the fatlier has died of tuberculosis or -where he is known to be suffering from 
general paresis due to venereal disease. 

Overseere arrange for pre-natal care for an expectant mother and provide 
hospital care or home nursing for her. If she goes to a hospital the Ovei*seers 
arrange for the care of her young children by relatives if any are able to help. 
They provide convalescent care when necessary. They furnish traveling ex- 
penses if the patient must go to a distant hospital of to a specialist for 
expert advice. They pay for glasses, teeth, braces, special shoes, etc., when 
ordered by a doctor. 

Prevention of disease rather than cure is the modern health motto. With 
this in mind Ovei'seei's should see to it that children of tubercular parents or 
those who are underweight have extra nourishment. 

The fact that several Boards have changed the name " Overseers of the 
Poor " to ^' Ovei*seei*s of the Public Welfare " is worthy of comment as indi- 
cating a finer and broader conception of their duties. 

The Mothers' Aid Law requires the Overseers of the Poor to visit the 
home of each mother aided at least once every three months and to submit a 
detailed A\Titten report of each such visit to the State Department of Public 
Welfare. Many Boards of Overseers, especially those in the larger cities, 
have l>een obliged to employ additional field agents to make these quarterly 
visits. Massachusetts civil service rules require visitors to pass an examination 
and to submit proof of a minimum amount of training and experience in 
family case work as an important part of the examination. As a result, 
trained visitors, many of them women, are now employed in most of the large 
cities. Boston, Worcester, Springfield, HolVoke, Lawrence, New Bedford, 
Haverhill and Cambridge all employ women visitors for Mothers' Aid cases. 

While it is true that in the past decade great improvement has been made 
in the Mothers' Aid work, there is still room for further improvement. First 
investigations should be more thorough and painstaking; dates of births, 
deaths and marriages should be verified; property facts should be cheeked up 
at the office of the Assessors and at the Registry of Deeds; bank accounts and 
insurance moneys should be traced and wages of working members of the 
family should be verified at regular intervals. The time to seek help from 
relatives, societies and friends is before aid is granted. The time to impose 
conditions is before aid is given. 

Failure to live up to reasonable standards of cleanliness should not be 
tolerated. The mother who will not keep her home and her children clean 
and who is lax in discipline or a poor manager is not the type of mother for 
whom this laAv is meant to pro\nde. 

There is room for improvement in the follow-up of Mothers' Aid families. 
After aid has been granted, more frequent visits to the home, consultation with 
school teachers as to the attendance, deportment and scholarship of children of 
school age, and investigation of the earnings of children of working age should 
be the iiile. Overseers should cooperate with private charities and call upon 
private funds and scholarships which are available in their communities. 

Statistics. 

At the beginning of the fiscal year (on December 1, 1922) there were 3,371 
mothers with 10,285 dependent children under fourteen years of age receiving 
Mothers' Aid. 

During the year 727 new cases were aided and 1,026 cases were closed, so 
that there were 3,072 mothers in receipt of Mothers' Aid at the close of the 
fiscal year (November 30, 1923). 

On December 1, 1922, the 3,371 mothers with 10,285 dependent children 
were classified as follows : — 



P.D. 17, Part I. 13 

A. Classified as to legal settlement: 

1. Without legal settlement: 

558 mothers with 1,588 dependent children. 

2. With a legal settlement: 

2,813 mothers with 8,697 dependent children. 

B. Classified as to widowhood: 

1. Widows: 

2,682 mothers with 8,199 dependent children. 

2. Not widows: 

689 mothers with 2,086 dependent children. 

Note. — The living husbands of mothers were classified as follows: 

419 were totally incapacitated (96 were insane, 323 had chronic 
illness; of the latter number 136 had tuberculosis and 187 had 
diseases other than tuberculosis). 
217 were deserting husbands. 
23 were divorced or legally separated. 
30 were in jail. 

The new eases that were received during the fiscal year included 727 mothers 
with 2,423 dependent children, and were classified as follows : — 

A. Classified as to legal settlement: 

1. Without legal settlement: 

99 mothers with 317 dependent children. 

2. With a legal settlement: 

628 mothers with 2,106 dependent children. 

B. Classified as to widowhood: 

1. Widows: 

476 mothers with 1,552 dependent children. 

2. Not widows: 

251 mothers w^ith 871 dependent children. 

Note. — The living husbands of the 251 mothers were classified as follows: — 
151 were totally incapacitated (27 were insane, 124 had chronic 
illness; of the latter number, 71 had tuberculosis and 53 had 
diseases other than tuberculosis). 
66 were deserting husbands. 

9 were divorced or legally separated. 
25 were in jail. 

Of the 727 new Mothers' Aid cases entered last year 159 were re-opened 
cases as follows: 



Family removed from one town to another 

Insufficient income 

Cash in excess of S200 expended 

Husband unable to work 

Husband returned to hospital 

Husband deserted 

Husband died .... 

Husband in jail . 

Woman re-married and second husband died . 

Illness of mother or children who were employed 

Mother to give up employment 

Home re-established ..... 

Male lodgers removed ..... 

Housing conditions improved 

Transfer from aid under regular relief statutes 

Ineligible to Soldiers' Relief .... 

Re-consideration as to eligibility 

Re-consideration under real estate policy 

Marriage intentions cancelled 



61 

8 
15 
5 
11 
2 
4 
1 
4 
23 
1 
9 
1 
1 
3 
1 
4 
4 
1 



Total 159 



Beasons for closing Mothers' Aid Cases. 
Sufficient income .... 
Applicant remarried 
Family moved .... 
Husband resumed support of family 
Non-conformity with policies 
Youngest child 14 years of age 
Unfitness of mother 
Transferred to other sources of relief 
Applicant died .... 
Application withdrawn 



467 
117 
97 
63 
103 
37 
34 
18 
14 
20 



14 

Disbandment of home 
Applicant in hospital 
One dependent child 
Unsuitable housing 
Miscellaneous 



P.D. 17, Part I. 

16 

12 

5 

8 

15 



1,026 



Duration of Mothers' Aid Cases closed between December 1, 1922, and 



No'v ember 30, 



Less than 1 year . 
Less than 2 years 
Less than 3 years 
Less than 4 years 
Less than 5 years 
Less than 6 years 
Less than 7 years 
Less than S years 
Less than 9 years 
Less than 10 years 
Ten years 



923. 



242 

156 

111 

95 

150 

80 

54 

43 

39 

50 

6 

1,026 



Mothers' Aid Appropriation by the Massachusetts Legislature. 

(For reimbursement puiposes.) 

Sept. 1, 1913 to Nov. 30, 1914, State appropriation of S175,000 

Dec. 1, 1914 to Nov. 30, 1915, State appropriation of 250,000 

Dec. 1, 1915 to Nov. 30, 1916, State appropriation of 300,000 

Dec. 1, 1916 to Nov. 30, 1917, State appropriation of 400,000 

Dec. 1, 1917 to Nov. 30, 1918, State appropriation of 475,000 

Dec. 1, 1918 to Nov. 30, 1919, State appropriation of 550,000 

Dec. 1, 1919 to Nov. 30, 1920, State appropriation of 775,000 

Dec. 1, 1920 to Nov. 30, 1921, State appropriation of 900,000 

Dec. 1, 1921 to Nov. 30, 1922, State appropriation of 850,000 

Dec. 1, 1922 to Nov. 30, 1923, State appropriation of 900,000 

Subdivision of Social Service. 

Miss Flora E. Burtox^ Supervisor. 

The number of women and children admitted to the State Infirmary this 
year has decreased to 577, — 204 less than last year. This decrease is due to the 
opening of the Bradford Infiiinary for the children who are wards of the 
Di\dsion of Child Guardianship, and to the opening of the State School for 
the Feeble-Minded at Belehertown. The number of children at the State 
Infirmaiy has decreased 50% in the last year. Only 62 children were admitted 
to the State Infii-mary from the Division of Child Guardianship, and they were 
either feeble-minded or afflicted with chronic diseases. This decrease is a 
great satisfaction to those who have labored long for other accommodations 
for children. The discharges have increased because of the great number of 
children transferred to the schools for the feeble-minded, — 191 in all, an 
accumulation of years. These two facts are epochs in the history of the 
State Infirmary. 

This year has been an extremely hard one for supervision and placement of 
women and children discharged from the State Infirmary. The young women 
in our care have been particularly difficult to rehabilitate because they have 
been inferior physically and defective morally. Many replacements have been 
necessary and opportunities for work have been few in number. The general 
increase of unemployment has caused much hardship to the handicapped 
persons, to mothers with babies and to middle-aged women. Because of this, 
we have been obliged to board our mothers and their children either at the 
Chardon Street Home or in a private family pending the finding of suitable 
positions. 

In behalf of the Chardon Street Home, we wish to say that the matrons 



P.D. 17, Part L 15 

are so kindly and initelligent that, even with its antiquated equipment, we find 
our women very happy and well cared for. 

There has been an increase in the number of applicants coming directly to 
the office, some without even a possibility of their admission to the State In- 
fii-mary. This subdivision serves as a bureau of information and advice, 
rendering much service which is not recorded but which takes hours from our 
regular work. Overseers of the Poor and hospitals are constantly asking 
advice as to the disposition of chronic sick children. We are endeavoring to 
keep all children out of the State Infirmary, believing that there are plenty of 
hospitals for children in the community. Howe r, the tubercular ward at 
the State Infirmary is the only hospital in th^ ^^^'ate for the tubercular child 
under three, and the sun and lamp treatments i -j have become famous for 
their wonderful results. Many applications to tnis office are for the super- 
vision of the older unmarried mother, and apparently there is no other agency 
in the State giving care to this group. It is very hard to refuse such cases, 
but our visitors have a limit of endurance. We refuse cases which are settled 
in large cities and to-wns Avhere there are social agencies doing case work. 
Such communities must learn to meet this kind of social problem wisely, and the 
State does not help by bearing local responsibilities. We are always glad to 
help the towns where resources are few. 

The many new wards at the State Infirmary have at last made possible the 
proper segregation and classification of patients at the institution. In small 
wards for selected groups of patients much more individual attention can now 
be given than has been possible in the past. Additional wards have been 
made vacant by the transfer of feeble-minded children to schools for the 
feeble-minded. The children now in our wards are either those who have 
chronic illnesses which cannot be cared for in other hospitals or those who are 
feeble-minded under six years of age who must be retained at the Infirmary 
until the schools for the feeble-minded provide wards for them. No children 
are sent to the Infirmary without permission from this office. 



Women and Children admitted to the State Infirmary during Year ending 

November 30, 1923. 



Ages at Admission. 



Under 1 
1 to 8 
9 to 16 
17 to 21 
Over 21 



Sources from which received: 
Under 1 : 

Overseers of the Poor 
Division of Child Guardianship 



to 8: 

Overseers of the Poor 
Division of Child Guardianship 
Industrial School for Girls 



9 to 16: 

Overseers of the Poor 
Division of Child Guardianship 
Board of Health .... 
Massachusetts School for Feeble- 
minded, Waverley 
Lyman School for Boys . 
Industrial School for Girls 



27 
66 

87 
104 
293 

577 



26 
1 

27 

54 

11 

1 

66 

35 
40 

4 

1 

1 
6 

87 



Ages at Admission — Con. 
17 to 21: 

Overseers of the Poor 
Division of Child Guardianship 
Wrentham State School , 
Massachusetts School for Feeble- 
minded, Waverley 
Industrial School for Girls 
Board of Health 
Reformatory for Women 
Massachusetts Hospital School 
Lyman School for Boys . 



Over 21 : 

Overseers of the Poor 
Court .... 
Industrial School for Girls 
Belchertown State School 
Wrentham State School . 
Massachusetts Hospital School 
Reformatory for Women 



Total 



58 

10 

1 

1 
18 
5 
5 
1 
5 

104 



277 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 



293 
577 



16 

Diseases at Admission. 
Under 1 : 

Miscellaneous diseases . 
Syphilis .... 

No disease .... 



to 8: 

Miscellaneous diseases 

Tuberculosis 

Idiocy . . . 

Mental observation 

Feeble-mindedness 

No disease 



9 to 16: 

Miscellaneous diseases 

Tuberculosis 

Pregnancy 

Pregnancy and gonorrhea 

Pregnancy and syphilis 

Gonorrhea 

Syphilis 

Feeble-mindedness 

No disease 



21 

1 
5 

27 

29 

2 

2 

3 

10 

20 

66 

19 
4 
9 
1 
2 
5 
7 
30 
10 



P.D. 17, Part I. 


Diseases at Admission — Con. 




16 to 21: 




Miscellaneous diseases . 


15 


Tuberculosis 


11 


Feeble-mindedness 


11 


Prefj nancy .... 


34 


Pregnancy and gonorrhea 


5 


Mental observation 


4 


Gonorrhea .... 


5 


Syphilis .... 


17 


No disease .... 


1 




104 


Over 21: 




Miscellaneous diseases . 


111 


Tuberculosis 


16 


Feol)le-mindedness 


6 


Mental observation 


20 


Pregnancy .... 


54 


Pregnancy and gonorrhea 


4 


Arteriosclerosis 


54 


Gonorrhea .... 


4 


Syphilis .... 


17 


Idiocy ..... 


1 


No disease ..... 


6 



Total 



Births (illegitimate, 96), 107. 
Deaths. 97. 



Discharges to — 

Mass. School for Feeble-minded 

Waverley .... 
Wrentham State School . 
Belchertown State School 
Department of Mental Diseases 
Place of Settlemert (10 children) 
Division of Child Guardianship 
Girls' Parole Branch (16 women 

with 10 children) 
Boys' Parole Branch 
Industrial School for Boys 
* Reformatory for "Women (13 women 

with 10 children) 
Insane Ward (commitments) . 
Board of Health . 
Court (2 children) . 



101 

69 

21 

1 

41 

124 

26 

2 
2 

23 

17 

1 

13 



293 
. 577 



Private Agencies .... 


8 


Other States .... 


2 


Other Countries .... 


4 


U. S. Immigration Commission (10 




women with 4 children) 


14 


Parents ..... 


47 


Relatives ..... 


57 


Husbands (20 women with 13 chil- 




dren) ..... 


33 


Friends ..... 


21 


Emplo^Tnent .... 


61 


Employment with child (39 chil- 




dren) ..... 


78 


Absconded . 


25 



791 



Summary of Placement Work. 



Persons under active supervision Nov. 

30, 1923 

108 mothers with 108 babies . 
Mothers boarding babies 
Women and children under 

supervision 
Girls in institutions temporarily 
Visits to girls in own homes 
Visits to girls at employment 



216 
41 



143 

10 



410 



65 
253 



Visits to girls elsewhere' . . .511 

Visits to girls in Out-Patient Dept. of 

Hospitals 227 

Visits for investigation . . . 254 

Replacements ..... 154 
Marriages ..... 14 

Transportation cases ... 30 

Forty-eight Savings Accounts for girls, 

total .... $2,680 98 



General Summary. 

Women and children admitted to the State Infirmary 
Births at the State Infirmary ..... 

Women and children discharged from the State Infirmary 
Deaths at the State Infirmary ..... 

Women and children discharged direct to other Departments 

Women and children discharged by the Social Service Division 
Applications at office ....... 

Persons under supervision Nov. 30, 1923 

Total number[assisted by Subdivision of Social Service during year ending N 



577 
107 
791 
97 
352 

439 

76 

410 



ov. 30, 1923 925 



P.D. 17, Part I. 



Court Work. 



Warrants on bastardy complaint .... 

Cases appealed to Superior Court .... 

Adjudications of paternity ..... 

Agreements for support of illegitimate children 
Lump sum settlements for support of illegitimate children 
Warrants for abandonment of children . 
Guardianship of child ...... 

Adoption of children ...... 

Commitment to Feeble-minded Schools . 
Money collected for support of illegitimate children 
Money paid out for support of illegitimate children 
Number of accounts for illegitimate children . 
Balance on hand for illegitimate children, Nov. 30, 1923 



17 



24 

5 

15 

1 

1 

4 

1 

3 

16 

$6,064 00 

4,628 87 

63 

S9,075 66 



DIVISION OF CHILD GUARDIANSHIP. 

James E. Fee^ Director. 
Children in Care and Custody of the Division. 

At the beginning of the last year, December 1st, 1922, there were 6,127 
children in the care and custody of the Division of Child Guardianship, 261 
delinquent, 28 wayA\iard, 3,089 neglected and 2,749 dependent. During the year 
828 children were received, viz. : 89 delinquent, 6 wayward, 371 neglected and 
362 dependent. The total number cared for during the year was 6,955. After 
discharging 1,405, viz. : 173 delinquent, 12 wayward, 716 neglected and 504 
dependent, there remained in charge of the Division -at the close of the year, 
November 30, 1923, 5,550 children classified as 177 delinquent, 22 wayward, 
2,744 neglected and 2,607 dependent. 

Five thousand two hundred twelve (5,212) of the 5,550 children under care 
November 30, 1923 were over three years of age and cared for as follows : — 
in places receiving wages, 765; in places free of expense to State, 604; in 
places partly supported by State, 277; in places fully supported by State, 
3,123; at the State Infirmary and other institutions not correctional, subject 
to care and treatment, 230; in United States Service, 67; married, 46; 
whereabouts unknown, 100. 

Three hundred thirty-eight (338) children in the total under care November 
30th, 1923, who were under three years of age, were classified as follows : — 
in homes free of expense, 17; in homes fully supported by State, 306; in 
hospitals, subject to supervision and care, 15.^ 

Children under Three Years of Age. 

The number of infants or children Under three years of age in charge of 
this Division at the beginning of the year, December 1, 1922, was 390; during 
the year 226 were received and 278 were discharged, making the whole number 
supported 616, and the number remaining on November 30, 1923, 338 infants. 

Sixty- nine (69) of the 226 infants received Avere committed by the Courts 
under provisions of section 42, chapter 119 of the General Laws; 35 were 
committed by the Overseers of the Poor and 5 by the Superintendent of the 
State Infirmary under the provisions of section 22, chapter 119 of the General 
Laws and of this group 6 were foundlings; 112 were received under provisions 
of section 38 of chapter 119 and 4 were removed from unsuitable boarding 
places under the provisions of section 28 of chapter 119, which provides that 
a designated officer of the Department may remove to the custody of the 
Department any child under the age of seven years if such removal is neces- 
sary for the protection of the child. All of these infants were in an almost 

1 In addition to these 5,550 children, the Department had under its supervision and visitation November 
30, 1923, 450 boys at the Lyman School for Beys; 244 girls at the Industrial School for Girls; 224 boys at the 
Industrial School for Boys; 2,728 boys and 466 girls in the custody of the Trustees of the Massachusetts 
Training Schools, outside the schools; 97 boys and 87 girls, patients at the Massachusetts Hospital School; 
and 136 children, patients at the State Infirmary, who are either young infants with their mothers, or else 
under hospital treatment, making approximately a total of 10,638 children in the rare and custody or under 
the supervision of the Department. There were also 1,336 children supported at the expense of cities and 
towns who were subject to the Department's visitation reported upon at page 56. 



18 P.D. 17, Part I. 

hopeless condition when removed but they improved in suitable surroundings 
and they finally recovered. 

Eleven of the 616 infants supported were legally adopted; 162, having 
reached the age of three yeai*s, -were transferred to the sub-division for older 
children; 69 were discharged to parents or relatives; 4 Avere discharged to 
places of settlement ; 1 was released on bail ; 11 were discharged to court ; 
and 20 died. Seventeen of the remaining 338 infants were placed in homes 
without expense to the State. 

Four visiting nurses made 6,770 visits. Included in this number are 6,338 
Tisits to infants and 441 visits of investigation of prospective boarding homes 
for infants and homes in Avhich infants are boarded privately. 

Our physician reported 1,687 physical examinations. This number includes 
•the first examination which is always given on admission and such re-examina- 
tions as necessity requires. These examinations are usually made at the 
Kuisery, which is the receiving station for children under three years of age. 
Two hundred fifty (250) infants received temporary care at the Nursery during 
the year. 

The percentage of mortality for the whole number of infants supported 
was 3.2% — four died at the State Infirmary, eleven in local hospitals and five 
in foster homes. 

One hundred six (106) of the 616 infants supported were under one year 
of age. Nine (9) of this number died, making the percentage of deaths for 
infants under one vear 8.5%. 



Fi th to one year 
One jear to two years 
Two years to three years 



Mortality Bate. 



9 or 8.5% 
3 or 1.1% 
8 or 3.2% 



Details of Mortality of Infants under One Year of Age. 



Placed in Hospitals. 



Under Care 



Length of Time 
in Hospital 



Age at Death 



Cause of Death 



3 months 

2 weeks 

3 mos. 3 wks. 
3 months 

7 months 



1 month 
13 days . 
3 mos. 2 wks. 
1 day . 
7 months 



4? months . 

7 months 6 days . 

8 mos. 1 week 

9 mos. 3 weeks . 
9 mos. 3 weeks . 



Malnutrition. 
Pneumonia. 
Pneumonia. 
Pneumonia. 
Congenital syphilis. 



Boarded in Private Families. 





Under Care 


Age at Time of Death 


Cause of Death 


A . . . . 
B . . . . 
C . . . . 
D . . . 


25 days . 
3 months 
1 month . 
8 months 27 daj'S . 


1 month 29 days . 

6 months 2 weeks 

7 months 4 days . 

1 year 


Enterocolitis. 

Bronchitis and Whooping Cough. 
Congenital Hydrocephalus. 
Whooping Cough and Measles. 



Details of Mortality of Infants between One and Three Years. 

Placed in Hospitals. 



Under Care 



Length of Time 
in Hospital 



Age at Death 



Cause of Death 



4 mos. 3 wks. 
3 months 
2^ months 
2 months 

2 mos. 3 wks. 

3 mos. 1 wk. . 
13 mos. 3 wks. 
8 mos. 3 wks. 
16 months 

5^ months 



4 days . 

3 months 
2J months 

4 days . 
1 day 

3 mos. 1 wk. 
3 days . 
1 month 
3 mos. 3 wks. 
9 days . 



14 months . 
1.5 months . 

17 months . 

18 months . 
20 months . 
20i months . 
2U months . 

2 yrs. 2 months 

2^ years 

2 yrs. 7h mos. 



Whooping Cough. 

Congenital syphilis & Ga-stroenteritis 

Birth paralysis and enterocolitis. 

Meningitis. 

Stricture of oesophagus. 

Tuberculosis of lungs. 

Meningitis. 

Diphtheria and pneumonia. 

Tuberculosis miliary. 

Pneumonia. 



P.D. 17, Part I. 



Boarded in Private Families. 



19 





Under Care 


Age at Time of Death 


Cause of Death 


A . . . . 10§ months . 


13 months 3 weeks 


Cholera infantum. 



Cblildren over Three Years of Age. 

There Avere 5,737 children between the ages of three and twenty-one years 
of age under care December 1, 1922. During the year were added 764, of whom 
602 were new cases and 162 transferred from the subdivision for infants; 
23 died; 230 became of age; 49 were adopted; 48 were sent to correctional 
institutions; 7 were discharged to place of settlement, 461 to the Department 
of Mental Diseases, and 471 otherwise discharged, — leaving 5,212 — 2,851 
boys and 2,361 girls under care November 30, 1923. The decrease in popula- 
tion was 525 or 9.1%. 

Forty-six (46) visitors made 23,605 visits to children in foster homes. In 
addition to this number, 1,381 children supported by cities and towns were 
visited in accordance with the provisions of section 16, chapter 121 of the 
General Laws. 

The average number of children assigned to each visitor is too large to 
warrant the good results we aim to secure. In spite of this condition, we have 
been successful in obtaining for our boys and girls many opportunities which 
assist them in becoming good self-supporting citizens. 

Nine hundred fifty-two (952) boys and girls over fourteen years of age are 
attending school, and 285, or 33%, of this number are practically no expense 
to the State; 34 boys and 99 girls in return for services rendered, receive a 
weekly wage in addition to school opportunities; 70 boys and 57 girls are in 
free school homes, and 25 are on parole or visiting with parents under our 
supervision; 225 others are in homes where free board is furnished but with 
assistance given by the State in supplying suitable clothing; board and cloth- 
ing are provided for 230 boys and 212 girls in this group : 

At School — Over 14 Years of Age. 



Boys 



Girls 



Attending — 

Grammar School 

Junior High School 

High School 

Normal School 

Trades School 

Business School 

College 

Evening School 

Under following conditions — 
Receiving wages — free of expense to Department 

Free of expense 

Partly free (clothing only provided) . 

On parole with parents 

Board and clothing provided .... 



235 


157 


30 


70 


108 


258 


_ 


6 


15 


16 


2 


1 


5 


2 


18 


29 


413 


539 


34 


99 


70 


57 


67 


158 


12 


13 


230 


212 



413 



539 



Those who have left school have been directed in their choice of emplojTnent, 
and many forms of occupation are represented by the 478 boys and 322 girls 
who are self-supporting. Among the boys, the largest number, 179, is found in 
mills and factories, while 164 continue on farms, 29 are in offices, 22 are in 
stores and shops, and the remainder are employed in the various trades with 
carpenters, plumbers, printers, etc. 

Factory work as a means of livelihood has not proven as attractive to the 
girls, as only 53 are employed in mills and factories. The largest group, 187, 



20 P.D. 17, Part I. 

are engaged in domestic service, and 45 in offices. Hospital training for 
nui*sing is the choice of 15 girls; 3 others are employed in hospitals as 
attendants; 3 are nurse-maids; 10 are in stores and shops; 4 girls, having 
completed the required courses at Normal School or College, are teaching 
school. All these girls are retjuired to save a portion of their earnings, and 
during the year bank deposits to the amount of $10,797.64 have been made by 
this group. 

Before commitment by the courts of a child against whom complaint of 
neglect or delinquency has been made, the law provides that notice of such 
complaint be sent to this Depailment in order that an agent may attend the 
hearing and protect the interests of the child. Fifteen (15) men visitors in 
this Division attended 8,005 court cases last year. 

Our women visitors are required to attend all courts in Avhich no woman pro- 
bation officer is employed to hear charges brought against any girl. This work 
involves much time and thought. When sufficient notice is given an investiga- 
tion is made before the date of the hearing. 

Women visitors attended in all 216 cases this year. One hundred three (103) 
required more than one hearing to detennine final disposition so that only 113 
were actually new cases. 

The specitic charges were as follows: 



Stubbornness . 


108 


Lewd & Lascivious 


31 


Fornication .... 


16 


Wayward ..... 


15 


Larceny ..... 


11 


Truancy ..... 


10 


Assault & Battery 


7 


Runaway 


6 



Disturbing peace 
Malicious injury to building 
Breaking glass on highway 
Soliciting . 
Indecent actions 
Unlawful sale of liquor 
Drunk 



It is interesting to note that the greatest factors in delinquency are stub- 
bornness and lewdness. This proved true. last year also. 
The final dispositions were as foUoAvs: 



Committed to Industrial School . 
Committed to Industrial School 

tence suspended) 
Committed to Industrial School 

pealed) . . . . . 

Placed on probation . 

Filed 

Dismissed ..... 



(sen- 
(ap- 



32 

12 

2 
19 
21 
15 



Defaulted ...... 

Fined ...... 

Committed to Department Public Wel- 
fare (appealed) . . . . 

No finding . . . . . 

Committed to Department Public Wel- 
fare ...... 



While it is somewhat early to report on any of these last six girls men- 
tioned, it may be of interest to note a few facts: 

(a) 2/20/23. — Committed as delinquent on charge of lewdness, bringing 
with her her baby one month old. Relative by marriage responsible for her 
condition. Girl has been placed at board with baby. Has been found to be 
good-natured and a Avilling worker while under supervision, but perfectly 
helpless if left to her own resources. 

(b) 2/20/23. — Committed as wayward. Drunken mother and father who 
had deserted. No home influence whatever. Family continually moving from 
place to place. Girl placed at board. Has responded wonderfully to proper 
influences. Is attractive in person and manner. Chooses good friends. In 
8th grade. Doing good work. 

(c) 4/18/23. — Committed as delinquent on charge of larceny. Placed in 
a home at small wages. Is very slow and ignorant but up to the present time 
has not been dishonest. 

{d) 7/5/23. — Two sisters both committed as delinquent on charge of lewd- 
ness. Parents inferior type. Five younger children at home all living in two 
ixjoms. No training whatever. Both girls immoral. Older sister placed at 
board, found to be dishonest. Stealing from family, deceitful and immoral, 
having very bad influence over younger children in family. Fin;ally on 



P.D. 17, Part I. 21 

12/12/23 transferred to Industrial School at Lancaster. Younger sister placed 
at board, and while very crude in every respect, is sho^\'ing some improvement. 
(e) 11/6/23. — Committed as wayward. No home influence. Girl out at 
night and was immoral. When committed was three months' pregnant and 
showed moderately positive Wassermann. Placed at Talitha Cumi Home, 
awaiting confinement. 

The \'isitor in charge of the mentally defective girls made 487 visits during the 
year. Included in this group are 89 girls boarded in families, 33 in wage 
homes and 15 at the State Infirmary. It is with great satisfaction that we 
report the transfer from the State Infirmary t-o the Schools for the Feeble- 
minded of 93 girls and 70 boj^s who had been awaiting admission for a long 
time. Several of these girls were delinquent and their removal from the In- 
firmary was a great relief to that institution. With the subsequent discharge 
of these Avards and of a group alreadj^ in the schools, the supervision of 461 
feeble-minded boys and girls was transferred to the Department of Mental 
Diseases. There are yet remaining at the State Infirmarj^ 15 girls and 27 
boys whose mental or physical condition, or both, requires institutional or 
hospital care. 

Twenty-nine (29) of the boarded girls are in school, making little or no 
progress. 

Thirty-three (33) girls in wage homes are earning an average of $3.50 a 
week; after expenditures for clothing and allowances for spending money, 
there remained in savings more than $2,600 which is being held in trust for 
them until they leave our care. Four girls became of age last year, three 
remaining in same homes with intelligent, interested women who continue to 
exercise the same friendly oversight. One girl committed when thirteen years 
old developed from a very doubtful problem into a capable, self-respecting 
girl; she was discharged from custody in September as of age, and given her 
accumulated savings of $450. She remains in the same family ^nth whom she 
has lived for the pa.st two years. 

Adoptions. 

Applications for children for adoption: 

Pending at the beginning of the year ........ 17 

New applications ........... 147 



Disapproved without investigation ........ 18 

Withdrawn 24 

Investigated , . . . . . . . . . . .105 

Pending . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 



164 



164 



Homes investigated ............ 105 

Approved . . . . . . . . . . . .66 

Disapproved . . . . . . . . . " . . .39 

Fifty-nine children have been legally adopted during the year, thii-ty-eight 
girls and twenty-one boys. The oldest child adopted was a girl eighteen years 
of age and the youngest a boy thirteen months old. There are now on trial 
for adoption sixty-five children. Fifty-eight of these were placed during 
this year. 

Adoptions were granted during the year in the Probate Courts for the 
following Counties: Berkshire, 2; Bristol, 1; Essex, 7; Franklin, 1; Hamp- 
den, 5; Middlesex, 14; Norfolk, 10; Plymouth, 2; Suffolk, 9; Worcester, 7; 
Hillsboro County, N. H., 1, — 59. 

The above table shows clearly the State-wide call upon the Department 
for children for adoption, the demand being always greatly in excess of the 
supply. People in all walks of life are eager to adopt our children, and in 
some ca.ses even where they have children of their own. The short explanation 
is that they have become attached to the children and will not part with them 
under any circumstances. 

The general public thinks of the abandoned child or foundling as an un- 



22 P.D. 17, Part I. 

foi-tunate iiulividual, handicapped for life. Tlie efforts of the Depai-tment 
result in a far different fate for such children. Splendid people take them 
into their homes and adopt them, are happy in doing so, and give them far 
greater opportunities than they would ever have otherwise enjoyed. 

Subdivision of Investigation. 

The routine work in handling applications for care of dependent children 
has varied little from past years. There has been a decrease of one hundred 
twenty-three (123) in the number of new cases and an even greater decrease 
in the number of children received. The percentage of applications which 
were acceptetl was approximately twenty-eight and three-fifths percent (28%%) 
in 1022 and twenty-five percent" (25%)* in 1923. 

In so far as possible each investigator endeavors to keep in touch with the 
families of the children received so as to foster family spirit and keep alive 
a sense of responsibility both social and financial. In many instances the 
family tie seems easily broken. It frequently happens that an occasional 
visit shows happy children, Avell placed and contented in the foster home. 
The parent is tempted to ask himself, " Why, then, take on the burden of 
providing a home and thereby increasing labor? " The aim of the investigator 
is to watch her case and, when the primary cause for breaking up the family 
has adjusted itself, to urge a reunion. An instance of this sort follows: The 
mother in an Ai-menian family Avas removed from her home to a Sanatorium 
for treatment for tuberculosis. This was a self-respecting family and we 
were asked to care for the baby only, three older children to be provided for 
by relatives. The baby was placed within the radius reached by one carfare 
and the father visited regularly. When the mother was discharged from the 
hospital no effort Avas made to take the baby home. A few \dsits by the in- 
vestigator resulted in the return of the baby and the re-establishment of the 
family. 

Such cases are registered as " after care ", pending the investigation which 
Avill lead to a discharge. When the need of providing for the children is so 
urgent as to limit the time of investigation at the outset of the case it may 
become an " after care " case. This is exemplified in the case of a baby left 
with board unpaid for over a year. The illness of the boarding mother forced 
her appeal to this Division. A great deal of investigation was involved before 
much family history could be obtained. The parents of the child were traced 
to Canada and seen by local agencies in two cities but moved about and though 
promising much, failed in fulfillment. After a year spent in this futile effort, 
relatives in Massachusetts who had shown some interest were asked to take the 
child. They were people of excellent type and well able to provide. After 
some hesitation an aunt agreed to take the child if legal custody were obtained. 
This was easily arranged and visitation has proved the plan to be eminently 
successful. 

In cases Avhere the parents of foundlings are located, because of the serious- 
ness of the off'ence the matter is settled by court action and adjustment made 
according to the character and attitude of the defendant. Two mothers located 
in 1923 are serving sentences in the Reformatory for Women and, by court 
order, the babies are with the mothers. 

Another type of case is shown by the following story : — 

A woman Avas taken to the Psychopathic Hospital and transferred from 
there to one of the State Hospitals for mental diseases. A ten year old girl 
was left behind in the lodging house and turned over to this Division. The 
mother could not be intei-viewed but by following some rather indefinite clues 
given by the child who could just remember towns where she had lived, the 
father was located. He had been divorced and was remaiTied. He had cared 
for three other children but this girl had been left with her mother. His home 
was comfortable, his income adequate to provide for his daughter, and he was 
glad of the opportunity to have her. She is in his home under visitation 
during the adjustment period. 



P.D. 17, Part I. 23 

Occasionally in neglect cases there has been insufficient investigation previous 
to commitment. Therefore, sources of relief which might have been discovered 
Avere overlooked and the burden has fallen upon the Commonwealth. In one 
instance two boys were removed from the improper home of a stepmother. 
Both parents had died in another State and had never lived in Massachusetts. 
Upon making inquiries it developed that older children of the same family 
were public charges in another State. An application was made to the Depart- 
ment of Charities of that State and permission was given for the transfer of 
the boys to their family. 

Another somewhat similar case was the commitment of a child whose mother 
received a jail sentence for immorality. She had left her husband in another 
State and he was unaware of her Avhereabouts until notified of her arrest. 
Although her husband was acknowledged by her not to be the father of the 
child, he was much attached to the child and, as the mother had failed to 
protect him, was willing to do so himself. Through a local agency a boarding 
place wavS obtained and after the court had given to the stepfather the custody 
of the child he was transferred to the stepfather's care. Recent reports of 
conditions are excellent. 

The social value of such cases as Avell as the financial savings make us realize 
more and more the necessity of doing as much after care work as possible. 

Following are the statistics of the Subdivision of Investigation: 

Applications pending December 1, 1922 (Chapter 119, Section 38 of General 

Laws) 217 

Applications received .......... 1,026 



1,243 



Disposition as follows : — 
Applications withdrawn . 
Advised only .... 
Assumed by relatives and friends 
Assumed by other public agencies 
Assumed by private agencies 
Received (chapter 119, section 38, General Laws) 
Pending December 1, 1923 . . . . 



82 
29 
303 
185 
71 
257 
316 



1,243 



261 



261 



Applications for discharge pending December 1, 1922 .... 59 

Applications received (of which 59 were the result of after-care) pending 

December 1, 1922 202 

Disposition as follows : — 

Discharged ........... 134 

Discharge refused .......... 14 

Applications Withdrawn ......... 30 

Pending December 1, 1923 . . . 83 

After-care: — 

Pending December 1, 1922 17 

New cases added .......... 38 

• 55 

Closed 24 

Pending December 1, 1923 31 

55 

In pursuance of the policy of the Department of Public "Welfare to collect 
support from parents of children in charge of the Division, payments are 
secured either by voluntary agreements or by court orders made after non- 
support proceedings in the District Courts. 

A most important result of putting such pressure on parents is that in a 
large percentage of non-support cases the parents are thereby stimulated to 
establish a proper home and secure the return of their children. If this 
pressure is not applied many parents are willing enough to let the Common- 
wealth support their children. Although the saving which results from bring- 
ing non-support proceedings against parents cannot be tabulated, the amount 
is substantial. 

The receipts for contributory support of children in charge of the Division 
are shown in the following table : 



24 P.D. 17, Part 

Collections received from Cities and Towns and directly from Parents 



J 











Ye.vr 












Direct 


Cities and 
Towns 


Total 


1913 


$0,999 30 


$9,240 71 


816.240 01 


1914 






















8.017 7o 


11.496 87 


19.514 62 


1915 






















7.106 88 


17.959 41 


25.060 29 


1916 






















12.528 02 


21.828 07 


34.356 09 


1917 






















16.620 52 


24.651 03 


41,271 55 


1918 






















25.936 02 


28.545 45 


54.481 47 


1919 






















34.084 65 


44.816 77 


78.901 42 


1920 






















41,492 42 


57.433 73 


98.926 15 


1921 






















33.258 S3 


62.771 26 


96.030 09 


1922 






















29.847 30 


62.623 99 


92.471 29 


1923 . 




31.800 51 


83.775 21 


115,575 72 



Summary of Children under Three Years of Age 





Dependent 


Neglected 


Grand 




Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Total 


Number December 1 . 1 922 
Received December 1, 1922 to November 30, 
1923 


167 

85 


144 
73 


311 

158 


39 
37 


40 

31 


79 
68 


390 

226 


Total number in charoe .... 

Number transferred to department for children 

over three years of age .... 

Numbei discharged or died .... 


252 

56 
46 


217 

49 
44 


469 

105 
90 


76 

30 

18 


71 

27 
8 


147 

57 
26 


616 

162 
116 


Number remaining December 1, 1923 


150 


124 


274 


28 


36 


64 


338 



P.D. 17, Part I. 



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26 

Stahis of Children 



P.D. 17, Part I. 
over Three Years of Age in Custody during the Year ending 
November 30. 1923. 



Girls 



Boys 



In familios, receiving wages ..... 

In families, free of expense to State 

In families, clothing only provided 

In families, board and clothing provided 

In hospitals 

In United States Service 

Married 

Whereabouts unknown 

Total number in charge November 30, 1923 

Died 

Of age 

Transferred to Lyman School for Boys . 
Transferred to Industrial School for Boys 
Transferred to Industrial School for Girls 
Committed to Lyman School for Boys . 
Committed to Industrial School for Boys 
Committed to Industrial School for Girls 
Committed to Department for Defective Delinquents 
Committed to Mass. Reformatory for Women 

Adopted 

Discharged to place of settlement .... 
Discharged to Department of Mental Diseases 
Otherwise discharged 

Total number in custody during the year 



295 
242 
206 
,435 
119 

36 

28 



2,361 

10 

110 



1 
33 

2 
210 
164 



470 

362 

71 

,688 

111 

67 

10 

72 



2,851 

13 

120 

13 

2 

16 

7 



16 

5 

251 

307 



,602 



Applications for Discharge. 





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19 


127 


15 


55 


50 


11 


15 


Dehnquent 


3 


18 




6 


11 


1 


3 


Wayward 




1 


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Section 38, Chapter 119, General Laws 


19 


130 


80 


11 


28 


16 


14 


Section 22, Chapter 119, General Laws 


5 


29 


20 


3 


5 


4 


2 


Total 


46 


305 


115 


76 


94 


32 


34 



Discharges for adoption and transfers to industrial schools are not included in this table. 



Disposition by the Courts of Cases of Delinquent and Wayward Children. 
Number of Court notices received ......... 6,433 

Disposition of cases attended: 

Committed to Lyman School for Boys ....... 234 

Committed to Lyman School for Boys and appealed .... 79 

Committed to Lyman School for Boys and sentence suspended . . 258 

Committed to Industrial School for Boys ...... 131 

Committed to Industrial School for Boys and appealed .... 58 

Committed to Industrial School for Boys and sentence suspended . . 211 

Committed to Industrial School for Girls ...... 61 

Committed to Industrial School for Girls and appealed .... 7 

Committed to Industrial School for Girls and sentence suspended . . 37 

Committed to Department of Public Welfare ..... 32 

Committed to Department of Public Welfare and appealed ... 4 

Committed to Department of Public Welfare and sentence suspended . 9 

Committed to Massachusetts Reformatory ...... 4 

Committed to Massachusetts Reformatory and appealed ... 1 

Committed to Reformatory for Women and sentence suspended . . 1 

Committed to Department for Defective Delinquents .... 1 

Committed to County Training Schools ...... 44 

Committed to County Training Schools and appealed .... 2 



P.D. 17, Part I. 

Committed to County Training Schools and sentence suspended 

Committed to House of Correction .... 

Committed to House of Correction and sentence suspended 

Held for Superior Court 

Probation .... 

Fined .... 

Fined and appealed 

Fine suspended . 

Continued 

Continued in care of Department of Public Welfare 

Failed to appear 

Discharged 

Dismissed .... 

Filed .... 

Appealed from finding 

Total number of cases attended 



27 



28 

1 

1 

34 

2,109 

201 

27 

31 

1,296 

49 

145 

300 

325 

1,065 

35 



6,911 



Dispositions by the Courts of Cases of Neglected Children. 
Number of court notices received ....... 

Disposition of cases attended : 
Committed to Department of Public Welfare ..... 

Committed to Department of Public Welfare and appealed 
Committed to Department of Public Welfare and sentence suspended 
Committed to Child Welfare Division ....... 

Committed to Child Welfare Division and appealed .... 

Committed to Overseers of the Poor ....... 

Placed on file ........... 

Discharged . . . . . . . 

Dismissed ............ 

Continued ........... 

Continued and placed in Home for Destitute Catholic Children 
Continued in charge of Department of Public Welfare .... 

Failed to appear .......... 

Appealed from finding ......... 

Total number of cases attended ....... 



231 

29 

3 

15 

1 

1 

52 

20 

53 

674 

89 

109 

23 

10 



821 



1,310 



In order to get an approximate idea of the final result of our care, the 
Commissioner has analyzed the apparent situation upon discharge of 573 
minor wards discharged during the year ending November 30, 1923. 

573 discharges December 1, 1922 to November 30, 1923, of which — 
416 were successes. 
61 were failures. 
52 were doubtful. 

44 were discharges to Schools for the Feeble-Minded. 

Of the 416 successes — 

45 were discharged to adoption. 

340 were discharged to own homes or relatives. 
15 were discharged to place of settlement. 
2 were discharged to Overseers of the Poor. 
7 were discharged to be deported to homes or relatives. 
2 were discharged to U. S. Service. 

1 ran away but later made good and became selfsupporting and was then discharged. 
4 were entirely selfsupporting and were educating themselves. 

Of the 61 failures — 

53 were discharged to the State Training Schools. 
5 ran away. 

1 was transferred to Massachusetts Reformatory. 
1 was transferred to the State Farm. 

1 when last heard of was under arrest in California for stealing a horse. 

Of the 52 cases in which the outcomes were doubtful — 
31 were discharged to own homes or relatives. 

2 were deported to Canada with their mother. 

3 were discharged to mothers at Reformatory for Women. 

4 were kidnapped by mother. 

12 were discharged as their whereabouts had been unknown for some time. 

Of the 573 children discharged — 

295 had been committed as Dependent. 
202 had been committed as Ncfjlccted. 
76 had been committed as Delinquent. 



28 P.D. 17, Part I. 

The 573 wards studied had been in the custody of the Department for the 
following periods of time: 98 had been in custody less than 1 year; 276 had 
been in custody between 1 and 5 years; 126 had been in custody between 6 and 
10 yeaivi; 65 had been in custody between 11 and 15 yeai's; and 8 had been in 
custody over 15 yeai-s. 

Localities from which New Children were received. 



Abington . 


1 


Halifax . 


1 


Provincetown 


5 


Acushnet . 


3 


Haverhill . 


2 


Quincy 


15 


Amos bury 


2 


Holbrook . 


4 


Reading 


3 


Arlington . 


1 


Holyoke . 


35 


Rockland . 


2 


Athol 


5 


Hopkinton 


1 


Rowley 


1 


Attleboro . 


3 


Hudson 


1 


Salem 


16 


Beverly . 


7 


Lakeville . 


2 


Sherborn , 


4 


Boston 


200 


Lawrence . 


35 


Somerville 


13 


Braintree . 


4 


Leicester . 


1 


Southbridge 


4 


Brockton , 


36 


Lenox 


1 


Springfield 


23 


Brookline . 


2 


Leominster 


5 


Sterling 


1 


Cambridge 


25 


Lowell 


15 


Stoneham . 


3 


Canton 


3 


Ludlow 


4 


Stoughton 


2 


Chelsea . 


9 


Lynn 


27 


Taunton . 


1 


Chicopee . 


4 


Maiden 


10 


Tewksbury 


42 


Concord . 


2 


Mansfield . 


1 


Townsend 


1 


Dan vers . 


1 


Marlborough 


1 


Ux bridge . 


1 


Dartmouth 


7 


Medfield . 


1 


Wakefield . 


7 


Dedham . 


1 


Medford . 


3 


Walpole 


1 


Duxbury . 


4 


Melrose 


2 


Waltham . 


2 


East Bridgewater 


2 


Middleborough . 


3 


Ware 


2 


Easthampton 


1 


Milford . 


3 


Wareham . 


1 


Edgartown 


5 


Natick 


1 


Warwick . 


3 


Essex 


1 


New Bedford . 


22 


Watertown 


1 


Everett 


3 


Newbury . 


1 


Webster 


1 


Faiihaven 


3 


Newton 


2 


West bo rough 


2 


Fall River 


12 


North Adams 


3 


Westfield . 


11 


Fitchburg . 


10 


Northampton 


6 


West Newbury . 


2 


Framingham 


10 


Northfield 


2 


Williamstown 


5 


Gardner . 


12 


Orange 


1 


Woburn . 


3 


Gloucester 


10 


Peabody . 


5 


Worcester 


47 


Grafton 


1 


Pittsfield . 


9 






Greenfield 


2 


Plympton . 


1 




828 



Licensed Boarding Houses for Infants. 

During the last official year 340 licenses to maintain boarding houses for 
infants were granted under the provisions of General Laws, chapter 119, 
section 2, in 88 cities and to^\Tis, in addition to the 325 licenses in force at the 
expiration of the pre\^ous year; 300 licenses expired by the one-year limita- 
tion; 49 were cancelled (44 because of changes of residence, 3 because of an 
infant under two in the family, 2 were voluntarily surrendered) ; 24 were 
withdrawn, 10 were refused; 315 licenses, permitting the boarding of 659 
infants in 82 cities and towns, remained in force November 30, 1923. These 
represent the licensed homes, not only of infants supported by the Common- 
wealth, but also of those under the age of two years placed out by parents and 
many private agencies. 

During the past year, the State nurses have made 1,653 visits to infants 
placed in homes under private supervision and the supervision of societies. 
(Visits to infants under the supervision of the Department of Public Welfare 
are not included.) 

It has been necessary to take court action in private cases where laws 
governing the protection of infants (chapter 119) were wilfullj'' violated, and 
strict supervision is being kept in many instances. 

The inspector of infant boarding houses made 157 \dsits during the year 
investigating complaints. Four babies were removed under the provisions 
of section 28 of chapter 119 because removal Avas necessary to save their lives. 



P.D. 17, Part I. 29 

Summary of Infants under Two Years of Age reported to the Department of 

Public Welfare from December 1, 1922, to November 30, 1923, under 

Chapter X19 of the General Laws, ivhich provides for the Protection of 

Infants and the Licensing and Regulation of Boarding Houses for them. 



Supervision of 



Private 

Division of Child Guardianship 

St. Mary's Infant Asylum, Boston 

Boston Children's Aid Association 

Sisters of Providence, Brightside, Holyoke 

City of Boston, Institutions Department 

Worcester Children's Friend Society 

Talitha Cumi Home, Boston 

Bethlehem Home, Taunton 

Children's Bureau, Federated Jewish Charities, Boston 

Boston Children's Friend Society ....... 

New England Home for Little Wanderers, Boston 

Catholic Charitable Bureau, Boston 

The Florence Crittenton Home, Boston 

New Bedford Children's Aid Society 

Child Welfare House, Lynn 

Lynn Catholic Charities Center 

Springfield Children's Aid Society 

The Church Home Society, Boston 

Temporary Home and Day Nursery Society, Worcester 
New England Home for Little Wanderers, Pittsfield 

Avon Home, Cambridge . 

Northampton Children's Aid Society 

Brockton Catholic Charities Center 

Children's Mission to Children, Boston 

Home for Friendless Women and Children, Springfield 

Somerville Catholic Charities Center 

Salem Catholic Charities Center 

Probation Officer, Boston 

Lawrence Catholic Charities Center . . . 

House of Mercy, Boston ......... 

Parole Department, Industrial School for Girls, Boston 
Wachusett Children's Aid Society, Fitchburg .... 

Lowell Catholic Charities Center 

Lawrence City Mission . . 

Knights of Columbus Guild, Lowell 

Guild of St. Agnes, Worcester ....... 

Order of Passionists, Fall River 

South End Chinese Mission, Boston 

Overseers of the Poor, Worcester 

Department of Aid and Relief, State House, Boston . 
Social Service Department, Boston Lying-in Hospital . 

Police Woman, Lowell 

Probation Officer, Newton 

Overseers of the Poor, Lynn 

Overseers of the Poor, Medford . . . . ... 

Overseers of the Poor, Peabody 

Overseers of the Poor, Essex 

Department of Correction, State House, Boston .... 
Mass. Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Beverly 
Mass. Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Northampton 
Social Service Department, Memorial Hospital, Worcester . 

Boston Society for the Care of Girls 

Family Welfare Association, Brockton 

Family Welfare Association, Salem 

Family Welfare Association, Pittsfield 



The actual number of infants reported, less duplication of supei*vision, 
2,259. Of this number, 72 died and 21 were adopted. 



30 



P.D. 17, Part I. 
Ages at Death of 72 Infants reported in Preceding Table. 



Infants 


2 
IS 
o 

a 


a 
a 


1 


1 
> 

I 
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One month but under two . 


1 


4 


3 


- 




_ 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


9 


Two montlis l)ut under three 


_ 


1 


2 


_ 




_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


4 


Three months but under four 


_ 


3 


1 


_ 




1 


_ 


- 


_ 


_ 


5 


Four months but uniler five . 


1 


2 


_ 


2 






1 


_ 


_ 


1 


7 


Five months but under six . 




3 


1 


2 




_ 




_ 


_ 




7 


Six months but under one J-ear 


8 


5 


6 


2 




1 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


23 


One year but under two years 


8 




2 


2 




1 




2 


1 


- 


17 


Totals 


18 


18 


15 


8 




3 


2 


2 


1 


1 


72 



Licensed Lying-in Hospitals, 1922-1923. 

Licenses in force December 1, 1922 (in 98 towns) ....... 219 

Expired ............. 91 

Surrendered . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 

Revoked ............. 1 

Ill 

Continuing in force ............ 108 

Reissues ............. 86 

New issues ............ 28 







114 


Licenses in force November 30, 1923 (in 95 towns) . 




222 


Corporations ......... 


. 115 




Physicians ......... 


. 27 




Registered nurses ........ 


. 34 




Overseers of the poor ....... 


8 




Other persons ......... 


. 38 





222 



Applications refused, 9; withdrawn, 2. 



The inspector made 288 visits to hospitals and 46 visits to investigate com- 
plaints. 

The returns from a questionnaire mailed to each licensee show 21,963 cases 
delivered in 173 hospitals, — deaths of mothers, 200 ; deaths of babies, 624 ; 
still-bii-tlis, 918. 

Two hundred eight (208) notices of discharge from maternity hospitals of 
infants with inflamed eyes were received during the year. Seventeen (17) 
of the 222 hospitals reported eye infection. 

The following table shows in detail the reports received in accordance with 
Rule 10 for the period from December 1, 1922 to November 30, 1923. 



P.D. 17, Part I. 



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32 P.D. 17, Part I. 

Tuition of Children under the Care and Control of the Department. 

Under the operation of General Laws, chapter 76, sections 7 to 10, inclusive, 
governing reimbui'sements by. the Commonwealth for tuition of State wards 
in public schools, bills received from 219 cities and towns for the tuition and 
trans poi-tation of 3,955 children, amounting to $196,449.66, — viz., schooling 
$175,012.46; transportation, $21,012.46 — were audited by the Department 
and paid by the Treasui-er of the Commonwealth during the last official year. 
The distribution of the children was as follows : — 



Abington (1921) 


4 


Dracut 


5 


Marion (1923) . 


Abington (1922) 


22 


Dunstable 


9 


Maynard . 


Abington (1923) 


'. "o 


p]ast Bridgewate 


r . 16 


Medfield . 


Acton 


2 


Easthampton 


1 


Medford . 


Agawam 


2 


East on (1922) 


. 24 


Medway (1922) . 


Amesbury 


'. '. 3 


Easton (1923) 


14 


Med way (1923) . 


Amherst 


. 28 


Enfield 


. 56 


Melrose 


Aiulover 


6 


Everett . 


. 26 


Mendon 


Arlington . 


7 


Fairhaven 


4 


Merrimac (1922) 


Ashfiold . 


4 


Fall River (1922 


) . 6 


Merrimac (1923) 


Ashhmd 


5 


Fall River (1923 


) . 5 


Middleborough . 


At hoi 


. 20 


Falmouth . 


8 


Middlefield 


Attleboro . 


3 


Fitchburg . 


9 


Middleton 


Ayer 


6 


Foxborough (192 


1) . 16 


Milford (1922) . 


Barnstable (1922 


) . 4 


Foxbo rough (192 


2) . 10 


Milford (1923) . 


Barnstable (192;j 


) . 4 


Foxborough (192 


3) . 17 


Millis 


Barre 


6 


Framingham 


. 55 


Monson 


Becket 


. 18 


Franklin . 


15 


Montague 


Belchertown (19 


22) . 42 


Gardner . 


6 


Montgomery 


Belehertown (19 


23) . 16 


Georgetown 


17 


Nahant (1922) . 


Bellingham (192 


2) . 10 


Gill . 


3 


Nahant (1923) . 


Belmont . 


5 


Gloucester 


8 


Natick (1921) . 


Berlin 


. 11 


Grafton 


4 


Natick (1922) . 


Bernardstown 


6 


Gran by (1922) 


16 


Natick (1923) . 


Beverly 


8 


Granby (1923) 


4 


New Ashford 


Billerica . 


6 


Greenfield (1922 


) . 3 


New Bedford . 


Bolton 


12 


Greenfield (1923 


8 


New Marlborough 


Boston (1922) 


. 115 


Greenwich 


15 


New Salem 


Boston (1923) 


. 148 


Groton 


15 


Newburyport 


Boxbo rough 


3 


Hadley . 


2 


Newton (1922) . 


Boxford . 


1 


Halifax . 


4 


Newton (1923) . 


Braintree (1922) 


1 


Hamilton . 


1 


North Adams 


Braintree (1923) 


11 


Hampden . 


19 


North Andover . 


Brewster . 


11 


Hardwick (1922) 


. 27 


North Attleborough . 


Bridgewater 


11 


Hardwick (1923) 


. 20 


No. Brookfield (1922) . 


Brimfield . 


14 


Harwich . 


9 


No. Brookfield (1923) . 


Brockton (1922) 


. 53 


Haverhill . 


9 


North Reading (1922) 


Brockton (1923) 


. 24 


Hawley (1922) 


. 80 


North Reading (1923) 


Brookfield 


4 


Hawley (1923) 


. 44 


Northborough . 


Buckland (1922) 


. 17 


Holbrook . 


1 


Norton 


Buckland (1923) 


9 


Holland . 


1 


Norwell (1922) . 


Burlington 


2 


Holliston . 


9 


Norwell (1923) . 


Cambridge 


. 68 


Holyoke . 


2 


Norwood (1922) 


Canton 


15 


Hopedale . 


3 


Norwood (1923) 


Carlisle . 


10 


Hopkinton 


. 46 


Orange (1922) . 


Charlemont 


15 


Hubbardston 


3 


Orange (1923) . 


Charlton . 


7 


Hudson 


13 


Orleans 


Chatham . 


2 


Huntington 


7 


Otis . . . . 


Chelmsford 


17 


Kingston . 


5 


Palmer 


Chelsea (1922) 


8 


Lanesborough 


3 


Peabody . 


Chelsea (1923) 


. 12 


Lawrence . 


11 


Pelham 


Cheshire 


5 


Lee . 


1 


Pembroke (1921) 


Chester 


9 


Leominster 


8 


Pembroke (1922) 


Chesterfield 


4 


Leverett . 


3 


Pembroke (1923) 


Chicopee . 


. 13 


Lexington (1922) 


. 13 


Pepperell . 


Colrain (1922) 


. 20 


Lexington (1923) 


11 


Petersham 


Colrain (1923) 


12 


Leyden 


9 


Phillipston 


Concord . 


9 


Lincoln 


11 


Pittsfield . 


Conway . 


17 


Littleton . 


3 


Plainville (1922) 


Cummington 


5 


Lowell 


. 41 


Plain ville (1923) 


Dana 


7 


Lunenburg (1922 


) . 2 


Plympton . 


Danvers 


15 


Lunenburg (1923 


) . 1 


Provincetown 


Dedham . 


. 42 


Lynnfield . 


11 


Quincy (1922) . 


Deerfield . 


2 


Maiden 


21 


Quincy (1923) . 


Douglas . 


4 


Marblehead 


6 


Randolph (1922) 


Dover 


1 


Marion (1922) 


9 


Randolph (1923) 



P.D. 17, Part I. 

Ravnham (1922) 
Raynham (1923) 
Reading (1921) . 
Reading (1922) . 
Reading (1923) . 
Rockland (1922) 
Rockland (1923) 
Rowe (1921) 
Rowe (1922) 
Rowe (1923) 
Rowley 
Royalston 
Rutland . 
Salem 
Saugus 
Savoy 

Shelburne (1922) 
Shelburne (1923) 
Sherborn . 
Shirley 
Somerset . 
Somerville 
Southampton 
Southborough (1922) 
Southborough (1923) 
Southbiidge (1922) 



10 
14 
25 
21 
24 
17 
16 
13 
20 
17 

4 

4 

6 
13 
18 

1 

5 

5 

5 

5 

4 
58 

3 
20- 
21 

1 



Southbridge (1923) 

Spencer (1922) 

Springfield 

Stoneham . 

Stoughton (1922) 

Stow 

Sudbury . 

Swampscott 

Taunton . 

Templeton 

Tewksbury 

Topsfield (1922) 

Topsfield (1923) 

Townsend (1922) 

Tyringham 

Upton 

Ux bridge . 

Wakefield . 

Waltham . 

Ware 

Wareham (1922) 

Wareham (1923) 

Watertown 

Way land . 

Wellesley (1922) 

Wellesley (1923) 



1 

1 

30 

11 

35 

1 

3 

1 

31 

14 

2 

14 

6 

5 

3 

14 

1 

43 

18 

34 

17 

16 

18 

6 

12 

7 



Wendell . 
W. Bridgewater (21) 
W. Bridgewater (22) 
W. Bridgewater (23) 
W. Brookfield . 
W. Springfield . 
Westborough 
Westford . 
Weston 

Weymouth (1922) 
Weymouth (1923) 
Whitman (1922) 
Whitman (1923) 
Wilbraham 
Williamsburg 
Williamstown 
Wilmington 
Winchendon (1922) 
Winchendon (1923) 
Winchester 
Winthrop . 
Worcester (1922) 
Worcester (1923) 
Worthington 

Total 



33 

5 
3 

7 

5 

1 

3 

7 

12 

14 

16 

16 

33 

24 

9 

23 

23 

15 

3 

1 

25 

9 

15 

11 

2 



3,955 



DIVISION OF JUVENILE TRAINING. 

Chaeles M. Da\^xport^ Director. 
Robert J. Watson^ Executive Secretary. 

On November 30, 1923, the total number of children who were wards of the 
Trustees of Massachusetts Training Schools was 4,097, distributed as follows : ■ — 



School 


In the Schools 


On Parole 


Totals 


Lyman School for Boys 

Industrial School for Boys . . . ' . 
Industrial School for Girls 


450 
224 
243 


1,833 
881 
466 


2,283 

1,105 

709 




917 


3,180 


4,097 



During the year 1923 the number of commitments to the three schools 
dropped considerably as compared Avith the previous two years. Commitments 
to the Lyman School for Boys decreased 12.7 per cent in 1923 from 1922. 
The Industrial School for Girls shows a decrease of 12.8 per cent while the 
Industrial School for Boys shows a decrease of 35.5 per cent. The decrease 
in the number of commitments has resulted in a lower daily average number 
of inmates in all of the schools. 

The ti-ustees have held twelve meetings during the year in addition to forty 
meetings of various committees. Each request for the release or parole of a 
boy or girl is given careful and thorough attention by the trustees. A total 
of 109 separate visits have been made to the three schools by members of the 
Board of Trustees during the past year. In addition to these ^asits made by 
the trustees, the executive secretary of the Board has visited the three schools 
forty-five times during the year. When a boy is ready for parole, the parole 
visitor investigates his home and makes a report to the trustees. If the boy's 
home seems to offer a fair chance of his succeeding there on his return, the 
trustees will give him a trial at home. If he does not succeed, he will be 
returned to the school and perhaps placed out with a family in the country 
until he seems worthy of another trial at home. 

The savings accounts of boys and girls on parole continue to grow. All 
boys and girls are urged to save in order that they may have something to 
start ydih. when they reach the age of twenty-one and pass out of the tmstees' 
care. At the close of the year the Boys' Parole Branch reported a total 



34 P.D. 17, Part T. 

balance on deposit of $30,788.58 representing 845 accounts. This is a net 
gain of $6,798.18 over the previous year. Tlie Girls' Parole Branch had a 
balance on deposit of $22,222.40 for the corresponding period, representing 
550 accounts, a net gain of $2,149.49. 

Boys' Parole Branch. 

John J. Smith, Superintendent. 

Of the 1,833 boys on parole from L>anan School for Boys, 443, or 78.72 per 
cent were doing well and only 48 were classed as idle; of the 881 on parole 
from the Industrial School for Boys, 657, or 74.58 per cent, were doing Avell and 
only 29 were idle. This was due largely to close supervision by the \asitors who 
made 14,358 visits during the year. In the same period they relocated 391 
boys who were misfits at place or at home. It is encouraging to note that 
only 349 boys were returned to Lyman School for Boys for violation of parole 
as compared with 392 during the previous year. 

The number of boys returned to Lyman School for Boys during the year 
totals 398, avs compared with 440 in 1922, and to the Industrial School for Boys, 
107 as compared with 99 in 1922. These numbers are large, and we look for a 
marked improvement because of the more strict discipline now in effect at the 
schools for these boys who are returned because of violation of parole. 

At the close of the year our records show 166 boys on parole from Lyman 
School and 100 from the Industrial School for Boys whose Avhereabouts and 
occupations were unknown. No doubt this large numl^er w^as due to the 
decline in general business. Many of our wards who found work readily when 
business was good were unable to stand existing competition. Constant pres- 
sure at home when idle, or love of excitement induced many to try their luck 
elsewhere. Then, too, many Avho were not doing well undoubtedly left home to 
escape trouble. On account of the prevalence of auto trucks, it is easy to 
travel from one state to another, and this method is usually employed by boys 
who leave home. Occasionally we hear of some lad unknown for months 
reporting from a distant State that he has found work and is trying to hold 
his job. It is natural, also, to suppose that many of these unknowns are locked 
up in institutions in various States. It is hard for our visitors to locate boys 
whose parents move frequently and Avho intentionally try to avoid being fol- 
lowed up, because too much valuable time is lost. 

Girls' Parole Branch. 

Miss Almeda F. Cree, Superintendent. 

The paroled girl must compete with those who have had much better and 
many more opportunities for right living and advancement. Our aim is to help 
her find her little niche and from there become absorbed in the community. 
We have manj^ girls who are, or have been, telephone operators, trained nurses, 
store clerks, office clerks, hairdressers, stenographers, dressmakers, and even 
teachers, who are competing creditably with girls who have come from more 
favorable circumstances. 

The paroled girl has much to discourage her in those members of our com- 
munities to whom she naturally looks for example and advice. For too often 
she has to depend on people who lack a sympathetic understanding of her 
needs and problems. Even at the present time our paroled girls are not 
accepted in most places of employment, except at housework, if their previous 
history is known. Therefore I wdsh to emphasize that the value of parole 
work has not yet been appreciated by the average layman. 

To fit a girl into the right home Avhere enough, but not too much, will be 
required of her, where she can have proper supendsion while at ^\ov\i and at 
play, where she can be mothered and trained and developed and studied and 
kept happy, is a task that tests the resourcefulness of the Department. Each 
girl must be placed in the home best suited to her peculiarities and her capa- 



P.D. 17, Part I. 35 

bilities. Her likes and dislikes, her strong and weak points, her physical 
strength and mental equipment must all be carefully considered. The visitor 
who has charge of the placing has given the best of herself to it. Her success is 
shown in the following figures : 62 girls remained in the same foster homes 
from 1 to 2 yeai-s, 20 girls remained in the same foster homes from 2 to 3 
years, 8 girls remained in the same foster homes from 3 to 4 years, making 90 
girls who completed at least a year's stay in the same foster home; 34 were 
in the same housework places from Dec. 1, 1922 to Dec. 1, 1923. The dis- 
tricting of the State recommended in la-st year's report has been accomplished. 
If each visitor has her girls grouped in a territory wholly her own she may 
have more time for \dsiting and can search out and open up many new avenues 
for the advanceanent of her girls. Each visitor has been assigned a large 
district at a distance from Boston together with a small district near Boston. 
The nearby districts are for hospital eases and for girls newly paroled from 
the School, who must be \^sited frequently at fii'st. As these girls improve 
physically and morally, they are moved to the distant district. 

It would be a great pity to lose the splendid opportunities that our country 
village homes offer. There the girls can enter into the church and neighbor- 
hood activities in ways which are not possible in the city or near-city home. 

The need of medical attention has greatly increased this year. Girls have 
been taken to hospitals, private doctors, and dentists 1,632 times against 
1,161 times last year. There have been 142 ward patients. 

HOUSING AND TOWN PLANNING. 

Edtvard T. Hartman, Visitor to Planning Boards. 
Miss Miriam I. RosS;, Secretary. 

Progress in Planning. 

Sixty-six active planning boards in Massachusetts; a State Consultant on 
Housing and Planning; a State Division of Metropolitan Planning; forma- 
tion of the Metropolitan Boston Planning Federation; ten cities and towns 
already zoned; twenty-nine more actively at work on zoning; fourteen with 
comprehensive plans accepted or in preparation ; — these are a few of the 
encouraging things to report this year for Massachusetts. 

Intelligent interest in planning is increasing. City and town officials are 
coming more and more to recognize its value. Largely responsible for this is 
the direct and forceful appeal of zoning, the success of which is being demon- 
strated all over the country. It-s benefits can be shown in a more orderly 
an'angement of the physical city, in stabilized real estate values and protected 
home areas. And here a note of warning might not be amiss. Zoning should 
not be done hurriedly. Expert ad\4ce should be secured and a thoix)ugh-going 
zoning plan should be tied up as far as possible with the comprehensive city 
plan. Only reasonable zoning can be expected to be upheld by the Courts, — 
zoning which is in accordance with the State enabling act and which is done 
wholly to promote, not retard, the general welfare of the community, — not 
to stop building, but to encourage building in the right place and under the 
right conditions. 

Other outstanding problems which are receiving much attention are metro- 
politan or regional planning and through traffic ways. 

An act^ passed by the Legislature this 5'ear made possible the formation of 
a Division of Metropolitan Planning as a part of the Metropolitan District 
Commission. This division is instructed to " investigate and make recom- 
mendations as to transportation service and facilities ^Wthin the district ". 
Money has been appropriated, the division is at work and great things are 
expected from this beginning. 

In addition to this a federation has been formed of planning boards in the 
metropK)litan district, a voluntary organization intended to promote a regional 

» Chapter 399. Acta of 1923. 



36 P.D. 17, Part I. 

plan for the district. It will help along the work of the State division as 
much as possible and will study questions other than transportation, to which 
alone the State Division is confined. 

Regional planning hjus been given a start in the Connecticut Valley, also, 
with the appointment of a commi;ssion^ to study and report upon the highways, 
parks and reservations in the Connecticut Valley District. 

Seventy conferences have been held ^\'^th representatives of forty-four plan- 
ning boards. In twenty-two cases these conferences were with boards in 
session. Visits have been made and conferences held in eight places where 
boiirds do not exist or are inactive. Thirteen new boards have been established 
this year. 

The department has continued its policy of cooperating with the Massachu- 
setts Federation of Planning Boards in arranging the State Conference and 
in the preparation and distribution of bulletins. Two bulletins were published 
this year, one on billboard regulation in Massachusetts and elsewhere and the 
other a review of activities and tendencies in town planning in Massachusetts. 
Four radio talks have been given and many articles have been published as 
part of a much needed educational work. 

The State Conference of Planning Boards Avas held this year in Springfield, 
about one hundred members, representing twentj^-six planning boards, attending. 
The Conference wa^ well Avorth while, discussion at the afteroon session on 
Thursday being on methods of securing enforcement of the, city plan by keep- 
ing buildings out of the beds of mapped streets. The evening session was 
devoted to reports from the Division of Metropolitan Planning, the Metro- 
politan Boston Planning Federation, the newly appointed Coimecticut Valley 
Park Commission and reports of local planning boards. Encouraging progress 
was reported in many lines of activity, zoning taking the lead in every case. 
At the morning session on Friday were given reports of the billboard com- 
mittee, the zoning committee and the Visitor to Planning Boards or State Con- 
sultant on Houijing and Planning. An invitation was extended to the Confer- 
ence to hold its next meeting in Worcester where zoning and a comprehensive 
plan are well under way. 

Zoning. 

The folloAA-ing tables show what has been accomplished in zoning in Massa- 
chusetts since the passage of the enabling act in 1920. IMassachusetts stands 
sixth among the states in the number of places zoned. New Jei'sey leads with 
fifty-one; New York is second with thirty; Illinois third with twenty-three; 
California fourth mth seventeen; Ohio fifth mth thirteen.* 



Cities and Towns which 



been Zoned. 



City or Town 



Date of Acceptance 



Brockton . 
Springfield 
Springfield 
Winthrop . 
Brookline . 
Milton 

Ix)ngmeadow 
North Adams 
New-ton 
Worcester . 
West Springfield 



November, 1920. 

December, 1921 (Interim). 

December. 1922 (Final). 

March, 1922, 

May, 1922. 

July, 1922. 

July, 1922. 

September, 1922 (Interim). 

December, 1922. 

March, 1923 (Interim). 

May, 1923. 



1 Chapter 69, Resolves, 1923. 

2 From figures compiled by the Department of Commerce, Washington, D. C. 



P.D. 17, Part I. 



Cities and Towns at work on Zoning. 



37 



Arlinffton. 


Milton 1. 


Bedford. 


Natick. 


Boston. 


New Bedford. 


Brookline. i 


North Adams. « 


Cambridge. 


Northampton. 


Clinton. 


Norwood. 


Dedham. 


Quincy. 


Fall River. 


Somerv'ille. 


Framingham, 


Swampscott. 


Gardner. 


Wakefield. 


Haverhill. 


Watertown. 


Lexington. 


Wellesley. 


Lynn. 


Winchester. 


Maiden. 


Woburn. 


Melrose. 


Worcester. « 



Working on revision. 



2 Working on complete ordinance. 



Zoning under Consideration. 



Gloucester 
Holyoke 



Lowell 
Needham 



The table below shows the present status of planning boards in Massachu- 
setts cities and towns: 



Active 


Boards 


Inactive Boards 


No Boards 


Amesbury 


Milton 1 


Chicopee 


Adams 


Amherst 1 


Natick 


Greenfield - 2 


Beverly 


Arlington 


Needham i 




Chelsea 


Attleboro 


New Bedford 




Danvers 


Bedford 1 


Newton 




Gardner 


Belmont 


North Adams 




Methuen 


Boston 


Northampton 




Newburyport 


Braintree 


Norwood 




Northbridge 


Brockton 


Pittsfield 




Peabody 


Brookline 


Plymouth 




Saugus 


Cambridge 


Quincy 




Weymouth — 11 


Clinton 


Reading! 






Dedham 


Revere 






Easthampton 


Salem 






Everett 


Somerville 






Fall River 


Southbridge 






Fitchburg 


Springfield 






Framingham 


Stoneham i 






Gloucester 


Stoughtoni 






Haverhill 


Taunton 






Hinghami 


Wakefield 






Holyoke 


Walpolei 






Lawrence 


Waltham 






Leominster 


Watertown 






Lexington i 


Webster 






Longmeadowi 


Wellesley 1 






Lowell 


Westfield 






Lvnn 


Weston 1 






Maiden 


West Springfield 






Marlborough 


Winchester 






Medford 


Winthrop 






Melrose 


Woburn 






Milford 


Worcester — 66 







1 Towns under 10,000 population. 

Housing Experiment at Lowell. 

The Lowell houses are all occupied and there has been a change of owner- 
ship in one of the houses. The original purchaser has retained his house in 
only one case. A statement of the money spent and the money paid back into 
the State treasury is as follows : — 



38 P.D. 17, Part I. 

Appropriation (made in 1917) ......... §50,000 00 

Expenses: 

Land purchased, 7 acres with room for 40 houses, including also 



one house standing on lot 
Cost of 12 houses 
Improvements 



$12,500 00 

28.128 77 
2.626 77 



Balance ...... 

Paid back to treasury in monthly instalments: 
Interest ...... 

Principal ...... 



$7,106 05 
11,763 04 



Principal remaining unpaid Dec. 1, 1923 



43,255 54 

$6,744 46 

$18,869 09 

$24,911 31 



THE STATE INFIRMARY, TEWKSBURY. 

John H. Nichols, M.D., Superintendent, 
Trustees. 

Mr. Galen L. Stone, Brookline, Chairman. 
Mrs. Nellie E. Talbot, Brookline, Secretary. 
Mi^. Mary E. Cogan, Stoneham. 
Francis W. Anthony, M.D., Haverhill. 
Mr. Dennis D. Sullivan, Middlelx) rough. 
Mr. Walter F. Dearborn, Cambridge. 
G. Forrest Martin, M.D., Lowell. 

Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $2,325,741.53. 
Noi-mal capacity of plant, 2,490. Value per unit of capacity, $934.03. 
Pix)\'ides almshoiLse and hospital care for indigent persons not chargeable 
for support to any city or town. 

Numhers. 



Males 



Females 



Total 



Number December 1, 1922 . 
Admittetl during year . 
DischarKed during year . 
Remaining November 30, 1923 
Individuals under care during year 
Daily average inmates during year 
Daily average employees during year 
Largest census during year . 
Smallest census during year . 



1.238 
1,520 
1,603 
1,155 


1,076 
576 
720 
932 


1,099 
179 


982 
226 


- 


- 



2,314 
2,096 
2,323 
2,087 
4.070 
2,081 
405 
2,417 
1,828 



This decrease in numbers reflects transfer of 200 children to the three schools 
for feeble-minded, and sick minor wards to Bradford Infirmary. 

Three thousand seven hundred seventy-four cases, of which 2,581 were males 
and 1.193 females, Avere treated in the general hospital wards; 829 discharged 
well, 546 relieved, 658 not relieved, 283 died and 1,458 remained in the hospital 
at end of ye^r. Of this number in the hospital there were 424 cases of pul- 
monary tul)erculosis, 18 of diphtheria, 3 of erysipelas, 5 of scarlet fever and 21 
of whooping cough. There Avere also 139 cases of alcoholism, 68 more than in 
the previous year. This year gives the lowest death rate since 1898 — and 90 
less than in 1922. Of these 334 deaths, 283 in general hospital department 
and 51 in the department for the insane, 60 were from tuberculosis. 

Of the 424 cases of pulmonary tuberculosis in the consumptive ward, 359 cases 
were malas, and 65 females. Classification on admi.ssion was as follows: 
minimal, 19; modei-ately advanced, 115; far advanced, 73. The conditions of 
patients on discharge were as follows: 30 apparently aiTested; 13 quiescent; 
90 improved, 60 died; 30 not relieved. 

Of the 114 births at this institution during the year, 60 were males and 54 
were females. Of this number there were 109 living births, namely, 51 males 



P.D. 17, Part T. 39 

and 58 females. Among the mothers of these children 74 were born in the 
United States, 2 in Ireland, 23 in British Provinces and 15 in other countries. 

For an account of the work of the Department of Public Welfare with 
mother and baby cases at this institution see page 14. 

In the insane department of this institution there was a daily average during 
the year of 723 pei-sons, 219 males and 504 females. There were 51 deaths. 

With an appropriation of $838,700 plus $809.17 brought forward from 
balance of 1922, the total amount available for maintenance was $839,509.17. 
Of this amount $816,165.96 was expended. Of the amount expended, $327,- 
315.62 was for salaries, wages and labor; all other expenses, $488,850.34. 
Weekly per capita cost of maintenance, computed on expense less sales and 
refunds from maintenance, $7,500. Total receipts from all sources other than 
the State treasury, $76,137.82. Net cost of maintenance to the Common- 
Avealth, $740,028.14. Ratio of daily average number of persons employed to 
daily average number of inmates, 1 to 5.1. The Trustees estimate that $932,706 
will be necesary for maintenance in 1924. 

For the coming year the trustees submit the following estimate, with a 
request for special appropriations covering the same : — 



1. Storage Extension 

2. Employees' Quarters 

3. Assistant Physician's House 

4. Industrial Building 



$55,038 GO 
57,863 50 
18,769 50 
67,425 00 

$199,096 00 



ALMSHOUSE DEPARTMENT AT THE STATE FARM, BRIDGEWATER. 

Henry J. Stranx^ Superintendent. 

Provides almshouse care for indigent persons not chargeable to any city or 
town. 

Under chapter 199, General Acts of 1919, this institution was transferred to 
the Bureau of Prisons, now the Department of Correction, August 27, 1919. 
The data following are for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1923 : — 







Numbers 


















Males 


Females Total 


Number December 1, 1922 . 
Admitted during year . 
Discharged during year . 
Remaining November 30, 1923 
Individuals under care during year 
Daily average inmates during year 
Largest census during year . 
Deaths during year 


















245 
173 
204 
214 

260 


1 
2 
3 

3 


246 
175 
207 
2U 
410 
229 
263 
55 



LYMAN SCHOOL FOR BOYS, WESTBOROUGH. 

Charles A. KeeleR;, Superintendent. 

Trustees of Massachusetts Training Schools. 

Mr. James W. McDonald, Marlborough, Chairman. 

Miss Mary Josephine Bleakie, Brookline. 

Mr. Matthew Luce, Cohasset. 

Mr. Clarence J. McKenzie, Winthrop. 

Miss Amy Ethel Taylor, Lexington. 

Mr. Charles M. Davenport, Boston. 

Mr. James D. Henderson, Brookline. 

Mr. Ralph A. Stewai-t, Brookline. 

Mr. Eugene T Connolly, Beverly. 

Mr. Robert J. Watson, 41 Mt. Vernon Street, Boston, Executive Secretary. 



40 



P.D. 17, Part I. 
Normal capacity, 



Tot^l valuatiou of plant, real and pei-sonal, $727,745.12. 
460. Value per unit of capacity, $1,582.05. 

Provides custodial care and industrial training for delinquent boys under 
fifteen years of age. Cott^igie plan. 

Numbers. 





Males 


Females 


Total 


Number December 1. 1922 


390 




390 


Admitted during year 


881 


_ 


881 


Discharged during year 


821 


_ 


S21 


Remaining November 30, 1923 


450 


- 


450 


Individuals under care during year 


894 


_ 


894 


Daily average inmates during year 


407.91 


- 


407.91 


Daily average employees during yejir 


58.87 


44.61 


103 48 


Largest census during year 


463 


_ 


463 


Smallest census during year 


384 


- 


384 



The list of causes of admission in the 881 cases received during the year was 
as follows : breaking and entering, 101 ; delinquent child, 36 ; larceny. 111 ; 
returned from funerals, 9; returned from visits to sick relatives, 5; returned 
from hospitals, 106; returned from places, 397; running away, 13; malicious 
mischief, 7 ; setting fires, 1 ; stubbornnass, 22 ; ringing fire alarm, 3 ; runaways 
captured, 69; placing obstruction on railroad, 1. 

Two hundred ninety-five of the foregoing cases were committed by the 
courts. Of this number, 179 had been arrested before, and 52 had been 
inmates of other institutions. Forty-four, or 14 percent, were of American 
parentage; 165, or 56 percent, were foreign born; and 38 were unknown. 
Eleven of the boys were foreign born, while 284 were born in the United 
States. 

Of the new commitments this year, 66 boys were eleven years of age or 
under. These young iDoys are taken care of in two cottages, one seven miles 
and the other three miles from the main school. They do not mingle with the 
older boys. 

The average leng-th of stay in L^Tiian School of boys paroled for the first 
time during the year ending November 30, 1923, was 11.59 months. 

Of the 822 cases discharged or released during the jesir, 377 were released 
on parole to parents and relatives; on parole to others than relatives, 140; 
boarded out, 85; runaways, 81; sent to hospitals, 107; turned over to 
police, 1; transferred to other institutions, 16; released to funerals, 8; 
released to visit sick relatives, 7. 

With an appropriation of $241,325, a total of $238,956.63 Avas expended 
for the maintenance of this institution. Of the amount expended, $94,591.84 
was for salaries, wages and labor; all other expenses, $144,364.79. Weekly 
per capita cost of maintenance, computed on expense less sales and refunds 
from maintenance, $11,201. Total receipts from all sources other than the 
State treasury, $1,088.67. Net cost of maintenance to the Commonwealth, 
$237,867.96. Ratio of daily average number of persons employed to daily 
average number of inmates, 1 to 3.9. The trustees estimate that $244,800 
will be necessary for maintenance in 1924. 

The boys spend one-half of each day in some educational work which will be 
of service to them when they leave the school. The carpentry class teaches 
sufficient knowledge of carpentry so that many have left the school to work 
with building and manufacturing firms. The printing class issues a school 
paper regularh^ The shoe department manufactures all the shoes and slippers 
for the school and for the Industrial School for Boj^s. 

For the coming year the Trustees submit the following estimate, with 
reuqest for a special appropriation covering the same : — 

Chapel and assembly building, with furnishings and equipment; for service con- 
nections to school building; and for rearrangement of partitions in school 
building to provide more schoolrooms ....... §50,000 



P.D. 17, Part I. 41 

INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, SHIRLEY. 

George P. Campbell, Superintendent. 

Trustees of the Mdssac.iusetts Training Schools. 

Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $613,904.99. Normal capacity 
of plant, 280. Value per unit of capacity, $2,192.51. 

Provides custodial care and industrial training for boys over fifteen and 
under twenty-one years of age. Only boys under eighteen may be admitted. 



Numbers. 








Males 


Females 


Total 


Number December 1, 1922 


230 




230 


Admitted during year 


347 


- 


347 


Discharged during year 


353 


- 


353 


Remaining November 30, 1923 


224 


- 


224 


Individuals under care during year 


530 


- 


530 


Daily average inmates during vear 


210.81 


_ 


210.81 


Daily average emplo.vees during j'ear 


49.80 


18.39 


68.19 


Largest census during year 


240 


_ 


240 


Smallest census during jear 


180 


- 


180 



The list of causes of admission in the 347 cases received during the year was 
as follows : assault, 4 ; assault and battery, 4 ; robbery, 3 ; breaking and enter- 
ing, 27; breaking and entering and larceny, 27; larceny, 76; stubborn, dis- 
obedient and delinquent, 35 ; operating automobile without license, 1 ; vagrancy, 
4; drunkenness, 4; fornication, 1; attempted larceny, 1; selling intoxicating 
liquor, 2; stealing a ride, 3; setting fires, 1; burning a building, 1; unla\vful 
appropriation of automobiles, 17; transfers, 11; returned from parole, 107; 
returned from leave of absence, 5 ; returned from hospital, 6 ; malicious injury 
to real estate, 3 ; runaways, 2 ; transferred from Massachusetts Reformatory, 1 ; 
returned from State Infirmary, 2. 

Two hundred eighteen of the foregoing cases were committed by the courts, 
and 8 were transferred from Lyman School. Of the boys thus committed, 
185 had been in court before, and 47 had been inmates of other institutions. 
Thirty-three, or 14.5 per cent, were foreign born; 194, or 85.4 per cent, 
were bom in the United States. Forty-three were of American parentage, 
120 of foreign parentage, and 12 were of unkno^\Ti parentage. The average 
length of stay of boys in the school Avas 10 and one-half months. The average 
population of 211.80 was less than the average of the preceding year by 65.95. 

Most of these boys are well developed physically, and need much work to 
take care of their surplus energy. The offences for which many of them are 
committed are very serious, and require a strenuous effort to keep the boys 
from developing into criminals. The boys do a great part of the work about 
the large fai-m, and during the past year succeeded in suppljdng the greater 
part of all the food used in the school. 

Of the 353 boj's discharged or released during the year, 237 Avere paroled; 
returned paroles placed out, 79; granted leave of absence, 5; transferred to 
Massachusetts Refonnatory, 3; transfeiTcd to other institutions, not penal, 
12; returned to court, over age, 1; absent without leave, 16. 

With an appropriation of $153,100 plus $412.68 brought forward from 
balance of 1922, the amount available for maintenance was $153,512.68. Of 
this amount $143,131.57 was expended. Of the amount expended, $59,414.66 
was for salaries, wages and labor; all other expenses, $83,716.91. Weekly 
per capita cost of maintenance, computed on expense less sales and refunds 
from maintenance, $12,940. Total receipts from all sources other than the 
State treasury, $1,021.01. Net cost of maintenance to the Commonwealth, 
$142,110.56. Ratio of daih' average number of persons employed to daily 
average number of inmates, 1 to 3.0. The trustees estimate that $156,364.50 
will be necessarv for maintenance in 1924. 



42 



STATE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

Catharine M. Campbell, Superintendent. 



P.D. 17, Part I. 
LANCASTER. 



Trustees of Massachusetts Training Scliools. 

Total valuation of plant, real and pei*sonal, $483,648.52. Normal capacity 
of plant, 268. Value per unit of capacity, $1,804.65. Founded in 1854 as a 
private institution. Taken over ])y the State in 1856. 

Provides custodial care and industrial training for delinquent girls under 
seventeen yeai-s of age at time of c<ommitment. 

Numbers. 





Males 


Females 


Total 


Number December 1, 1922 




272 


272 


Admitted during venr ........... 


_ 


240 


240 


Dischargee! during vear 


_ 


269 


269 


Remaining November 30, 1923 


_ 


243 


243 


Individuals under care during vear 


_ 


461 


461 


Daily average inmates during year 


- 


263.49 


263.49 


Dailv average emplovees during year ........ 


20 


54 


74 


Largest census during vear 


- 


275 


275 


Smallest census during year .......... 


- 


244 


244 



The list of causes of admission for 116 commitments of the 240 cases received 
at the school during the year Avas as follows: being a runaway, 9; delinquent, 
21; adultery, 1; fornication, 10; idle and disorderly, 3; larceny, 10; lewd- 
ness, 7; stubbornness, 51; transfeiTcd from Department of Public Welfare, 1; 
keeping liquor with intent to sell, 1 ; night walking, 1 ; recei\ang stolen 
goods, 1. 

Recalled to the school, 124, — for a visit, 30; for further training, 4; for 
running away from Industrial School, 3; from hospital, 9; for serious causes, 
47; for a visit, 2; from attending court, 3; pending investigation of home 
conditions, 3; to await commitment to institution for feeble-minded, 4; for 
medical care, 13 ; for discipline, 6, 

Of the 269 girls discharged or released during the year, 74 were released on 
parole to parents or relatives; on parole to other families for wages, 121; 
on parole to other families to attend school, 2; from a visit at the school, 30; 
ran from Industrial School, 3; transfei-red to hospital, 30; to be committed 
to Wrentham State School, 3; to board and do other work, 1; from attending 
court, 3; fi-om attending funeral, 2. 

The avei-age length of stay in the school of all girls paroled for the first 
time during the year ending November 30, 1923, Avas 1 year, 10 months and 19 
days. The longer period of training as compared A\ath that in the boys' schools 
enables the superintendent to know the inmates better; gives an opportunitj?- for 
more efficient training and increases the pupil's chances of making good on 
parole. 

Many of the girls are not noi-mal mentally, and for that reason are not proper 
subjects for this school. It is a very difficult thing to transfer these girls 
elsewhere. 

The more backward girls live for the most part in a separate cottage a few 
miles from the main school, and are given training best suited to their par- 
ticular needs. This separation Avithin the institution must continue, pending 
the time when proper classifications can be efi'ected before commitment. 

With an appropriation of $144,800, a total of $136,617.64 AVas expended 
for the maintenance of this institution. Of the amount expended, $57,207.86 
was for salaries, AA'ages and lalx)r; all other expenses, $79,409.78. Weekly per 
capita cost of maintenance, computed on expense less sales and refunds from 
maintenance, $9,921. Total receipts from all sources other than the State 
treasur\', $382.95. Net cost of maintenance to the CommouAvealth, $136,234.69. 



P.D. 17, Part I. 43 

Ratio of daily average number of persons employed to daily average number 
of inmates, 1 to 3.5. The trustees estimate that $154,690 will be necessary for 
maintenance in 1924. 

For the coming year, also, a request for a special appropriation is asked to 
cover the f oUoAvdng : — 



1. Two additional sewer beds; and for reconditioning old ones 



$7,500 



MASSACHUSETTS HOSPITAL SCHOOL, CANTON. 

John E. Fish, M.D., Superintendent. 
Trustees. 

Edward H. Bradford, M.D., Boston, Chairman. 

Mr. Leonard W. Ross, Mattapan, Secretary. 

Mr. Walter C. Baylies, Taunton. 

Mr. William F. Fitzgerald, Brookline. 

Mr. Andrew Marshall, Boston. 

Opened December 1, 1907. Total valuation of plant, real and personal^ 
$653,215.19. Normal capacity of plant, 402. Value per unit of capacity, 
$1,624.91. 

Provides care and schooling for crippled and defonned children. Crippled 
and deformed children of the Commonwealth between ages of five and fifteen, 
and mentally competent to attend the public schools, are eligible for admission. 

Numbers. 



Males Females Total 



Number December 1, 1922 . 
Admitted during year . 
Discharged during year . 
Remaining November 30, 1923 
Individuals under care during year 
Daily average inmates during year 
Daily average employees during year 
Largest census during year . 
Smallest census during year . 



148 
184 
196 
136 

151.31 
35 



147 
168 
176 
139 

146.94 



295 
352 
372 
275 
647 
298.25 
104 
344 
222 



The training of the average cripple is necessarily protracted, and should 
commence as early as possible. Furthermore, the influences which surround 
a crippled child at home are not helpful to a feeling of independence, and 
the work of education should begin at a time when these harmful influences 
have done the least evil. The girls are taught cooking, sewing, general house- 
work, laundering and similar domestic arts as a routine course for all, while 
a few selected cases are assigned to office Avork, the telephone desk, type- 
writing, etc. Farming, gardening, the care of poultry, Avork in the dairy, an 
apprenticeship Avith the baker, engineer, carpenter, painter, storeman, tailor, 
cobbler, chauifeur and other necessary employees, afford educational oppor- 
tunities of A^alue to many of the older boys. 

Seventy-five per cent of the discharged cases are able to maintain creditable 
standing in other schools or are successful Avage earners. Many graduates 
enter public high schools Avithout conditions, and a fcAV have obtained such a 
grasp of scholarship as to giA^e promise of becoming men and Avomen of 
broad culture. It is obvious that heredity and environment are as influential 
in the progress of the cripple as in the progress of children Avithout physical 
handicap, and that the scholastic Avork of the school has been notably success- 
ful is shoAvn by the record of its graduates. This success is largely due to the 
sympathetic prompting to pei-scA^erance given by the teachers Avhen Anthout 
encouragement children fighting against heavy odds Avould liaA^e giA'cn up 
disheartened. 



44 P.D. 17, Part I. 

The school eqiiipment is inadequate to meet the needs of 300 pupils. This 
requires repeated shifts and taxes the teaching power of the instructoi's. 

The Bradford Infirmary, completed in October, 1922, takes care of acute 
surpcal and metlieal cases occurring: in the children -lUnder the Division of 
Child Guardianship of the Department of Public Welfare. Under Chapter 
121, Section 35, of the General Laws, " No State ward who is insane, feeble- 
minded, epileptic, or otherwise unfit shall be admitted to or received at the 
said hosi)ital ", and during: the fii-st year it has been in operation, there has 
been every compliance with the purpose of the law and no indication that the 
Bradford Infirmary will become an asylum for incurables. 

The trustees recommend the following estimates and ask for special appro- 
priation covering same : • — 



1. Tile floor in administration building kitchen . 

2. Installation of brass pipe for hot water, recirculating system 

3. Furnishing nurses' home ...... 

4. Two fire-proof cottages ...... 

5. Filtration sewage bed ....... 

6. School house ........ 



$860 

2.300 

1,000 

130,000 

600 

65,000 

$199,760 



With an appropriation of $172,035 plus $150.62 brought forward from 
balance of 1922, the total amount available for maintenance Avas $172,185.62. 
Of this amount, $169,373.30 was expended. Of the amount expended, $84,- 
928.73 was for salaries, wages and labor; $84,444.57 for all other expenses. 
Weekly per capita cost of maintenance, computed on expense less sales and 
refunds from maintenance, $10,865. Total receipts from all sources other 
than the State treasury, $54,071.58. Net cost of maintenance to the Com- 
monwealth, $115,301.72. Ratio of daily average number of persons employed 
to dailj- average number of inmates, 1 to 2.8. The trustees estimate the sum 
of $187,362.80 for maintenance in 1924. 

SUPERVISION OF INSTITUTIONS. 

The Department of Public Welfare, in its supervision over the five insti- 
tutions, has always insisted upon the fact that these institutions exist for the 
benefit of their inma^tes. In its inspections the proper care of the inmates has 
been the first consideration. Housing, food and its preparation, clothing, 
medical care, employment, training and healthful recreation are carefully 
watched. 

Each of the five institutions is an integi-al part of one of the divisions 
of the Depai-tment and is used by that division for its special needs under the 
guidance of departmental policy. As the work of each institution is closely 
connected with the work of the various municipalities and the private charitable 
agencies, the departmental policy binds together a comprehensive and complete 
program for all activities dealing with Public Welfare. 

In the matter of financial supervision the Department examines and analyzes 
institution expenditures, keeping constantly in mind the function of the insti- 
tution and the relation of its business to the care, education, and welfare of 
the inmates. Joint purchasing formerly done by institutions has been taken 
over by the Commission on Administration and Finance, the greater portion 
of institution supplies being purchased by that Commission. 

Capacity^ Population and Inventory. 

The following tables are designed to show in detail the financial condition of 
each institution. A convenient summary of the State's property represented 
by each institution is followed by a comparison of all appropriations and the 
expenditures made therefrom. 



P.D. 17, Part I. 
Table I. — Part 



45 
I. — Capacities and Population of the Five Institutions for the 
Fiscal Year ending November 30, 1923. 



INSTITUTIONS 


Normal 
Capacity 


Largest 
Number 
present 

at 

Any One 

Time 


Smallest 
Number 
present 

at 

Any One 

Time 


Daily 
Average 
Number 
present 

during 

the Year 

1923 


Daily 
Average 
Number 
present 

during 

the Year 

1922 


Daily 
Average 
Number 
present 

during 

the Year 

1921 


State Infirmary 

Lyman School for Boys .... 
Industrial School for Boys .... 
Industrial School for Girls .... 
Massachusetts Hospital School . 


2,490 
460 
280 
268 
402 


2,417 
463 
240 
275 
344 


1,828 
384 
180 
244 
222 


2,080.87 
407.91 
210.81 
263.49 
298.25 


2,337 
442 
277 
292 
270 


2,297 
467 
288 
303 
279 


Totals 


3,900 


3,739 


2,858 


3,261.33 


3,618 


3,634 



Table I. — Part II. — Inventory of the Five Institutions, November 30, 1923. 





Real and Personal Estate 


INSTITUTIONS 


Land 


Buildings 


Personal 
Property 


Total 




Acres 


Value 


Value 


State Infirmary .... 
Lyman School for Boys 
Industrial School for Boys . 
Industrial School for Girls . 
Massachusetts Hospital School . 


794.00 
453,25 
890.00 
269.00 
165.72 


$71,917 50 
42,073 17 
27,375 00 
14,355 00 
33,132 32 


$1,856,224 42 
507,520 00 
468,976 00 
382,804 16 
515,838 54 


$397,599 61 
178,151 95 
117,553 99 
86,489 36 
104,244 33 


$2,325,741 53 
727,745 12 
613,904 99 
483,648 52 
653,215 19 


Totals 


2,571.97 


$188,852 99 


$3,731,363 12 


$884,039 24 


$4,804,255 35- 



II. Receipts. 

Table II is designed to show every item of income to each institution from 
whatever source, for whatever purpose, excepting certain private funds, cast- 
ing all together for ready comparison. The tabulation also shows such of the 
receipts as under the law are available for maintenance purposes in 1924. 
According to this table the total receipts from all sources were $1,892,460.02. 
Of this amount, $1,759,757.99 was received from the State treasury, and the 
remainder, $132,702.03 came in on account of the institution, through board of 
patients, sale of products or otherwise. Of this latter figure, $53,450.34 is 
available for maintenance purposes in 1924. 



4t) 



P.D. 17, Part I. 



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P.D. 17, Part I. 47 

III. EXPEXDITURES. 

Table III, di^^ded into three parts, shows all expenditures of whatever 
Dature on account of the several institutions. Part I deals with maintenance 
only. Part II exhibits outlays for special purposes, divided into four head- 
ings, namely, " land," " buildings," " funiishing and equipping," and " miscel- 
laneous." Part III summarizes Parts I and II, and adds thereto the amounts 
expended from trust funds held by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth. 

The table shows that $1,504,245.10 was spent for maintenance, exclusive of 
expenditures for special purposes mentioned in Part II, which amounted to 
$255,496.89. 

In addition to the expenditures as above indicated, two institutions — Lyman 
School for Boys and the Industrial School for Girls — have private trust funds 
which are administered for the benefit of inmates, but independently of the 
State's investment. The custody of e^ch is vested in the State Treasurer, 
whose duty it is to invest the same and to pay therefrom at the request of 
the tnistees. Three of these trusts — the LjTuan fund, the Lj-man trust fund 
and the Lamb fund — apply to Lyman School for Boys, while the Fay, the 
Mar^' Lamb and the Rogei-s book fund pei-tain to the Industrial School for 
Girls. From these sources a total of $16.00 was expended during the year. 
By adding to the amounts given ($16.00) for trust funds, as sho\\'n in Part 
III, we find a grand total of $1,759,757.99 expended on account of the five 
institutions. 



4» 



P.D. 17, Part I. 



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P.D. 17, Part I. 49 

Table III. — Part II. — Expenditures of the Five Institutions for the Fiscal 

Year ending November 30, 1923 — Continued. 







For Special Purposes 


INSTITUTIONS 


Land 


Buildings 


Furnishing 

and 
equipping 


'Ss^- Total 


State Infixmary 

Lyman School for Boys .... 
Industrial School for Boys .... 
Industrial School for Girls . . . 
Massachusetts Hospital School 


- 


$157,454 46 
42,215 24 
26,682 55 

25,105 35 


- 
$3,524 41 


$157,454 46 

- ■■ 42,215 24 

- ; 26,682 55 

- ! 3,524 41 
$514 88 j 25,620 23 


Totals 


_ 


$251,457 60 


$3,524 41 


$514 88 ! $255,496 89 

1 



Table III. — Part III. — Summary of Expenditures for the Fiscal Year ending 
Xovemher 30, 1923 — Concluded. 



INSTITUTIONS 



Maintenance 



Special 
Purposes 



Trust Funds 



Total 



State Infirmary 
Lyman School for Boys 
Industrial School for Boys . 
Industrial School for Girls . 
Massachusetts Hospital School 

Totals .... 



$816,165 96 1 


$157,454 46 


_ 


$973,620 42 


238,956 63 [ 


42,215 24 


$16 00 


281,187 87 


143,131 57 . 


26,682 55 


_ 


169,814 12 


136,617 64 1 


3,524 41 


- 


140,142 05 


169,373 30 


25,620 23 


- 


194,993 53 


$1,504,245 10 


$255,496 89 


$16 00 


$1,759,757 99 



IV. Per Capita Cost. 

Table IV shows for each of the five institutions the total cost of maintenance. 
It further shoTvs all receipts from sales or refunds; the difference, which is the 
net cost to the institutions; and the average net weekly per capita cost to the 
institution, ^dth a column showing the corresponding per capita for the three- 
year period just ended. 



50 



P.D. 17, Part I. 






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P.D. 17, Part I. 51 

V. Pay Roll. 

The table shows the daily average number employed in 1922 and 1923, vnth the 
same average for the three-year period ending November 30, 1922. The same 
treatment is given the average monthly compensation and the weekly per 
capita cost. The total average number employed was 689.767, while for the 
three-year period preceding 1923 it was 668.030, and 697.524 in 1922. The total 
average monthly compensation paid was $367,875, as against $349,674 in the 
preceding three-year period, and $357,558 in 1922. Miscellaneous and inci- 
dental employment not entered upon the payrolls of the institutions does not 
appear in this tabulation. 



52 



P.D. 17, Part I. 











For 
the Three 

Years 
1920. 1921 
and 1922 


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P.D. 17, Part I. 53 

THE COUNTY TRAINING SCHOOLS. 

Under the provisions of General Laws, chapter 77, section 2, the five county 
training schools for truants and habitual school offenders are subject to the 
visitation of this Department, Avhich is required to report thereon in its annual 
report. The schools are as follows : — 

Essex County Training School, Lawrence. 
Hampden County Training School, Springfield. 
Middlesex County Training School, North Chelmsford. 
Norfolk, Bristol and Plymouth Union Training School, Walpole. 
Worcester County Training School, Oakdale (West Boylston). 

The accompanying table shows the numbers and the movement of the popula- 
tion in these institutions for the fiscal year ending December 31, 1923, and also 
the average weekly per capita cost of maintenance, $10.85, subtracting all 
receipts from private sources. 

As will be seen from the table there were 485 children in the five schools 
during 1923. The year opened mth 296. In the succeeding twelve months 
189 were admitted and 184 were discharged, leaving 301 in residence at the 
close of the year. This figure is 5 more than the coiTesponding number for 
1922. 

The average age of the children at the time of their admittance was twelve 
years, eleven months, five days. Every child must be discharged, by require- 
ment of the statute, upon reaching the age of sixteen. 



54 



P.D. 17, Part I. 



Average 
Weekly 
Per Cap- 
ita Cost 
of main- 
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Schools 


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P.D. 17, Part T. 55 

SUPERVISION OF THE SETTLED POOR RELIEVED OR SUPPORTED 

BY CITIES AND TOWNS. 

The City and Town Poor. 

Under General Laws, chapter 117, sections 3, 36, 37, and 38, and chapter 121, 
section 16, the Department of Public Welfare is required to visit all places 
where poor persons are supported in families by cities and towns and all 
children who are supported by cities and to^\^ls. Children illegally retained in 
city or town almshouses must be removed therefrom and placed at board at 
the expense of the city or town concerned. 

The Settled Adult Poor provided for in Families. 

Of the 226 adult poor persons reported by local authorities as fully sup- 
ported in families on January 1, 1923, 27 had died and 4 had been removed 
before visits could be made. The remaining 195 — 92 men and 103 women — 
were all visited and reported on by the Department's agents. They were 
supported by 99 cities and towns as follows : — 



Abington , 


. 2 


Gardner 


3 


Quincy 






2 


Agawam 


1 


Gill . 


1 


Raynham 






1 


Amherst 


. 2 


Granby 


1 


Reading 






1 


Arlington . 


. 2 


Great Barrington 


7 


Rehoboth 






3 


Ashland 




Groton 


1 


Revere 






6 


Athol 




Hadley 


1 


Royalston 






2 


Attleboro . 




Hamilton , 


1 


Salisbury 






2 


Belmont 




Hardwick . 


2 


Sandisfield 






1 


Berlin 




Hinsdale 


3 


Scituate 






2 


Bourne 


; 3 


Hull . 


1 


Sharon 








Braintree . 


. 5 


Lanesborough 


2 


Sheffield 








Brewster 


. 3 


Lawrence . 


4 


Southbridge 








Carlisle 


. 2 


Leverett 


1 


Southwick 








Charlemont 


1 


Littleton . 


1 


Stow . 








Charlton 


. 2 


Ludlow 


1 


Sunderland 








Chatham . 


. 4 


Marion 


2 


Topsfield 








Chelsea 


1 


Marlborough 


1 


Waltham 








Chicopee 


. 2 


Medfield . 


1 


Wareham 








Clarksburg . 


1 


Melrose 


1 


Warwick 








Cummington 


1 


Mendon 


1 


Watertown 








Dal ton 


1 


Merrimac . 


6 


Webster 








Danvers 


. 7 


Needham . 


2 


Wellfleet 








Dedham 


1 


New Marlborough 


1 


Wellesley 








Deerfield . 


. 1 


Newton 


1 


Weston 








Dighton 


. 2 


North Adams 


1 


West Newbury 






Dracut 


1 


Northampton 


1 


West Stockbridge 






Dudley 


. 2 


Northborough 


2 


West Tisbury 






Edgartown , 


. 4 


Northfield . 


1 


Weymouth . 






Enfield 


1 


Oak Bluffs . 


2 


Whitman . 






Erving 


1 


Orange 


3 


Winchester 




2 


Everett 


. 3 


Pittsfield . 


1 


Winthrop . 




2 


Falmouth , 


1 


Plainville . 


2 


Woburn 




5 


Fitchburg . 


1 


Provincetown 


1 


Yarmouth 






1 



Their ages were as f ollo^ys : two between 20 and 30 ; two between 30 and 40 ; 
fourteen between 40 and 50 ; seventeen between 50 and 60 ; thirty-eight between 
GO and 70; seventy between 70 and 80; forty-five between 80 and 90; six 
between 90 and 100; and one over 100. For their support they Avere paid 
in three cases under $2 per week; in 5 oases from $2 to $3 per week; in 17 
cases from $3 to $4 per week; and 170 cases — mostly of old and feeble 
pei'sons — the rate varied from $4 to $15 per week according to the amount 
of care required. Of the whole number, 55 per cent were reported in good 
or fairly good physical condition and 90 per cent in good mental condition. 
In every case they were apparently receiving good care. There were 68 able 
to do light work either in the house or about the premises. In 171 cases, 
according to the reports, the overseers of the poor complied with the law 
requiring them to visit these persons at least once in every six months. In 
the remaining 25 eases no record of visits was found. 



56 P.D. 17, Part I. 

Dependent Minor Children with Settlement provided for in Alms- 
houses. 

Visits were made in the cases of 137 cliildren — 54 boys and 83 girls — 
reported to be cared for by the following cities and towns in their almshouses: 



Boston 


. 91 


Lawrence 


. 3 


Springfield . 


. 15 


East Hampton 


2 


Lynn . 


1 


Warren 


1 


Fall River . 


7 


Norwell 


1 


Watertown 


. 3 


Gardner 


1 


Oxford 


1 


Woburn 


1 


Holyoke 


. 3 


Somerset 


1 


Worcester . 


6 



In addition to this number, 71 had been removed from the almshouses before 
the time of visitation. Of the number visited, 80 were so defective in mind or 
body as to make their retention in an almshouse desirable. 

Dependent Minor Children with Settlement provided for Outside of 

Almshouses. 

As shown by the Department's visitation of the 1,336 children reported by 
the local authorities as fully vsupported outside the almshouses on January 1, 
1923 and July 1, 1923, two had died and two hundred sixty-four had been 
removed before visits could be made; six were earning their own living and two 
were working for small wages and receiving partial support from the town. 
The remaining 1,062 — 523 boys and 539 girls — were supported by 90 cities 
and towns as follows : — 



Abington 

Amherst 

Andover 

Attleboro 

Barnstable . 

Barre . 

Belmont 

Beverly 

Billerica 

Bolton 

Boston 

Bourne 

Braintree 

Brockton 

Brookline . 

Cambridge . 

Chatham 

Chelsea 

Chicopee 

Clarksburg . 

Clinton 

Dalton 

Dan vers 

Dartmouth 

Dedham 

Dighton 

Easthampton 

Easton 

Enfield 

Essex . 



1 
2 
3 
3 
2 
5 
1 
9 
2 
4 
581 

10 
2 

13 
8 

17 
2 
6 

14 
2 
1 
1 
2 
2 
2 
4 
3 
1 
1 
3 



Everett 


2 


Needham . 


. 2 


Fairhaven . 


1 


New Bedford 


. 55 


Fall River . 


2 


Newbuiyport 


. 2 


Falmouth 


1 


Norwood 


. 9 


Fitchburg 


1 


Quincy 


7 


Framingham 


5 


Revere 


. 3 


Gardner 


5 


Rockland . 


. 4 


Gloucester . 


4 


Royalston . 


1 


Great Barrington 


3 


Rutland 


1 


Hardwick 


4 


Salem 


. 8 


Hawley 


2 


Salisbury . 


. 3 


Hopkinton . 


1 


Saugus 


1 


Hull . 


4 


Sharon 


. 2 


Huntington 


5 


Somerville . 


. 19 


Kingston 


2 


Southbridge 


. 21 


Lawrence . 


24 


Sutton 


. 2 


Ludlow 


1 


Templeton . 


1 


Lynn . 


18 


Tewksbury 


1 


Maiden 


5 


Waltham 


. 4 


Mansfield . 


1 


Wareham . 


. 8 


Marblehead 


5 


Warren 


. 2 


Marlborough 


1 


Watertown . 


. 8 


Marshfield . 


1 


Webster 


. 5 


Maynard 


4 


Wellfleet . 


4 


Methuen 


2 


West Springfield . 


. 4 


Milford 


3 


Westfield . 


7 


Millbury 


1 


Weymouth . 


. 2 


Millville . 


4 


Winchendon 


. 2 


Nantucket . 


1 


Winthrop . 


. 2 


Natick 


2 


Worcester . 


50 



Of the whole number 76 were cared for and treated in public and private 
hospitals and asylums. There were 750 who attended school, and 318 w^ho did 
more or less work about the house. Of the whole number 1,034 w^ere in good 
or fairly good physical condition, and 1,015 in good or fairly good mental 
condition. The price of board varied from $1.25 to $8.50 per week. These 
children were found to be well cared for with a few exceptions, which have 
been brought to the attention of the local overseers. 



P.D. 17, Part I. 57 

The Penalty incurred by Certain Cities and Towns for Failure to make 

THEIR Returns for Poor Relief during the Month of April^ 1923. 

Under Sections 32-35 of Chapter 117 of the General Laws, the Department 
reported to the Treasurer of the Commonwealth the names of the cities and 
towns that failed to make their pauper returns during the month of April. 1923, 
together Adth the amount of penalty incurred in each instance as follows: 
Agawam, $49; Avon, $9; Belmont, $9; Berkley, $2; Blandford, $9; Bolton, 
$65; Clarksburg, $11; Conway, $8; Cummington, $9; Deerfield, $8; East 
Bridgewater, $8; Easton, $2;^ Hanover, $14; Harvard, $9; Harwich, $6 
Holliston, $9; Huntington, $1; Leverett, $6; Marion, $6; Mashpee, $13 
Medford, $14; Merrimac, $8; Xahant, $2; Xewbur^-port, $9; Norton, $1 
Oak Bluffs, $9; PhTupton, $1; Saugus, $6; Shelburne, $63; Topsfield, $3 
Templet on, $49 ; Wayland, $9; Webster, $8; Wellesley, $2; W. Boylston, $14 
Wilbraham, $49. 

LAWS AFFECTING THE DEPARTMENT, PASSED BY THE LEGISLA- 
TURE OF 1923. 

Chapter 26 of the Acts of 1923 changes the name of the Overseers of the 
Poor in certain cities and towns to the Board of Public Welfare. Chapter 177, 
Acts of 1923, increases from three cents a mile to twelve cents a mile the rate 
of reimbursement to cities and to^vns for the expense of transportation of 
state paupers to the State Infinnary for the excess over thirty miles by the 
usual route. Chapter 298, Acts of 1923, increases the state allowance for the 
funeral expenses of certain paupei-s. Chapter 434, Acts of 1923, authorizes 
the State Board for Vocational Education to furnish aid during rehabilitation 
to certain persons and pro\'ides that, upon request, the Department of Public 
Welfare shall make an investigation and a report to the said Board regarding 
the circumstances of persons who apply for such aid. Chapter 58 of the 
Resolves of 1923 relates to a special commission of which the Commissioner 
of Public Welfare was a member. 

Chapter 26. 

An Act changing the Name of the Overseers of the Poor in Certain 
Cities and Towns to the Board of Public Welfare. 

Whereas, It is desirable that this act take effect forthwith, in order that it 
may be acted upon at the cuiTent to'\\Ti meetings, therefore it is hereby declared 
to be an emergency law, necessary for the immediate preservation of the public 
convenience. 

Be it en<icted, etc., as follows: 

Chapter forty-one of the General Laws is hereby amended by inserting after 
section thirty-four the following new section : — Section 34A. In any city 
or town accepting this section, in a city by vote of the city council or in a 
town by vote of the voters thereof, the overseers of the poor shall thereafter be 
known as the board of public welfare; but said change of name shall in no 
respect affect the rights, powers, duties or tenure of office of said overseers. 
This section shall not apply to a city or town in which the overseers of the 
poor are incorporated. [Approved February 20, 1923. 

Chapter 177. 

An Act relative to the Reimbursement of Cities and Towns for Expenses 
incurred in transporting Certain Paupers to the State Infirmary. 

Be it enacted, etc., as folloivs: 

Section fifteen of chapter one hundred and twenty-two of the General Laws 
is hereby amended by striking out, in the seventh line, the word " three " 
and inserting in place thereof the word : — twelve, — so as to read as follows : 



58 P.D. 17, Part I. 

— Section 15. Towns may at their own expense send to the state infirmary, to 
be maintained at the public eharjje, all paupers falling into distress therein 
and having: no settlement within the commonwealth. The town shall be reim- 
bui^eti by the commonwealth, upon bills approved by the department, for the 
expense of transport^ition of each state pauper so sent, for the excess over 
thirty miles by the usual route, at a rate not exceeding twelve cents a mile. 
[Approved March 28, 1923. 

Chapter 298. 

An Act increasing the State Allowance for the Funeral Expenses of 

Certain Pax^pers. 
Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section seventeen of chapter one hundred and seventeen of the General 
Ivaws is hereby amended by striking out, in the tenth line, the Avord " thirty " 
and by inserting in place thereof the word : — forty, — by striking out, in the 
eleventh and twelfth lines, the word " fifteen " and inserting in place thereof 
the word : — twenty, — and by striking out all after the word " commonwealth " 
in the thirteenth line and inserting in place thereof the words : — ; provided, 
that the ovei-seers shall file with each claim an affidavit of the undertaker 
stating the total amount of his bill, the amount received from the town and 
the amount received from all other sources; and provided, further, that if the 
total expense of the burial, by whomsoever incurred, shall exceed the sum of 
one hundred dollai's, no payment therefor shall be made by the commonwealth, 

— so as to read as follows : — Section 17. The overseers of each town shall 
also relieve and support and may employ all poor persons residing or found 
therein, having no lawful settlements within the commonwealth, until their 
removal to the state infinnary, and if they die shall decently bury them. They 
shall also decently bury all deceased persons who, although without means of 
support while living, did not apply for public relief, and all unknown persons 
found dead. The expense thereof may be recovered of their kindred, if any, 
chargeable by law for their support in the manner provided in this chapter; 
and if the expense of their burial is not paid by such kindred, an amount not 
exceeding forty dollars for the funeral expenses of each pauper over twelve 
years of age, and not exceeding twenty dollars for the funeral expenses of each 
pauper under that age, shall be paid by the commonwealth ; provided, that the 
overseers shall file with each claim an affidavit of the undertaker stating the 
total amount of his bill, the amount received from the town and the amount 
received from ail other sources ; and provided, further, that if the total expense 
of the burial, by whomsoever incurred, shall exceed the sum of one hundred 
dollai's, no pajinent therefor shall be made by the commonwealth. [Approved 
April 23, 1923. 

Chapter 434. 

An Act authorizing the State Board for Vocational Education to fur- 
nish Aid during Rehabilitation to Certain Persons. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Chapter seventy-four of the General LaAvs is hereby amended by inserting 
after section twenty-two A, inserted by section six of chapter four hundred 
and sixty-4;wo of the acts of nineteen hundred and twenty-one, the folloAving 
new section : — Section 22B. Said state board for vocational education may 
expend, under rules and regulations made by it and approved by the governor 
and council, such sums, not exceeding ten thousand dollars, as may be annually 
appropriated therefor, for the purpose of furnishing aid during rehabilitation 
to such persons as it shall deem able to profit by training. 

The department of public welfare shall, upon request of said board, make an 
investigation of the circumstances of persons, actually in training afforded 
by said board, who apply for aid dunng rehabilitation under the provisions of 
this section, and shall make a report of its findings to said board. [Approved 
May 22, 1923. 



P.D. 17, Part I. 69 

Chapter 58 — Resolves 1923. 

Resolve relatr^ to an Investigation of the Advisability of providing a 
Limitation of Exemptions from Local Taxation of Certain Property. 

Resolved^ That a special commission is hereby established, to consist of the 
commissioner of education, the commissioner of public welfare and the com- 
missioner of corporations and taxation, which shall investigate and report to 
the general court, not later than the second Wednesday in eTanuary, nineteen 
hundred and twenty-four, as to the advisability of providing by law for 
limiting the operation of the exemption from local taxation, contained in 
clause Third of section five of chapter fifty-nine of the General Laws, to 
institutions chartered under the laws of this commonwealth, the assets of which 
are permanently held for and devoted to one or more of the public uses stated 
in said clause, and more pai"ticularly as to the ad\T.sability of providing by law 
for excluding from the operation of such exemption institutions so incorporated 
as to have a capital stock, divided into shares or otherwise, owned in such 
manner that the assets thereof may be sold or the property thereof diverted, 
by dissolution of the corporation or otherwise, from the public purpose for 
which the institution was chartered and pass to private ownership or advantage. 
Any recommendations made in such report shall be accompanied by drafts of 
legislation embodying the same. [Approved May 17, 1923. 



60 



P.D. 17, Part I. 



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64 P.D. 17, Part II. 

Part II. 
PRIVATE CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 

Government supervision of private charitable corporations is provided in 
three legislative enactments, the first of which requires the Department of 
Public Welfare to investigate all petitions for charitable charters, while the 
second and third call for annual inspection and annual reporting. In the 
following pages of this part of the report the functions of the Department and 
the year's work under these several statutes are explained. This statement 
is followed by a tabulation of some of the essential figures showing the financial 
condition and the Avork done by the various charities. 

During the year ending November 30, 1923, 74 applications for charters 
have been referred to this Department by the Secretary of the Commonwealth 
for investigation, under General Laws, Chapter 180, Section 6. In 11 cases 
the petitions were withdrawn from this Department before the hearing. Three 
e-ase« were pending action of this Department at beginning of the year and 
one case was pending action of the Secretary of State at beginning of the year. 
Four cases are pending action of the Secretary of State at end of the year. 
Eight other cases are pending action of this Department at end of the year. 
This Department has investigated, given hearings and reported on 58 appli- 
cations, including 3 received prior to the beginning of the year and 4 which 
had not been acted upon by the Secretary of State. Fifty-five applications as 
listed below, have been acted upon by the Secretary of the Commonwealth. 

American Women's Overseas League of New England, Inc. 

The Boston Association for the Prevention and Relief of Heart Disease, Inc. 

The Boston Ladies Auxiliary of the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, Inc. 

Boston National Elks 1924 Convention Association. 

Boston Tercentennial Association, Inc. 

Boys Club of Brockton. 

Cambridge Masonic Club, Inc. 

Charles D. Meserve Fund, Inc. 

The Christian Industrial Institute (Inc.). 

Citizens' Committee on Conservation, Inc. 

Commonwealth Charitable Corporation. 

Community Service of Brockton Inc. 

Daughters of Jacob Free Loan Association. 

Directory for "Wet Nurses, Inc. 

The E. E. Knapp Camp Association, Inc. 

Employees' Fund, Incorporated. 

The Finnish Workingmen's Association of West Wareham. 

Fraternite Franco-Americaine, Worcester Branch, Inc. 

Frederika Home, Inc. 

Friends of Medical Progress, Inc. 

General Charles Devens Post Number 282, Department of Massachusetts, The American 

Legion. 
The Greenfield Visiting Nurse Association, Inc. 
Hairenik Association. 

Hartsuff Post Memorial Association, Incorporated. 
Hebrew Ladies' Beneficial Fund, Inc. 
The Helicon Inc. 
Holyoke Community Field, Inc. 
Holyoke Hebrew Free Loan Society. 
Holyoke Junior Achievement Foundation, Inc. 
Hopital Louis Pasteur. 

Independent Congress Association, Inc. of Chelsea. 
The Jewish Educational Center, Inc. 
Jewish Women's College Club, Inc. 

John G. Jones Grand Chapter of the Order of Eastern Star. 
Knights of Columbus Civic Institute of Quincy, Mass. 
The Ladies Immigration Sheltering Aid Society Inc. 
The Lewis Society Inc., of Boston and Vicinity. 
Little Building Benefit Association. 

The Lucy Wheelock Kindergarten AlumniB Association, Incorporated. 
Marlborough Cummunity Service, Inc. 
Mary Aranda Memorial Hospital, Inc. 
Massachusetts Civic League. 
Massachusetts Osteopathic Hospital, Inc. 
Massachusetts Tuberculosis League Inc. 



P.D. 17, Part II. 65 

The Newcomb Home for Old Ladies of Norton, Massachusetts. 

Notre Dame Social Service Foundation, Incorporated. 

Pan-Hellenic Relief Organization, Inc. 

Polish Students' Club of Boston. 

Sacred Heart Home. 

Society of the Divine Word. 

South Stoughton Community Service, Inc. 

United Associates, Incorporated. 

Wellesley Hospital Fund, Incorporated. 

West Newton Memorial Library Association, Inc. 

The Worcester Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. 

Forty-nine of the above petitions have been granted and charters issued, 
Avhile 6 have been refused. 

During the thirteen years and nine months which have elapsed since the 
passage of the law (March 1, 1910, to November 30, 1923) 870 petitions have 
been refen-ed to this Department. The Department has reported upon 760 
applications for charters, 669 of which were granted and 81 refused; 3 had 
been withdrawn and 7 had not been acted upon by the Secretary of the Com- 
monwealth up to November 30, 1923. In 89 other cases the applications were 
withdrawn before the report was made. Twelve cases are still pending in 
the Department. 

General Laws, Chapter 121, Section 7, requires the Department of Public 
Welfare to make annual inspection of charitable corporations which consent 
to said inspection. 

Two hundred and eighty-six inspections have been made during the past 
year, involving numerous conferences with directors and many visits to insti- 
tutions. 

There have been 452 inquiries in regard to particular charities and general 
matters connected with the field of private charity. 

Of the 977 charitable corporations which made returns to this Department 
during 1923, 109 are homes for the aged; 118 are child-helping agencies; 
208 are hospitals or other institutions for aiding the sick; 133 are agencies 
giving family aid; and 134 are organizations doing neighborhood and club 
work. The remaining 275 corporations form a miscellaneous group chiefly 
civic or eleemosynary in their nature. 

An analysis of the returns made in 1923 shows the total property, real and 
personal, of all these charities to be $155,118,393.25. Incumbrances on real 
estate came to but $4,565,093.78. Subscriptions, donations and entei-tainments 
brought in $12,540,126.86. Earnings and refunds, including receipts from 
beneficiaries amounted to $15,286,985.58. Legacies were received to the amount 
of $5,768,359.06; of this sum $2,166,855.32 was unrestricted. The cuiTent 
expenditures were $32,828,146.53, of which $6,086,198.09 was paid for salaries 
and wages. As hospital salaries and Avages are not reported separately, they 
are not included in the last amount. These agencies reported 154,108 paid 
employees. 

General Laws, Chapter 180, Section 12, provides that every charitable corpo- 
ration must make to this Department an annual financial return on or before the 
first day of November in each year, and further provides that if any corpora- 
tion fails for two successive years to make the report, the Supreme Court may 
decree its dissolution. 

The Department of Public Welfare endorses no private charitable organiza- 
tion or agency. This rule is absolute, regardless of the known standing of any 
such society. Inspection and the publication of the annual return in this 
volume do not mean approval ; on the contrary, inspection may mean the dis- 
covery of conditions calling for condemnation. No agency is warranted, 
therefore, in using the fact of inspection in such manner as to lead the public 
to believe that the Department has approved or in any sense commends its 
work. 

Figures from the financial reports of corporations for the last year are 
given on the follo^ving pages.. The abstracts are arranged by towns in alpha- 
betical order under each towTi. 



66 



P.D. 17, Part II. 
Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Total 
Property 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 



Subscrip- 
tions, Dona- 
tions, etc. 



Abington Y 



Abington. 
M. C. A. 



Adams 
Polish Roman Catholic Society of St. Stanislaw 
Kostka of Adams ...... 

Sisters of Providence (Greylock Rest) 

Amesbury. 
Amesbury and Salisbury Home for Aged Women 
Amesbury Hospital Association, The 
Ladies' Charitable Society of Amesbury . 
Young Men's Christian Association of Amesbury ' 

Amherst. 
Amherst Home for Aged Women 

Andover. 
Andover Guild ....... 

Andover Home for Aged People 

Arlington. 
Arlington Training School for Nurses, Inc.. The 
Order of St. Anne (.St. John's House for Children) 
Symmes Arlington Hospital .... 



Athol. 
Athol Memorial Hospital 
Athol Y. M. C. A. 



Attleboro. 
Associated Charities of Attleboro, Inc. 
Attleborough Hospital , The 

Attleboro League for Girls and Women, 

Attleboro Springs, Inc. i . . . 
Attleboro Y. M. C. A. ... 



Inc. 



Auburn. 
Auburn District Nursing Association, Inc., The 

Avon. 
Lutheran Orphans' Home Board, Incorporated, 
The 



Ayer. 
Ayer Hospital Association ' . . . . 

Barnstable. 
Cape Cod Hospital ...... 

Hyannis Normal Students' Permanent Loan 
Fund Company 



Stetson Home 



Barre. 



Belmont. 
Belmont Community Nursing Association 

Berlin. 
Elizabeth Rector Harper Bungalow for Destitute 
Children, Incorporated . . . . . 



Beverly. 
Beverly Female Charitable Society 

Beverly Fuel Society . 
Beverly Hospital Corporation 
Beverly School for the Deaf 
Country Week Association . 

Fisher Charitable Society . 

Old Ladies' Home Society . 
Y. M. C. A. of Beverly 

Billerica. 
Pines Community Association, The 



$25,000 00 


18,091 72 


44.100 00 


57,913 33 
24.096 11 
10,096 78 


43,957 54 


_3 

102,511 76 


-3 

98,400 00 
154,716 96 


175,000 00 


265,801 67 


15,000 00 


130,000 00 


37,216 36 


46,400 00 

-3 


368,275 00 


4,664 21 


12,500 00 


14,028 00 


23,805 42 
635,883 25 
115,000 00 

75,000 00 


60,606 34 


147,437 27 
190,000 00 


1,000 00 



13,500 00 
21,800 00 



740 00 
24,000 00 



12,000 00 



54.300 00 

600 00 



$4,550 00 


1,688 91 


1,313 00 

17,388 93 

68 00 


355 19 


2,038 93 
59 00 


9.309 73 
2,662 12 


1,544 16 
11,078 95 


4,405 04 
1,608 50 


2,121 32 


4,726 25 


1,519 90 


6,355 23 


64,426 51 


1,282 05 


925 50 


136 41 


24,412 84 


3,500 00 


1,001 18 
15,729 51 


102 67 



No report. 



2 Organizations aided. 



P.D. 17, Part II. 

Charitable Corporations 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 



specifically 
restricted 
to Capital 



Unrestricted 
Legacies 



Current 
Expenditures 



Salaries 

and 

Wages 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Total 

Number 

aided 



Total 

Number 

Free 



Number 

of 

Families 

aided 



$965 75 



592 50 



2,066 18 
599 42 
441 08 



2,167 34 



226 02 
4,190 11 



248 66 
537 34 



27 77 
10,155 10 

724 25 


1,952 39 


8 16 



87 63 

986 72 
33 91 

15,111 99 

214 55 

251 85 

1,295 45 

11,424 46 

4,397 36 

15 25 

3,439 24 

6,822 55 
5,663 05 



$2,000 00 



$1,900 00 



3,200 00 
5,000 00 



450 00 



5,013 33 



82,527 67 



2,059 18 



350 00 



33,150 00 



$6,310 16 

5,960 80 
28,921 81 



4,322 44 
271 30 
457 22 



3,094 03 



4,725 36 
4,675 01 



8,508 22 
11.805 12 
44,003 42 



3,775 24 
20,194 06 



5,208 17 
37,742 48 

5,478 52 
14,165 71 

1,462 90 
12,287 22 



925 50 



418 26 

892 20 

119,993 94 

25,965 63 

3,508 73 

3,500 61 

6,480 56 
27,081 05 



571 72 



$3,092 47 

834 00 
2,832 04 

423 50 



975 00 



1,999 95 
1,743 80 



2,182 10 

_4 
_4 

9,442 22 
2,379 00 

-4 

3,312 39 
5,572 82 

1,025 00 
2,532 67 



92,788 23 


-4 


1,210 00 


- 


18,967 14 


6,204 56 


2,676 10 


2,300 00 



12,990 37 
1,430 76 

300 00 

2,774 10 



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- 


— 




_ 




_ 


_ 


10 




796 




140 


_3 


1 




798 




288 


4 


3 




45 




35 


- 


- 




- 




- 


- 


18 




431 




1 


- 


- 




_3 




_3 


_3 


8 




39 




39 


- 


2 




237 




16 


220 


- 




42 
80 




80 


_3 


- 




12 

27 




27 


16 


- 




59 




59 


_ 


56 




2,006 




276 


_ 


20 




43 




43 


-3 


8 




-3 




-3 


_ 


1 


{ 


52 

71 


} 


71 


52 


4 




11 




11 


_ 


10 




1,286 




10 


- 


- 




- 




- 


-3 



» Not stated. 



* Not separately reported. 



68 



P.D. 17, Part II. 
Abstracts of Reports of Private 





• 


Total 


Incum- 


Subscrip- 


Earnings 






Property 
reported 


brances on 


tions, Dona- 


and 






Real Estate 


tions, etc. 


Refunds 




Blandford. 










1 


Ladies' Benevolent Society of Blandford . 


- 


- 


- 


- 




Boston. 










2 


Abraham Lincoln Post \'eterans of the World War 


120.000 00 


$9,000 00 


11,864 17 


$710 61 


3 


A. C. Ratshesky Charity Foundation 


414,165 50 




250 00 




4 


Adams Nervine Asylum 


948,350 57 


- 


50 00 


29,251 23 


5 


Agoos Family Charity Fund> .... 


- 


_ 






6 


All Souls' Lend a Hand Club. Inc. . 


7,121 79 


- 


3,394 30 


596 96 


7 


American Humane Kduaition Society 


139,673 24 


- 


1,916 40 


5.556 85 


8 


American Invalid Aid Society of Boston . 


100 00 


- 


2,928 65 


_ 


9 


American Unitarian Association 


5,069,906 89 


_ 


127,141 38 


5,119 45 


10 


Animal Rescue League of Boston 


405.818 86 


- 


6,347 51 


22.919 37 


11 


Army and Navy Service Committee, Inc. 


_ 


- 


18,008 30 


20,349 00 


12 


Army Nurse Association of Massachusetts i 


- 


- 






13 


Association for Independent Co-operative Living. 












The 


45,000 00 


45,000 00 


130 75 


15,274 22 


14 


Association for the Work of Mercy in the Diocese 












of Massac hu.sett;? 


36,545 28 


- 


8,414 86 


7,199 39 


15 


Association of the Evangelical Lutheran Church 












for Works of Mercy 


47,210 00 


- 


6,952 93 


5,898 54 


16 


Association of the Hawthorne Club . 


2,163 25 


_ 


1,923 75 


112 25 


17 


Auxiliary Relief Branch of the Russian and Polish 












Jewish Central Committee at Jerusalem 


- 


- 


8,068 37 


- 


18 


Baby Hygiene Association 


41.417 70 


- 


62,270 97 


4,733 20 


19 


Barnard Memorial 


188,634 00 


_ 


_ 


_ 


20 


Beacon Hill Community Centre, Inc.i 




_ 


_ 


_ 


21 


Beneficent Society of the New England Con- 












servatory of Music 


13,050 00 


- 


779 95 


300 00 


22 


Benoth Israel Sheltering Home .... 


60,000 00 


28,500 00 


2,691 15 




23 


Berkeley Infirmary, Inc., The .... 


7,300 00 


2,228 03 


1,105 00 


2,075 06 


24 


Berkshire Music Colony, Inc 


- 


- 


100 00 




25 


Bethany Rescue Mission 


550 00 


- 


804 47 


_ 


26 


Bethany Union for Young Women . 


42,518 75 


_ 


1,070 25 


13,935 10 


27 


Beth David and Linath Hazedek Association' . 


- 


_ 






28 


Bethesda Society 


142,990 63 


_ 


3,582 70 


2,784 01 


29 


Beth Israel Hospital Association' 


- 


_ 






30 


Beyrouth Brotherhood Society' 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


31 


Board of Ministerial Aid' 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


32 


Boston Baptist Bethel City Mission Society' . 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


33 


Boston Baptist Social Union .... 


449,328 45 


_ 


_ 


_ 


34 


Boston Branch Baron de Hirsch Fund 


5,332 06 


- 


- 


- 


35 


Boston Branch of the Christian and Missionary 












Alliance, Inc 


40,000 00 


10,000 00 


19.654 17 


1,108 10 


36 


Boston Children's Aid Society .... 


552,875 34 


- 


51.694 81 


31,074 01 


37 


Boston Children's Friend Society 


305,763 07 


- 


15,662 53 


27,047 97 


38 


Boston City Hospital 


4,369,483 00 


_ 


1,293,476 17 


166,059 82 


39 


Boston Dispensary 


653,616 04 


- 


68,777 46 


85,648 46 


40 


Boston Educational Association for Deaf Chil- 












dren 


2,910 00 


- 


34 00 


_ 


41 


Boston Episcopal Charitable Society . 


138,795 50 


- 


100 00 


- 


42 


Boston Fatherless & Widows' Society 


194,459 20 


- 


450 00 


_ 


43 


Boston Floating Hospital 


387,598 48 


- 


62,801 93 


- 


44 


Boston Health League, Incorporated 


- 


- 


_ 


10 90 


45 


Boston Hebrew Ladies' Aid Association' . 


- 


_ 


_ 




46 


Boston Home for Incurables .... 


946,881 41 


- 


1.715 00 


4,424 00 


47 


Boston Hungarian Rifke Benais Jerusalem, Inc. 


- 


- 


417 73 




48 


Boston Industrial Home 


88.157 97 


20,000 00 


8.215 65 


6.572 11 


49 


Boston Ladies' Bethel Society .... 


_ 


_ 


240 70 


_ 


50 


Boston Leather Trade Benevolent Society 


69,383 50 


- 


1,760 00 


- 


51 


Boston Legal Aid Society 


59,601 28 


49,000 00 


16.980 89 


4,840 26 


52 


Boston Lving-In Hospital 


2.165,193 62 


- 


22,133 27 


38,185 90 


53 


Boston Marine Society 


305,600 00 


- 


- 


_ 


54 


Boston Music School Settlement 


8,450 00 


4,937 50 


8,126 44 


5,601 42 


55 


Boston North End Mission .... 


55,904 01 


- 


2,504 83 


8,836 17 


56 


Boston Nurserv for Blind Babies 


330,600 00 


_ 


5,049 00 


1,229 42 


57 


Boston Pilots' Relief Society .... 


251.075 32 


- 


8,020 00 




58 


Boston Port and Seamen's Aid Society. Managers 












of 


485.921 61 


- 


2,700 00 


10,921 84 


59 


Boston Provident Association .... 


453.672 00 


_ 


19,255 71 


4,034 33 


60 


Boston Public School Teachers' Retirement Fund 


755,836 62 


_ 


_ 


68,778 00 


61 


Boston Relief Committee Incorporated 


- 


- 


11,000 89 


7,393 78 



» No report. 



» Organizations aided. 



P.D. 17, Part II. 
Charitable Corporations 



Continued. 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 


Legacies 
specifically 
restricted 
to Capital 


Unrestricted 
Legacies 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 

Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 

Number 

aided 


Total 

Number 

Free 


Number 

of 

Families 

aided 




- 


- 


- 


$251 89 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


$1,756 01 

8,256 90 

39,648 33 


- 


$300 00 


13,445 81 

6.639 37 

83,327 98 


$900 00 

-4 


1 
45 


322 

189 


41 


- 


2 
3 
4 


289 14 
7,097 87 

232.070 29 

17,014 06 

65 95 


$13,990 51 
9,025 15 


2,327 61 

180,670 06 
52,207 07 


2,522 70 

18,082 40 

3.023 78 

383.785 41 

64,820 32 

40,712 70 


10,342 64 

962 00 

33.260 44 

39,345 36 

2,513 18 


10 

1 

37 

34 

6 


48 

221 
292 
56,500 
86,160 


48 

-3 

221 
_s 

_3 


25 

_3 


5 

6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 


44 59 


- 


- 


12,873 87 


3,392 52 


5 


/ 22 
\ 137 


1 65 


4 


13 


919 51 


- 


- 


16,190 11 


4,988 55 


7 


233 


201 


44 


14 


409 11 
237 68 


_ 


- 


12.391 40 
3.073 41 


4,880 07 
488 98 


9 

8 


22 
250 


20 
153 


-^ 


15 
16 


- 


- 


- 


8,239 80 


3,447 56 


2 


- 


- 


- 


17 


3,451 41 


- 


- 


71,658 73 


64.483 16 


81 


/ 22 

1 14,693 
35,0005 


} 14.693 

-3 


- 


18 


5,772 25 


5,000 00 


- 


3,651 61 


1,243 00 


1 


- 


19 
20 


675 32 
56 06 
350 00 

1,619 50 
1,615 08 


50 00 


~ 


1,072 05 
548 19 

2,925 54 
100 00 

2,593 59 
16.404 42 


-4 

100 00 

421 00 

4,972 83 


4 

3 

7 


7 

1,619 

8,425 
61 


8,425 
61 


-3 

3 


21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
07 


9,034 08 


10,104 43 




16,220 88 


7,149 17 


8 


67 


14 


- 


28 
29 
30 


11,034 30 
227 44 


- 


- 


11,326 62 
153 99 


6,754 82 


30 


- 
_ 

2,145 


- 


159 


31 
32 
33 
34 


1,057 67 


- 


- 


37,369 71 


4,998 50 


3 


f 22 

I 48 

452 


1 .;■ 


25 


35 


34,067 19 


3,063 36 


32,980 00 


134,469 54 


47,629 49 


32 


- 


36 


11,494 80 


25,000 00 


- 


44,566 84 


14,914 50 


11 


/ 52 

I 306 

99,692 

32,210 


} 160 
87,778 


460 


37 


34,812 42 
18,592 83 


6,323 89 


- 


1,280,067 57 
201,934 36 


_4 
-4 


837 
121 


- 


38 
39 


215 86 

7.522 79 

14.281 31 

13,249 84 

35 08 

37,759 21 


710 00 

1,031 49 

42,727 41 

10,841 91 


36,514 42 


582 00 

7,295 00 

18,259 33 

118,760 71 

10,216 33 

37,812 55 
549 39 


582 00 
75 00 

-4 

8,052 00 
17,956 23 


8 

1 

95 
3 

25 


60 

60 

144 

1,964 

42 

12 


60 

60 

144 

1,964 

34 


- 


40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 


1,625 74 


- 


- 


16,796 32 


3,820 57 


11 


f 32 
1 2,979 


} 531 


- 


48 


41 80 


- 


- 


70 72 
2.668 21 


150 00 


- 


12 

10 


10 


- 


49 
50 


3.972 85 


- 


- 


28,908 57 


20,295 00 


17 


/ 62 

\ 6,732 


} 3,926 


- 


51 


16,997 59 

18,318 16 

32 64 

1.870 42 

8.048 19 

13.513 54 


10,000 00 
30,962 58 


5,000 00 
1,000 00 


89,004 12 
22.233 87 
14.614 87 
20.779 91 
14,264 24 
18,430 24 


_4 

2.500 00 
11.144 84 
8.018 44 
6,270 23 
300 00 


33 

33 
16 
10 


4,730 
88 
615 
71 
39 
16 


120 

15 
34 
17 
16 


26 


52 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 


22.380 68 

28.985 85 

32,614 87 

5 81 


- 


6,428 59 
180 66 


30.081 95 
61.622 92 
41.919 31 
18,817 71 


10,935 03 

16.880 02 

768 00 


14 

9 


8,389 
572 

_3 


2,637 


3 
956 

-3 


58 
59 
60 
61 



» Not stated. 



♦ Not separately reported. 



* Attendance. 



70 



P.D. 17, Part II. 
Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 


Incum- 


Subscrip- 


Earnings 






Property 
reported 


brances on 


tions, Dona- 


and 






Real Estate 


tions, etc. 


Refunds 




Boston — Con. 










1 


Boston School of Occupational Therapv, Inc. . 


$18,500 00 


$13,500 00 


$5,193 55 


$9,885 55 


2 


Boston St. Raphael Italian Immigrant Society' 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


3 


Boston Seamen's Friend Society 


199,134 74 


- 


19.422 78 


3,392 63 


4 


Boston Seamen's Friend Society (Incorporated) i 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


5 


Boston Section Council of Jewish Women 


- 


_ 


5,340 56 


_ 


6 


Boston Society for the Care of Girls . 


505,571 41 


- 


22,043 23 


6,982 82 


7 


Boston Society of Decorative Art 


6,476 63 


_ 


_ 


324 54 


8 


Boston Tuberculosis Association 


30,781 27 


- 


10,381 17 


27,133 46 


9 


Boston United Moath Chitim Association i 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


10 


Boston University Nanking Association . 


_ 


_ 


1,092 92 


- 


11 


Boston Weslevan Association .... 


485,119 00 


- 


- 


79,647 29 


12 


Boston Young Men's Christian As.sociation 


1,745,977 25 


200,000 00 


95,426 39 


802,292 62 


13 


Boston Young Men's Christian Union 


1,575,557 84 


- 


31,626 61 


35,666 74 


14 


Boston Young Women's Christian Association . 


556,218 31 


34.000 00 


10,131 23 


247.606 68 


15 


Boston Zezmer Association, Inc.' 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


16 


Boys' Club of Boston Incorporated . 


351,100 00 


- 


37,719 00 


5,426 05 


17 


Brackett Charitable Trust, Incorp>oi-ated . 


4,018 08 


_ 


- 


- 


18 


Brigham Hospital 


500 00 


- 


- 


- 


19 


British Charitable Society 


21,744 98 


- 


1,362 28 


182 60 


20 


Brooke House 


153,129 75 


_ 


488 00 


22,986 28 


21 


Burnap Free Home for Aged Women 


150,000 00 


- 


3,621 46 


- 


22 


Burrage Hospital Association .... 


200,000 00 


- 


3,250 00 


- 


23 


Cape Cod Association 


24,000 00 


_ 


- 


- 


24 


Carney Hospital 


265,200 00 


53,500 00 


6,099 83 


139,859 72 


25 


Carney Hospital Nurses' Alumnae, Inc. . 




_ 


22 00 


- 


26 


Carolina Industrial School 


9,600 00 


- 


12,195 53 


- 


27 


Channing Home ....... 


179,751 04 


- 


1,129 00 


3,173 11 


28 


Charitable Burial Association i .... 


- 


- 


- 


- 


29 


Charitable Irish Society 


5,000 00 


- 


6,551 50 


- 


30 


Charitable Surgical Appliance Shop . 


28,487 96 


_ 


_ 


40,242 87 


31 


Charity of Edward Hopkins, Trustees of . 


73,904 37 


_ 


- 


- 


32 


Charlestown Poor's Fund, Trustees of 


44,933 77 


- 


- 


- 


33 


Children's Heart Hospital 


- 


- 


8,064 32 


- 


34 


Children's Hospital, The 


2,343,213 71 


125,000 00 


169,352 18 


172,543 49 


35 


Children's Mission to Children, The . 


657,172 95 


- 


16,381 55 


14,809 02 


36 


Chinese Mission of New England 


_ 


_ 


5,527 39 


- 


37 


Church Home Association, The 


400 00 


_ 


_ 


308 00 


38 


Church Home Society for the Care of Children 












of the Protestant Episcopal Church 


252,143 35 


- 


16,322 82 


14,866 60 


39 


City Missionary Society 


202,449 37 


- 


28,120 49 


3,257 81 


40 


Columbus Day Nursery of South Boston . 


5,700 00 


- 


2,305 17 


- 


41 


Community Service of Boston, Inc. . 


- 


- 


30,275 53 


- 


42 


Conference of Baptist Ministers in Massachusetts 


262,862 45 


- 


1,861 60 


- 


43 


Consumers' League of Massachusetts 


- 


- 


3,580 00 


- 


44 


Consumptives' Home, Ti-ustees of the 


272,351 53 


- 


- 


- 


45 


Cooperative Workrooms, Inc 


1,749 20 


- 


14,994 52 


21,379 03 


46 


Daly Industrial School 


85,300 00 


- 


1,871 80 


10,761 50 


47 


Deaconess' Aid Society of New England . 


- 


- 


1,338 91 


154 44 


48 


Denison House 


34,217 50 


9,300 00 


10,105 55 


2,645 81 


49 


Devens Benevolent Society .... 


- 


- 


- 


- 


50 


Dewing Memorial i 


- 


- 


- 


- 


51 


Diocesan Board of Missions ' . . . . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


52 


Dispensary for Women 


- 


- 


375 00 


1,158 45 


53 


Donations to the Protestant Episcopal Church, 












Trustees of" 


- 


- 


- 


- 


54 


Dorchester House 


- 


- 


2.926 75 


- 


55 


Dorche.ster Relief Society . . . . 


- 


- 


25 00 


- 


56 


Durant Incorporated, The . . . . 
East Boston Free Loan Association, Inc. . 


244,921 63 


- 


171,182 70 


8,925 65 


57 




- 


115 11 


5,433 40 


58 


Eastern Missionary Association' 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


59 


Elizabeth Peabody House Association 


155,678 80 


73,875 80 


25,413 72 


8,031 63 


60 


Ellen M. Gifford Sheltering Home Corporation . 


187,307 07 


- 


- 


- 


61 


Ellis Memorial and Eldredge House, Inc. . 


28,740 66 


4,200 00 


20,617 50 


1,945 30 


62 


Employees' Fund, Incorporated 


68,791 05 


- 


- 


- 


63 


Eolian Protective Society, Inc 


- 


- 


- 


- 


64 


Episcopal City Mission, The' . . . . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


65 


Euxinus Pontus Association' . . . . 


— 


— 


— 


— 


66 


Evangelical Alliance of Greater Boston 1 . 


- 


- 


- 


~ 



No report. 



2 Organizations aided. 



P.D. 17, Part II. 
Charitable Corporations 



Continued. 



71 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 


Legacies 
specifically 
restricted 
to Capital 


Unrestricted 
Legacies 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 

Number 

aided 


Total 

Number 

Free 


Number 

of 

Families 

aided 




$224 96 


- 


- 


$16,044 19 


$10,777 31 


15 


/ 252 
1 187 


121 


_ 


1 


11,310 87 


- 


$21,411 71 


30,868 77 


15,172 19 


15 


_3 


-• 


_3 


2 
3 
4 
5 


53 84 


_ 


_ 


4,331 70 


_ 


7 


1,205 


1,205 


_ 


26,810 40 


- 


3,549 43 


63,617 46 


24,974 45 


18 


668 


9 


- 


6 


276 61 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


7 


1,705 65 


- 


- 


25,557 91 


11,020 39 


8 


46 


40 


- 


8 
9 
10 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1,942 20 


1,903 50 


1 


r- 


_ 


_ 


37,606 42 


- 


- 


38,561 31 


10,521 43 


10 


_3 


- 


- 


11 


13,708 82 


$15,000 00 


- 


917,480 28 


144,837 42 


342 


/ 82 

\ 13,220 


, 


- 


12 


39,476 00 


21,400 00 


26,169 09 


112,137 38 


44,476 98 


45 


/ 782 
1 8,031 


2,396 


- 


13 


19,752 24 


- 


15.000 00 


311,529 86 


109,896 72 


110 


24,8065 


- 


_3 


14 
15 
16 


117 43 


1,100 00 


_ 


50,286 17 


24,066 37 


37 


6,477 


_ 


_ 


121 55 


- 


- 


241 86 


- 


_ 


- 


_ 


- 


17 


133 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


18 


849 22 


- 


- 


1,913 91 


500 00 


1 


\ 119 
576 


1 119 
86 


30 


19 


3,841 15 


25,125 00 


_ 


21,914 82 


8,885 18 


13 


3 


20 


6,157 80 


- 


8,060 07 


8,752 69 


4,049 49 


4 


18 


18 


-■ 


21 


- 


- 


- 


3,253 22 


1,200 00 


1 


- 


- 


- 


22 


1,193 96 


- 


- 


470 00 


- 


- 


2 


2 


- 


23 


884 19 


- 


14,085 80 


141,560 54 


_4 


94 


25,887 


487 


- 


24 


7 58 


- 


- 


465 99 


- 


_ 


1 


_ 


- 


25 


209 42 


- 


- 


12,319 57 


5,170 24 


10 


67 


- 


- 


26 


7,749 64 


- 


3,700 00 


15,237 06 


5,880 00 


9 


72 


24 


2 


27 
28 


548 29 


- 


- 


5.077 81 


1,232 85 


1 


f 12 

I 10 


} 10 


- 


29 


1,336 51 


_ 


_ 


35,994 35 


20,807 25 


16 


- 


30 


4,209 23 


- 


- 


3,434 69 


200 00 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


31 


1.711 70 


- 


- 


1,851 25 


350 00 


- 


175 


175 


- 


32 


- 


- 


- 


7,592 91 


-3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


33 


46,125 28 


235,836 23 


- 


318,750 94 


_4 


190 


14,353 


366 


- 


34 


32,143 27 


- 


20,124 48 


64,098 94 


22,060 41 


13 


207 


89 


- 


35 


65 00 


- 


_ 


5,521 30 


2,601 17 


3 


600 


600 


100 


36 


38 49 


- 


- 


- 


- 






- 


- 


37 


13,379 15 


8,073 80 


_ 


64,120 47 


19.969 61 


14 


22 


-3 


_3 


38 


10,289 82 


- 


10,025 00 


41,556 87 


23,489 39 


20 


4,420 


180 


_3 


39 


- 


- 


1,220 00 


3,381 83 


937 00 


5 


198 


- 


- 


40 


99 73 


- 


- 


27,849 86 


8.481 93 


5 


- 


- 


- 


41 


13,828 01 


- 


- 


14,731 00 


370 00 


2 


50 


50 


- 


42 


62 36 


- 


- 


3,745 07 


2.531 00 


1 


_3 


_,> 


_3 


43 


1,091 88 


6,521 82 


- 


7,787 42 


2.500 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


44 


144 19 


- 


- 


36.179 49 


7,965 24 


7 


/ 22 

1 334 
130 


} 334 
13 


- 


45 


2,925 19 


- 


- 


18,132 91 


3,228 00 


10 


- 


46 


170 10 


- 


- 


3.979 15 


- 




1 12 


} - 


- 


47 


1,245 54 


- 


- 


18,293 56 


11,220 43 


11 


606 


_3 


493 


48 


240 63 


- 




354 67 


~ 


: 


22 


~ 


10 


49 
50 


- 


- 


- 


1,615 90 


629 00 


1 


3,995 


- 


- 


51 

52 


110 53 


- 


2,100 00 


- 
3,303 85 


1,817 32 


6 


_3 


~ 


_3 


53 
54 


160 00 


_ 


_ 


477 25 


300 00 


- 


- 


- 


13 


55 


9,380 45 


- 


- 


35.911 74 


10,289 71 


4 


_3 


- 


_3 


56 


- 


- 


- 


5.575 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


57 

58 


3,587 40 


140 64 


- 


37.449 83 


18,694 02 


4 


1,920^ 


760 


_3 


59 


5,905 51 


- 


1,000 00 


6.231 94 


1,579 30 


2 


( 697 
1,500 


} 697 


- 


60 


77 83 


_ 


_ 


26,295 25 


11,996 83 


11 


_ 


- 


61 


1,916 97 


- 


- 


773 92 


- 


- 


2 


2 


1 


62 


_ 


~ 


- 


186 85 


_ 


~ 


_ 


~ 


_ 


63 
64 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


65 
66 



3 Not stated. 



Not separately rep)orted. 



' Attendance. 



72 



P.D. 17, Part II. 
Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 


Incum- 


Subscrip- 


Earnings 






I*roperty 
reported 


brances on 


tions, Dona- 


and 






Real Estate tions, etc. 


Refunds 




Boston — Con. 










1 


Evangelistic Association of New England . 


$4,119 87 


- 


$15,474 20 


- 


2 


Faith and Hope Association .... 


3.500 00 


- 


4.400 13 


$1,250 30 


3 


Family Welfare Society of Boston 


407,852 70 


_ 


78.636 84 


_ 


4 


Farm and Trades School, The .... 


564.559 11 


- 


7.554 37 


9.966 56 


5 


Fathers' and Mothers' Club .... 


4.916 50 


$2,000 00 


2.690 93 


422 95 


6 


Faulkner Hospital Corporation .... 


632.612 34 




40 00 


92,484 20 


7 


Federated Jewish Charities of Boston 


95,135 34 


36,680 00 


380.578 94 


_ 


8 


First Spiritualist Ladies' Aid Society 






309 45 


552 40 


9 


Florence Crittenton League of Compassion, In- 
corporated 


1 194.659 77 


- 


13.985 98 


13,037 44 


10 


Folk Handicrafts Guild 


6.611 50 


_ 


_ 


28,713 95 


11 


Fors>'th Dental Infirmary for Children 


3,133.058 48 


_ 


84,458 27 


11,005 71 


12 


Fragment Society, The 


28,260 00 


- 


265 00 


- 


13 


Frances E. Willard Settlement .... 


184,724 94 


15.000 00 


15.971 30 


38,842 53 


14 


Frances Merry Barnard Home, Inc. . 


48.596 76 


- 


- 


- 


15 


Franklin Square Hou.se, The .... 


652.597 13 


85,000 00 


5.356 15 


322,518 48 


16 


Franklin Typographical Society 


61.909 26 




230 00 


4,144 00 


17 


Frauen Verein 


10.000 00 


-3 


2.993 77 


4,887 82 


18 


Frederick E. Weber Charities Corporation. The 


474.589 45 


- 


- 


3,152 73 


19 


Free Home for Consumptives in the City of 












Boston 


_ 


_ 


2.074 34 


- 


20 


French Benevolent and Relief A.ssociation ' 


- 


_ 




- 


21 


French Women's Christian .\ssociation 


7.250 00 


2.500 00 


588 00 


3,155 39 


22 


German Aid Society of Boston .... 


41.505 21 




677 00 




23 


German Ladies' Aid Society of Boston 


_3 


_3 


614 30 


- 


24 


German Ladies' Aid Society of Boston (Alten- 












heim Fund) 


87,849 37 


- 


3.256 17 


4,650 00 


25 


Girls' Friendly Society Home ... 


15.200 00 


_ 


3.127 42 


4,215 27 


26 


Girls' Friendly Society in the Diocese of Massa- 
chusetts, Inc 


1 21,799 35 


- 


4.621 75 


777 92 


27 


Good Will House Association .... 


- 


- 


11,908 83 


- 


28 


Good Will Industries of America, Inc. i 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


29 


Grand Masters and Wardens of the Alpha Grand 
Lodge. Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of 












Massachusetts' 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


30 


Greater Boston Association of Guardians of the 












Camp Fire Girls 


25.000 00 


20,000 00 


6,519 78 


18,676 46 


31 


Greek Ladies' Benevolent Society of Boston i . 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


32 


Guild of St. Appollonia, Inc 


1,500 00 


- 


5,472 57 


1,382 35 


33 


Guild of St. Elizabeth, The .... 


8.000 00 


7,000 00 


1.501 10 


3,005 12 


34 


Hahnemann Hospital 


48.600 42 






- 


35 


Hale House Association 


112.405 06 


_ 


22.420 97 


- 


36 


Harriet Tubman House, Inc 


13.000 005 


3,000 00 


1.546 87 


3,778 00 


37 


Hebrew Chesed Shel Emas of the South End of 












Boston' 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


38 


Hebrew Free Loan Society, The 


_3 


_3 


10,564 60 


172,719 28 


39 


Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, The 


_ 


_ 


8,878 70 


52 00 


40 


Hebrew Industrial School ' .... 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


41 


Hebrew Ladies' Free Loan Association of Roxbury 


_ 


_ 


1,454 38 


11,586 90 


42 


Hebrew Ladies' Moshev Zekainim Association . 


92,000 00 


_ 


49,481 36 


6,714 00 


43 


Hebrew Women's Sewing Society 


10,050 00 


_ 


150 15 


- 


44 


Hecht Neighborhood House, Incorporated' 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


45 


Helping Hand Society "Dania" 


- 


_ 


169 63 


- 


46 


Holy Child Day Nursery, The' 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


47 


Holy Trinity Catholic School and Society 


- 


- 


770 50 


4.160 00 


48 


Home for Aged Colored Women 


237,153 38 


- 


1,049 30 


370 29 


49 


Home for Aged Couples 


1,500,991 29 


- 


630 00 


8,155 00 


50 


Home for Aged Men 


784,490 30 


- 


- 


- 


51 


Home for Aged Women 


1.318,414 94 


_ 


1,665 68 


1,925 79 


52 


Home for Destitute Catholic Children in Boston 


527,647 92 


_ 


32,594 55 


- 


53 


Home for Italian Children, Incorporated' 




_ 




- 


54 


Home for Jewish Children 


10,885 00 


_ 


69.185 22 


686 33 


55 


House of the Angel Guardian .... 


527.302 43 


_ 


29,513 19 


72,698 29 


56 


Hou.se of the Good Samaratin .... 


513,785 00 


_ 


21.451 56 


8.014 19 


57 


House of the Good Shepherd .... 


501,900 00 


- 


4.457 56 


75.443 17 


58 


Household Nursing Association, The 




_ 


10,069 06 


9,484 89 


59 


Howard Benevolent Society .... 


570,324 82 


_ 


50 00 


- 


60 


Humane Society of the Commonwealth of Mas- 
sachusetts 


} 314,514 31 


- 


- 


- 


61 


Hunt .\sylum for Destitute Children . 


46.654 88 


_ 


14 00 


- 


62 


Huntington Institute for Orphan Children 


218.429 72 


- 




~ 



No report. 



Organizations aided. 



P.D. 17, Part II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



73 



Legacies 
specifically Unrestricted 
restricted Legacies 
to Capital 



Current 
Expenditures 



Salaries 

and 

Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


$3,165 00 

609 02 

84,971 33 

19,269 63 

1,430 00 

-4 

22,582 51 
208 58 


10 
2 

67 

22 
2 

38 
9 
3 


19,321 35 


16 


19,869 61 

-4 


20 
84 


34,817 74 


36 


142,606 50 

75 00 

2,141 02 


150 
3 


3,950 00 


1 


- 


2 


1,085 06 
660 00 
123 40 


2 

_3 


2,265 00 
2.837 90 


4 
9 


600 00 


- 


4,614 80 


~ 


3,080 96 


1 


2.780 00 
2,475 85 


2 
5 


12,955 51 
688 00 


14 
2 


8,009 07 
6,430 00 


5 
2 


100 00 

15.741 15 

563 75 


1 
14 


816 75 


4 


3.510 94 


7 


12,557 18 


21 


20,302 48 


20 


19.613 50 
9.477 00 


28 
13 


22.554 13 
4,332 00 

11.603 00 

10.379 17 

1.358 50 


20 
4 

17 
9 

5 


5.862 59 


15 


25 00 


- 


~ 


" 



Total 

Number 

aided 



Total 

Number 

Free 



Number 

of 

Families 

aided 



$27,850 80 
14,000 00 



2.000 00 
300 00 



5,000 00 



633 38 



19,600 00 



21,700 00 



5,604 65 



$34,325 94 
1,938 00 



4,694 65 



3,917 65 



6,324 67 



2,510 00 



7,512 76 

3,618 14 

54,681 30 
67,939 69 

3,768 66 
20,051 95 



$21,292 90 
5.168 25 

104.460 52 

56,453 90 

3,749 51 

108,214 03 

397,566 20 
1,037 52 

37.200 47 

25.840 81 

124.019 20 

1.890 99 

64.867 11 

20 00 

325.603 77 

8.461 09 

9,066 32 

20.754 81 



3,386 48 

3,375 81 

2,790 74 

979 45 

8,458 11 
8,629 36 

5.509 98 
7,202 49 



14.819 24 

5.061 97 

4,462 87 

170 54 

26.548 39 

3.946 05 



180.738 96 
8.678 90 

12,342 53 

47.333 20 

571 25 

171 46 

4,919 28 

13.062 64 
44,947 41 
60,858 06 

64.063 74 
37.929 64 

68.081 43 
72,426 36 
77,776 89 
95.449 80 
20.039 55 
25.602 60 



14. 



67 



1.172 00 
11,273 50 



414 

118 

60 

1.413 

152 

P 

242 

873 

268 

61,533 

375 

2,386 

825 

63 

210 



130 



158 



27 

392 

32 

6.724 

32 

1.115 



944 



11.700 
237 



1.000 



4,000 



156 



31 

P 
69 

85 

12 

130 

197 

3,079 



708 
262 
783 

22 
f 22 

\ 5.000 





-3 


38 
414 
24 
23 
52 


3,323 


- 


3 


664 


_3 


21 

375 

12 


175 


210 


10 


83 


15 


130 


- 


_ 


_3 


158 


274 
14 


19 


- 


-J 


- 


1.115 


125 


27 


- 


11,700 
60 


130 


400 
2 


15 


_3 


_3 


- 


_J 


246 
156 


246 


3 


5 


5 


_3 


66 


- 


130 


- 


3.079 


- 


180 
268 


- 


783 


_J 


- 


574 


5.000 


- 


26 


10 


~ 


~ 



* Not stated. 



Not separately reported. 



4 See 1922 report. 



P.D. 17, Part II. 
Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Total 
P*roperty 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 



Subscripv- 
tions. Dona- 
tions, etc. 



22 ' 

23 I 

24 ' 
25 
26 

27 i 



Boston' — Con. 
Immigjant's Home, East Boston. The 
Industrial Aid Society .... 

Industrial School for Crippled and Deformed 

Children 

Industrial School for Girls .... 

Infants' Hospital 

Institution of the Little Si.sters of the Poor 
Instructive District Nursing .\ssociation . 

Irwin Fund. Trustees of the 

Isaac Alberts Memorial Aid Association 
Jacoby Club of Boston .... 
Jamaica Plain Community Conference 
Jamaica Plain Disp>ensary .... 
Jamaica Plain Friendly Society' 
Jamaica Plain Neighborhood House Association 
James Marsh Jackson League, Inc. * . 
Jewish Anti-Tuberculosis Association ' 

Jewish Children's Aid Society of Boston . 

Jewish Children's Bureau of Boston. Inc. . 

Jewish Legion of Massachusetts, Inc. 

Jewish Maternity Clinic Association . 

John Boylston's Charitable Donations for the 
Benefit and Support of Aged Poor Persons, and 
of Orphans and Deserted Children, Trustees of 

John Howard Industrial Home » . . . 

Judge Baker Foundation 

Junior League of Boston, Inc.. The . 

Keith Fund. Inc. 

Kfar Debian Society, Inc 

Ladies Auxiliary of the Jewish Peoples Institute, 

Inc., The' 

Ladies Auxiliary to Company L, Sixth Regiment, 

Massachusetts National Guard, Inc. 
Ladies Benevolent Circle of the Clarendon Street 

Baptist Church ...... 

Ladies' Helping Hand Auxiliary to the Home 

for Destitute Jewish Children' . . 
Ladies' Kennel .\ssociation of Massachusetts . 

Ladies' Lyceum L'nion 

Ladies' Unity Club . . ... 
LawTcnce Avenue Free Loan Association . 
Iveague of Women for Community Service 

Lend a Hand Society 

Leopold Morse Home for Infirm Hebrews and 
Orphanage 

Lincoln House Association 

Little House, Inc., The ..... 

Lord's Day League of New England 

Lucy Stone Home, The 

Lucy \Yheelock Kindergarten Alumnae Associa- 
tion Incorporated, The' ..... 

Lutheran Immigrant Board, The 

Marie Dewing Faelten Charitable -Association, 
Inc. ' ........ 

Masonic Education and Charity Trust 

Massachusetts Association for Occupational 
i Therapy, Inc 

Massachusetts Association for Promoting the 
I Interestsof the Adult Blind . . . . 
1 Massachusetts Baptist Charitable Society . 

Massachusetts Baptist Convention 

Massachusetts Branch of the Shut-in Society, Inc. 

Massachusetts Charitable Eye and Ear Infirmary 

; Massachusetts Charitable Fire Society 

Massachusetts Charitable Fire Society (Summer 
Street Fire Fund) 

Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Association' 

Massachusetts Charitable Society 

Massachusetts Child Labor Committee (In- 
corp>orated) 



$43,000 00 
64,663 76 



1,039,764 83 
160.312 15 
410.365 60 
104.100 00 
353.664 66 



22.911 30 

13.464 87 
25.531 25 

500 00 

3.500 00 

204,900 00 
12.726 50 
110,045 00 



12,043 38 



_ 


8,000 00 


11,500 00 


68.146 11 


96,690 84 


158,457 16 


6,719 74 

111,164 60 

10,600 00 


23,800 00 


1,208,146 05 


97,482 37 


263.390 52 

932,575 39 

3,282 84 

1,250.679 26 


59.003 44 


44,639 95 


179,831 13 


~ 



$2,000 00 



2,750 00 



3,500 00 



$3,091 00 
3,513 00 


5,673 54 

258 00 

52,566 87 

8,575 95 

132,921 53 


8,000 00 


333 00 
2,340 00 


3,988 43 
10,029 00 


5.396 82 


31.579 49 



3.237 63 



27.257 55 

7,438 80 
320 00 
251 50 



103 60 
31 80 



390 00 
451 29 

7,691 55 
152 95 

2,406 35 


6,503 81 


24,022 77 


4,169 40 

11,008 78 

1.487 52 


2.941 89 


3,325 50 


5,986 50 


1,491 40 
47,003 34 

1,823 74 
41,927 46 


11,519 98 



' No report. 



Organizations aided. 



P.D. 17, Part II. 
Charitable Corporations 



Continued. 



75 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 


Legacies 
specifically 
restricted 
to Capital 


Unrestricted 
Legacies 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 

Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 

Number 

aided 


Total 

Number 

Free 


Number 

of 

Families 

aided 




$3,769 58 


- 


- 


$4,498 29 
7,839 00 


$1,907 87 
6.923 71 


4 
5 


2.986 
1.215 


20 
1,215 


-3 


2 


38,614 06 

11,247 15 

9,068 85 

56 62 

17,233 95 


$10,000 00 
5,010 44 

7,078 00 


$38,627 81 
9,409 81 


46,572 84 
11,871 22 
59,979 89 
16,699 00 
248,801 39 


26.433 17 
2.737 85 

-4 

202,783 75 


46 

4 

38 

149 


117 

34 

659 

229 

38,740 


117 

18 

235 

229 

14,686 


25 

_3 


3 

4 
5 
6 

7 


21 97 


- 


- 


8,473 00 


- 


- 


/ 46'-' 

I 11 
17 
53 


) - 


_3 


8 


44 30 


- 


- 


415 55 

3,948 89 


2,255 00 


1 


17 
53 


_3 


9 
10 


1,035 20 


- 


- 


1,070 86 


512 00 


- 


805 


805 


- 


11 
12 
1 


513 60 
2,891 42 


- 


- 


5,705 88 
26,261 16 


3,451 50 
8,147 56 


3 

8 


1,000 
800 


1,000 
627 


-3 


\6 
14 
15 
16 


108 80 


- 


_ 


4,660 00 


- 


- 


/ 72 

1 150 
406 

12 

242 


} 150 


- 


17 


66 79 
9 50 


- 


- 


51,072 82 

433 54 

4,495 43 


10,911 54 
2,441 22 


_3 

2 


279 

_3 

42 


_3 
-3 


18 
19 
20 


7,372 48 


- 


- 


6,691 78 


- 


- 


32 


" 


- 


21 

22 


1,062 00 


- 


- 


27,278 53 


20,943 75 


8 


/ 202 
\ 900 

122 
_3 


} 900 


- 


23 


29 70 
5,616 96 


- 


- 


6,590 71 

4,750 00 

228 33 


- 


2 


- 


_3 


24 
25 
26 


_ 


_ 


- 


113 00 


- 


- 


f 12 

I 7 


} I 


3 


27 
28 


955 14 


- 


- 


993 67 


52 00 


1 


/ 41 
\ 8 


} ■' 


- 


29 


254 01 
117 36 


- 


- 


712 32 

1,249 20 

5,539 99 

31 00 

4,095 80 


216 05 

1.829 00 

25 00 

1,433 03 


9 
3 

3 


8 
10 

1,025 


525 


6 
25 


30 
31 

32 
33 
34 
35 


3,298 51 


- 


- 


9,873 05 


-4 


3 


/ 252 
\ 178 


} 176 


2 


36 


4,640 68 


- 


- 


4,060 00 


50 00 


1 


12 


} 100 


_3 


37 


7,040 22 


- 


- 


33,783 96 


22.664 30 


18 


( 850 


- 


38 


7 45 
6,930 39 


1,334 74 


- 


4,212 17 

11,851 39 

1,433 32 


2.985 61 

6.520 00 

611 10 


2 
4 

1 


4,800 


_3 


- 


39 
40 
41 


- 


- 


- 


9,489 57 


2,850 00 


5 


1,657 


268 


- 


42 
43 


54,880 21 


88,683 97 


~ 


35,026 66 


1,320 00 


2 


23 


_3 


-3 


44 
45 


12 74 


- 


- 


12.836 20 


2,492 50 


2 


94 


} 173 


- 


46 


1,245 47 


- 


- 


9,834 85 


3.971 85 


6 


\ 231 


- 


47 


12,594 01 

44,434 26 

153 02 

31,058 79 

2,488 39 


6.272 36 
75 00 


290 00 
3,700 00 


16,376 77 

87,170 50 

1,610 66 

261,724 24 

2.880 77 


500 00 

10.754 00 

480 00 

-4 

300 00 


8 

1 

197 


70 

872 

400 

6,376 

f 242 

1 14 


316 

} - 


_3 
_3 


48 
49 
50 
51 
52 


1,786 84 


- 


- 


660 00 


50 00 


1 


16 


- 


- 


53 
'54 


8,268 56 


- 


- 


8.165 20 


400 00 


- 


7 
/ 1^ 


_3 

} - 


- 


0-* 
55 


112 70 


- 


- 


11,324 02 


7.108 17 


3 


~ 


56 



3 Not stated. 



* Not separately reported. 



s Report for 20 months. 



76 



P.D. 17, Part II. 
Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Total 
Property 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 



Subscrip- 
tions, Dona- 
tions, etc. 



Earnings 

and 
Refunds 



Boston — Con. 

Massachusetts ConKri»gational Charitable Society 

Massachusetts Division of the International Sun- 
shine Society ....... 

Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston; Mc- 
lean Hospital, Belmont . 

Massachusetts Health Company 

Massachusetts Home .... 

Ma.ssachusetts Home Missionary Society 

Massachusetts Homeopathic Hospital' 

Massachusetts League of Girls' Clubs, Incorpo- 
rated 

Massachusetts Lying-in Hospital 

Massachu.sctts Maternity and Foundling Hospital 
Corporation ...... 

Massachusetts Medical Benevolent Society 

Massachusetts No-License League 

Massachusetts Prison .\ssociation 

.Massachusetts Pythian Sisters Home Association 

Massachusetts Royal Arcanum Hospital Fund 
.\ssociation. Inc. .... 

Massachusetts Society for Aiding Discharged 
Prisoners 

Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Animals .... 

Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Children 

Ma.ssachusetts Society for the University Educa- 
tion of Women ...... 

Massachusetts Teachers' Federation . 

Massachusetts Temperance Society . 

Massachusetts Trustee.s of the International Com 
mittee of the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion for Army and Navy Work, Inc. 

Massachusetts Woman's Christian Temperance 
Union ...... 

Massachusetts W'omen's Hospital 

Massasoit Memorial Association . 

Maverick Dispensary of East Boston, The 

Merrimac Mission, Inc., The 

Michael Anagnos Schools . 

Millenium Guild .... 

Morgan Memorial Cooperative Industries and 
Stores, Inc., The .... 

Mount Pleasant Home, The 

Mount Sinai Hospital Society of Boston, Mass. 

National Pan-Epirotic Union in America i 

Needlewoman's Friend Society, The . 

New England Anti- Vivisection Society 

New England .\ssociation for the Benefit of the 
Orphans and the Disabled Soldiers of the War 
in France 1 ..... 

New England Baptist Hospital . 

New England Branch of the Woman's Foreign 
Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church ...... 

New England Deaconess Association (excluding 
hospitals) 

New England Deaconess Association (Hospital 
in Boston) ..... 

New England Deaconess Association, Palmer 
Memorial Hospital for Incurables . 

New England District of the Christian and Mis 
sionary Alliance, Inc. i . . . . 

New England Grenfell Association 

New England Home for Little Wanderers 

New England Hospital for Women and Children 

New England Kurn Hattin Homes 

New England Moral Reform Society . 

New England Watch and Ward Society 

Newsboys' Reading Room As.sociation 

Nickerson Home for Children . 

Norfolk House Centre 

North Bennet Street Industrial School 

North End Diet Kitchen . 



$262,072 00 



10,977,238 86 



76.050 75 
471,809 45 



5.946 59 



23,067 92 
75,800 00 



22,476 47 
3,000 00 



96,696 39 
854,116 48 
481,561 98 



1,000 00 
17,700 00 



262,140 27 



110,779 57 

10,061 22 

1,745 00 

259,284 86 



554,277 63 

128.515 46 

250 00 

53.593 75 
47,550 00 



138,100 00 

43,808 38 
439,823 44 
574,303 07 

27,845 00 

135,773 67 
1,403,879 89 
1,070,190 71 

186,589 77 

_3 

8,920 59 
29,529 13 
106,298 24 
124,306 43 

40,822 67 



$11,000 00 
400 00 



25,000 00 



128,000 00 



$68,360 34 



9,291 00 
113,701 91 



6,575 83 



258 00 

1,290 00 
674 41 

1,015 57 

140 00 

26,126 95 

107,184 82 

542 93 
6,928 90 

8,762 05 

8,831 94 
147 50 
1.317 56 
5,923 20 
5,000 96 

34 00 

43,851 40 
5,682 40 



183 00 
2,270 59 



2,754 92 

86,241 44 
7,148 87 
8,108 49 

11,187 10 

51,317 50 

32.430 73 

5,340 35 

1.217 34 
15.149 57 

7.906 90 
964 00 

1,065 70 
12.489 19 

38.431 81 

1,960 75 



$1,490,702 51 
2.358 15 
34,374 08 
1,471 02 



No report. 



Organizations aided. 



P.D. 17, Part II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



77 



Interest. 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 


Legacies 
specifically 
restricted 
to Capital 


Unrestricted 
Legacies 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 

Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 

Number 

aided 


Total 

Number 

Free 


Number 

of 

Families 

aided 




$15,792 41 


_ 


_ 


$14,219 07 


$300 00 


_ 


50 


50 


. 


1 


- 


- 


- 


100 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_3 


2 


269,129 38 

767 14 
28,669 50 


$446,679 61 


$124,753 93 


1,915,153 12 

2,341 59 

44,294 33 

156,380 84 


-4 

1,820 00 
20.342 43 
12,937 50 


911 

2 

37 

3 


37.296 

784 
88 

_3 


1,052 
64 
27 


16 

_3 


3 
4 
5 
6 

7 


137 62 


100 00 


- 


10,470 66 


5,473 83 


3 


f 332 
1 4.057 


} ; 


- 


8 
9 


1.177 57 
5,836 74 


- 


- 


52 50 
4,996 07 


- 


_3 


1 
22 

_3 


1 


— 3 


10 
11 


1,370 72 
514 13 


- 


- 


1,787 75 
209 72 


1,085 00 


2 


_3 


-3 




13 
14 


27 62 


- 


- 


1,036 00 


150 00 


- 


39 


39 


- 


15 


5,699 13 


5,000 00 


- 


3,672 45 


1,416 62 


1 


654 


654 


- 


16 


37.608 57 


31,626 01 


108,776 19 


167,708 60 


49,344 36 


50 


425,578 


419,573 


- 


17 


19.058 79 


8,628 38 


57,537 89 


172,541 45 


120,364 26 


78 


12,996 


12,996 


- 


18 


1,472 91 

95 12 

1,095 16 


- 


- 


2,769 57 

10,042 34 

1,606 26 


66 60 
3,772 46 


1 
3 


_3 
82 


_3 


-3 


19 
20 
21 


1.544 76 


- 


- 


69,803 12 


32,951 62 


25 


150,000 


_3 


- 


22 


1,787 52 
4,436 30 

705 80 

50 00 

22,493 66 


1,745 00 


2,000 00 

- 


16,298 51 

30,064 18 

1,560 87 

11,948 81 

5,290 78 

8.624 76 

31 75 


4,431 92 

-4 

8,044 59 
3,500 00 


2 

-3 

14 
3 


_3 

5,912 
6,056 


_3 
_3 

6,056 


_3 
_3 

20 

_3 
_3 


23 
24 
25 
26 

27 
28 
29 


4,991 24 

2,775 08 

10 63 


7,615 00 


2,068 54 
1,250 00 


380,667 62 

25,459 78 

10 63 


93,251 74 
8,964 05 


95 
14 


4.457 
42 


2,284 


407 


30 
31 
32 

•JO 


5,131 62 
2,094 59 


2,000 00 


2,980 00 
8,408 75 


11,677 43 
5,633 99 


2,060 00 
2.040 35 


2 

2 


120 

22 


120 


- 


66 
34 
35 


4,080 78 


- 


" - 


79,769 82 


-4 


44 


1.051 


70 


- 


36 
37 


3,807 79 


- 


18,062 66 


114.265 52 


500 00 


1 


- 


- 


_3 


38 


6,031 83 


475 00 


- 


37.948 57 


18.030 97 


13 


_3 


-=• 


-3 


39 


14,243 67 


1,000 00 


- 


127.828 87 


_4 


66 


1.892 


88 


- 


40 


1,618 59 


22,300 00 


- 


48,614 86 


_4 


33 


105 


- 


- 


41 


2,841 64 


- 


- 


23,340 99 


1.818 00 


2 


P 


~ 


- 


42 
43 


60,137 59 


10,136 74 


41,035 58 


130.568 25 


62,615 48 


60 


/ 282 
1 739 


} 180 


220 


44 


32,339 56 

10,272 22 
8.354 17 
520 99 
1.312 62 
7.724 07 
2.910 07 


17,500 00 

4.500 00 
310 68 

5,000 00 


27.757 63 
5.000 00 

2,000 00 


155,508 89 

6,211 50 

29.453 46 

16.327 43 

2.371 41 

6,675 99 

24,761 33 

49,298 74 


-4 

376 50 
14,024 12 
12,052 74 

950 00 

1.524 29 

11,682 83 

31,865 85 


78 
1 

22 
5 

I 

46 
46 


5,608 

365 

500 

53 

2,500 

2,0C0 

f 7* 
\ 288 


80 
195 

10 
1.740 


- 


45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 


2,024 19 


- 


- 


3.581 17 


820 70 


2 


) - 


- 


53 



» Not stated. 



♦ Not separately reported. 



78 



P.D. 17, Part II. 
Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 


Incum- 


SubscripH 


Earnings 






Property 


brances on 


tions. Dona- 


and 






reported 


Real Estate 


tions, etc. 


Refunds 




Boston — Con. 










1 


North End Dispensary 


- 


- 


$5 00 


- 


2 


Norwegian Mission Home 


$10,500 00 


$10,311 00 


1,937 30 


$2,885 70 


3 


Norwegian Old Peoples Home and Charitable 












Association of Greater Boston 


19,554 55 


- 


1.778 73 


746 50 


4 


Novogradvolinsk Relief Association of Massa- 












chusetts' 


_ 


- 


_ 


_ 


5 


Nutrition Clinics for Delicate Children, Inc. . 


_ 


_ 


7,902 85 


8,651 22 


6 


Oliver Ditson Society for the Relief of Needy 












Musicians 


34,000 00 




- 


_ 


7 


Ostriner Aid Association, Inc. 1 .... 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


8 


Overseers of the Poor of the Town of Boston in the 












Province of Massachusetts Bay in New England 


684,616 32 


_ 


_ 


_ 


9 


Pan-Albanian Federation of America "Vatra" 












(The Hearth) Inc., The 


- 




26,283 95 


9,256 87 


10 


Pan-Cretan Society Minos Inc 


- 


- 


2,456 90 


_ 


11 


Pan-Hellenic Union in America 


_ 


_ 




12,060 17 


12 


Particular Council Society St. Vincent de Paul 












of the City of Boston, The 1 .... 


_ 




_ 


_ 


13 


Permanent Charity Fund, Incorporated, Com- 












mittee of The 


4,386,534 69 


- 


- 


- 


14 


Permanent Peace Fund, Trustees of . 


136.1C4 22 


- 


_ 


_ 


15 


Peter Bent Brigham Hospital .... 


6,459,760 93 


- 


12,955 11 


293,348 63 


16 


Phileducational Association of Georgitsiotes 












"Socrates" i 


- 


- 


- 


- 


17 


Piatker Relief Association, Inc. 1 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


18 


Portuguese Immigrant Aid Society of the United 












States of America, Inc., The .... 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


19 


Preachers' Aid Society of the New England An- 
nual Conference of the Methodist Episcopal 












Church 


445,445 93 


- 


_ 


7 00 


20 


Pultusker Benevolent Association! . 


- 


- 


- 




21 


Reconstruction Association, Inc. 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


22 


Robert B. Brigham Hospital for Incurables 


1,739,201 00 


- 


- 


1,697 14 


23 


Robert Gould Shaw House, Inc. 


500 00 


- 


6,602 98 


63 40 


24 


Robert Treat Paine Association, The 


137,038 40 


- 


- 


- 


25 


Rotch Travelling Scholarship, Inc. . 
Roxbury Boys' Club and Institute of Industry 


79.834 53 


_ 


_ 


_ 


26 


92.255 44 


10,000 00 


9,327 38 


50 00 


27 


Roxbury Charitable Society .... 


175,456 22 


- 


305 52 


- 


28 


Roxbury Female Benevolent Society 


9,668 87 


- 


12 00 


503 84 


29 


Roxbury Home for Aged Women 


317,390 57 


- 


928 72 


500 00 


30 


Roxbury Ladies' Aid and Fuel Society 


- 


- 


5,939 00 


8,777 03 


31 


Roxbury Ladies' Bikur Cholim Association 


- 


- 


3,422 34 


- 


32 


Roxbury Ladies' Club 


7,500 00 


6,500 00 


1.299 07 


_ 


33 


Roxbury Neighborhood House Association * 


49,000 00 


- 


7,024 07 


1,273 70 


34 


Rudnick Charitable Foundation, Inc. 


25,575 00 


- 


981 93 


- 


35 


Rufus F. Dawes Hotel .\ssociation . . . 


116,600 00 


_ 


_ 


6,852 25 


36 


Ruggles Street Neighborhood House ^ 




- 


- 




37 


St. Elizabeth's Hospital of Boston . 


644.000 00 


25,481 14 


41,333 21 


204,655 24 


38 


St. Elizabeth's Hospital Nurses' Alumnae Asso- 












ciation, Inc 


- 


_ 


_ 


163 00 


39 


St. Joseph's Association of Boston « . 


- 


- 


- 




4C 


St. Joseph's Home 


35,962 69 


5,000 00 


6,363 43 


11,870 45 


41 


St. Luke's Home for Convalescents . 


258,837 42 


- 


2,084 50 


2,082 43 


42 


St. Mary's Lnfant Asylum and Lying-in Hospital 


250,000 00 


- 


42.105 56 


91,034 71 


43 


St. Vincent's Orphan Asylum .... 


112,200 00 


- 


2.834 43 


24,384 67 


44 


Salvation Army of Massachusetts, Inc. 


3,239,950 58 


1,302,320 90 


150.875 05 


326,251 76 


45 


Sanders Fund, Inc 


- 


- 


17,465 44 


- 


46 


Scientific Temperance Federation 


4,667 50 


_ 


7,752 97 


2,711 11 


47 


Scots' Charitable Society 


58,916 27 


- 


530 00 


- 


48 


Sears and Other Funds, Trustees of . 


292,606 59 


_ 


_ 


_ 


49 


Sedalia Club Inc., The 




- 


2.463 10 


- 


50 


Seiaphic Institute, Inc. of Boston, Mass. . 


19,000 00 


4,500 00 


13,283 54 


- 


51 


Shaw Fund for Mariners' Children . 


593,207 38 


- 


- 


- 


52 


Society for Ministerial Relief .... 


292,170 27 


_ 


- 


_ 


53 


Society for the Relief of Aged or Disabled Episco- 












pal Clergymen 


162,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


54 


Society for the Relief of the Widows and Orphans 
of Clergymen of the Protestant Episcopal 












Church 


224,896 33 


— 


6.000 00 


_ 


55 


Society of St. Margaret (St. Monica's Home) 


25,001 77 


- 


6,879 47 


- 



No reF>ort. 



2 Organizations aided. 



' Not stated. 



P.D. 17, Part II. 
Charitable Corporations 



Continued. 



Interest. 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 


Legacies 
specifically 
restricted 
to Capital 


Unrestricted 
Legacies 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 

Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 

Number 

aided 


Total 

Number 

Free 


Number 

of 

Families 

aided 


- 


- 


- 


$65 94 
4,883 05 


$815 25 


_ 
2 


292 


7 


- 


1 

2 


$657 95 


- 


- 


705 37 


- 


- 


28 


_3 


-3 


3 


24 70 


- 


~ 


18,230 05 


9,362 72 


3 


~ 


- 


- 


4 
5 


1,946 71 


- 


- 


1,983 71 


- 


- 


25 


- 


- 


6 
7 


32,341 94 


- 


- 


49,956 18 


_ 


- 


218 


218 


- 


8 


30 21 


- 


$1,764 57 


43,107 36 
2,978 21 
5,570 41 


13,648 91 
671 96 


6 
1 


25 

22 


i 


\ 


9 
10 
11 


220,493 13 

9,667 83 

214,659 78 


$2,500 00 




207,503 81 

9,667 83 

517,428 06 


7,300 00 
750 00 
-1 


2 

2 

255 


1152 
12 

12,796 


1.118 


- 


12 

13 
14 
15 

16 
17 


27,119 19 


20,867 33 


- 


24,364 72 


440 00 


_ 


100 


_3 


_3 


18 

19 
20 


197,077 40 
26 28 


- 


- 


84.717 13 
7,247 33 


_4 

4,489 15 


43 

8 


56 
470 


56 


- 


21 
22 
23 


10,466 47 


- 


- 


9.431 47 


706 00 


3 


{ «J 

3 

f 22 

\ 33 
26 


} - 

3 


_3 


24 


3,651 82 

865 35 
8,401 73 


250 00 


: 


3,739 17 
10,091 90 
10,755 96 


6,934 76 


12 


194 


25 
26 
27 


597 28 


- 


- 


1,322 34 


- 


- 


) :, 


-3 


28 


15,663 64 


2,000 00 


60 06 


15,467 62 


5,303 35 


8 


- 


29 


60 69 


- 


- 


4,106 13 


897 75 


1 


/ 102 

1 90 


}' -' 


- 


30 


93 17 


- 


- 


3,508 39 


471 48 


1 


J 12 

1 104 


I 104 


_» 


31 


218 55 


- 


- 


246 38 
8,135 38 


55 00 
6,032 35 


16 


32 
2,075 


1,185 


- 


32 
33 


2,167 81 


- 


- 


1,025 00 


- 


- 


f 102 

\ 1 


) : 


- 


34 


288 00 


- 


- 


7,403 96 


4,614 19 


10 




- 


35 


10,302 84 


- 


- 


254,455 10 


_4 


94 


8,020 


1,337 


- 


36 
37 


18 68 


- 


- 


260 61 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


38 


542 09 

20,430 05 

1,691 69 

2,591 81 


6,000 00 


5,000 00 
10,614 71 
6,707 41 


10,589 30 
24,174 13 
90,276 48 
20.905 93 


1,989 00 
10,8C5 09 

-4 

3,198 00 


11 
10 
44 
20 


292 

308 

1,484 

150 


217 

182 

16 

25 


_3 


39 
40 
41 
42 
43 


707 22 


117,350 48 


- 


483,205 52 


80,900 52 


235 


/ 342 
344,763 


1 154,369 


6,419 


44 


17 16 


- 


- 


16,885 65 


1,225 00 




J 102 

\ 181 


1 181 
291 

8 

-J 


29 


45 


360 04 
3,174 09 
19,892 82 

37 10 
25,419 38 
16,168 36 


- 


1,000 00 


11.226 86 
3,523 85 
19,668 58 
2,562 53 
10,469 65 
23.434 19 
14,708 61 


6,893 74 

500 00 

1,900 00 
3,100 00 




291 
32 

12 

53 

321 

43 


118 
2 

198 


46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 


7,651 86 


- 


- 


6,700 00 


- 


- 


8 


8 


- 


53 


8,171 64 
429 35 


- 


1,500 00 


11.815 31 
10,944 39 


_4 


8 


76 
64 


76 
14 


- 


54 
55 



* Not separately reported. 



5 Report for 8 months. 



• Report not due. 



80 



P.D. 17, Part II. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Total 
Property 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 



Subscrip- 
tions, Dona- 
tions, etc. 



BosTOV — Con. 
Soldiers and Sailors Relief Society of Ward 18 
Boston' 



South Boston Lithuanian Benevolent Soc: 

South Boston Neighborhood House 
South Boston Samaritan Society 
South End Day Nursery 
South End Day Nursery Auxiliary 

South End Diet Kitchen . 

South End Dispensary and Hospital 
South End House Association, The 
South End Music School 
Stamp Saving Society 

Stearns Fund, Inc. 



ety 



Students' House Corporation 
Sunnyside Day Nursery' . 
Swedish Home of Peace (" Fridhem" 
Swiss Benevolent Society . 
SjTian Burial Society' 

S^Tian Ladies' Aid Society, The 

Syrian National Society, The ' . 
Tabernacle Society of Boston, The 
Temporary Home for Working Women ^ 
Travelers' Aid Society of Boston, Inc. 
Tremont Dispensary, The . 
Tiinity Church Home for the Aged (Rachel L 
Allen Memorial) 

Trinity Neighborhood House and Day Nursery 

Union Beige Benevolent Association, Inc, 

Union Rescue Mission 

Unitarian Campaign, Inc. . 

Unitarian Service Pension Society . 

I'nited Hebrew Benevolent Association of Boston 

Vernon Advent Christian Home 

Vincent Memorial Hospital 

War Service Association, Div. 20 

Washingtonian Home . 

Welcome House, Inc. . 

Wells Memorial Association 

West End Matan Basaiser Charitable Association 

Widows' Society in Boston, The 

Winchester Home for Aged Women 

Woman's Auxiliary of the New England Baptist 

Hospital 

Woman's Auxiliary Board of the Scots' Charitable 

Society . 

Woman's Board of Missions (Congregational) 
Woman's Charity Club . . 

Woman's Home Missionary A.ssociation 
Woman's Home Missionary Society of the New 

England Conference of the Methodist Episcopal 

Church ..... 
Woman's Seaman's Friend Society 
Woman's Universalist MLssionary Society of Mas 

sachusetts . . ... 

Women's Educational and Industrial Union 
Women's Educational and Industrial Union 

Tru.stees of 

Women's Industrial Association of Roxbury 

Women's Scholarship Association' 

Wood Memorial Home .... 



Working Girls' Home (St. Helena's Hou.se) 
Young Men's FMucational Aid Association' 
Young Men's Hebrew Association of Boston 
Young Travellers' Aid Society, The 

BOXFORD. 

Female Charitable Society of West Boxford 

Braintree. 
Braintree Friendly Aid Association . 
Braintree Young Men's Christian Association 



$17,500 00 

23,200 00 

1,000 00 

42,628 25 



55,356 34 

92,262 75 

47.000 00 

7,712 50 

79,400 00 
11,000 00 



15,000 00 

3,000 00 

97,500 00 
30,745 00 

76,480 00 

364,375 25 

20,050 00 

7,500 00 

323,449 71 

137,229 64 
40,707 00 
61,100 00 

272,278 49 
171,493 64 



14,946 59 

467,831 24 

43,100 00 



28,550 00 
13,658 87 



44,416 72 
28,036 05 



702,183 



642,788 78 
264,250 00 



100,000 CO 
23,502 95 



1,500 CO 



110,500 00 
4,000 00 



25,000 00 
12,000 00 



55,000 00 
6,000 00 



4,000 00 
10,000 00 



345,000 00 



22,000 00 
25,000 00 



$617 50 

1,509 00 

6 50 

4,467 00 

10 00 

3,756 50 

6,695 75 

29,231 22 

5,615 59 



43,624 71 
1,701 89 

1,650 07 
208 00 

2,136 24 

2,123 99 

4,080 00 

20,155 25 

11,575 00 

4,909 77 

104 40 

11,800 09 

279,573 97 

10,225 40 

3,675 47 
8,449 03 



10,625 09 
13,641 00 

800 50 
6,295 00 

992 30 

1,017 25 

1.084 04 

320,243 64 

2,606 20 

86,760 57 



7,635 29 
4,144 06 



6,987 77 
25,616 34 



391 25 



3,902 18 
85 00 



33 44 
,209 84 



' No report. 



2 Organizations aided. 



3 Not stated. 



P.D. 17, Part II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



81 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 


Legacies 
specifically 
restricted 
to Capital 


Unrestricted 
Legacies 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 
Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 

Number 

aided 


Total 

Number 

Free 


Number 

of 

Families 

aided 




$2,368 50 


- 


- 


$4,090 17 


$1,400 00 


1 


( V 


} ^ 

-3 


1 


1 

2 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2,281 89 


1,560 50 


3 




_ 


3 


45 50 


_ 


- 


52 00 


_ 


- 


_3 


_3 


_3 


4 


1,364 47 


- 


- 


7,554 21 


3,241 60 


7 


7,798 


_3 


_ 


5 


80 75 


- 


- 


3.365 21 


- 


- 


12 


- 


- 


6 


3,024 80 


- 


- 


6,088 70 


1,237 50 


1 


/ 1^ 
1 97 


} 97 
2,200 


52 


7 


239 49 


_ 


- 


6,823 96 


4,413 42 


6 


3,000 


-3 


8 


1,749 76 


_ 


$10,000 00 


48,984 25 


25,035 84 


30 


6.100 


100 


_ 


9 


58 84 


_ 


- 


15.229 27 


11,774 55 


32 


448 


23 


_ 


10 


472 63 


- 


- 


399 36 


260 00 


1 






_ 


11 


- 


- 


- 


31.837 09 


250 00 


- 


/ 882 

1 77 


} 7e 


35 


12 


188 50 


- 


- 


46,266 68 


11,424 55 


13 


96 


-3 


13 


_ 


_ 


_ 


5,784 83 


_ 
1,216 60 


2 


139 


3 


_3 


14 
15 


52 91 


- 


- 


222 10 


- 


- 


- 


- 


8 


16 
17 


- 


- 


- 


2,137 27 




- 


f 12 

I 6 


' r 


11 


18 


10 70 


: 


I 


1,893 25 


I 


: 


32 


32 


~ 


19 
20 


5,201 55 


$2,000 00 


5,032 78 


10,598 33 


4,262 89 


2 


778 


_3 


_3 


21 


17 21 


- 


- 


20,805 47 


18,441 61 


12 


29,169 


-3 


_3 


22 


151 27 


- 


- 


327 50 


- 


- 


12 


- 


- 


23 


107 90 


- 


1,780 88 


20,415 66 


7,973 85 


7 


31 


- 


-3 


24 


1,251 67 


- 


- 


6,716 52 


3,755 57 


7 


/ 32 

284 


} 20 

1 


- 


25 


36 55 


_ 


_ 


72 45 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


26 


198 20 


- 


- 


11.086 53 


6,025 40 


5 


2.600 


2,400 


250 


27 


1,465 41 


- 


- 


269,969 06 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


28 


41 37 


- 


- 


10,273 61 


- 


- 


62 


62 


_ 


29 


868 99 


- 


- 


868 99 


- 


- 






_ 


30 


68 00 


- 


- 


6,248 92 


2,254 60 


3 


8 


- 


_ 


31 


12,374 96 


12,100 00 


- 


41,259 32 


_4 


19 


326 


77 


- 


32 


_ 


_ 


— 


317 12 


— 


— 


12 


_ 


-3 


33 


6,868 43 


- 


- 


23,033 90 


7,763 71 


12 


931 


51 


_ 


34 


1,033 19 


- 


- 


17,433 58 


5,300 00 


9 


207 


206 


_ 


35 


6.923 70 


- 


- 


22,305 81 


9,689 93 


14 


1,933 


- 


- 


36 


_ 


_ 


_ 


790 50 


140 50 


1 


100 


_3 


_3 


37 


13,585 36 


5,032 78 


- 


20,030 36 


750 00 


1 


130 


130 


_ 


38 


8,849 41 


5,000 00 


- 


18,198 60 


6,530 42 


9 


36 


35 


- 


39 


4 74 


- 


- 


897 20 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


40 


899 06 


_ 


_ 


1,368 05 


_ 


_ 


25 


25 


13 


41 


13,909 27 


41,000 00 


26,392 27 


309.103 58 


23,699 11 


18 


- 


- 




42 


4,589 24 


- 


- 


493 85 


- 


- 


42 


- 


_ 


43 


4,986 81 


- 


2,412 59 


105,119 88 


4,400 CO 


3 


_3 


_3 


-3 


44 


2 85 






11,725 19 


5,946 25 


12 


_3 


_3 


_3 


45 


817 98 


- 


- 


5,319 87 


3,187 00 


_3 


-3 


_3 


_3 


46 


2,079 86 


3,338 00 


_ 


8,477 04 


_ 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


47 


- 


- 


- 


1,114,959 20 


330,488 53 


350 


- 


- 


- 


48 


1,599 43 


_ 


_ 


24,831 47 


- 


- 


12 


_ 


_ 


49 


3 72 


- 


- 


58 13 


- 


- 


18 


18 


4 


50 


25,666 02 


_ 


_ 


918 77 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


51 
52 


129 91 


- 


- 


61,610 55 


15,697 53 


30 


1,881 


386 


- 


53 


7 68 


_ 


_ 


10,504 92 


2,903 00 


2 


502 


_ 


Z3 


54 
55 


987 61 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_3 


- 


_3 


56 


- 


- 


- 


90 24 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


57 


260 70 


_ 


_ 


4.814 23 


3,234 52 


3 


570 


141 


93 


58 


~ 


~ 


~ 


101 84 


" 


" 


" 


~ 




59 



* Not separately reported. 



' Report for 18 months. 



82 



P.D. 17, Part II. 
Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Total 
Property 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 



Subscrip- 
tions, Dona- 
tions, etc. 



Bridgewateu. 
Bridgewater Visiting Nurse Association 
Millet Sanatorium .... 



Brockton. 

Brockton Day Nursery 

Brockton Hospital Company . . . . 

Brockton Humane Society, The 

Brockton Rotary Charitable and Educational 

Association 

Brockton Social Service Council, Inc. 
Brockton Visiting Nurse Association . 
Brockton Young Men's Christian Association . 
Brockton Young Women's Christian Association 
County Committee of Young Men's Christian 

Associations of Plymouth County, Massachu- 
setts, Incorporated, The^ 
Douglas Gift to the Brockton Day Nursery, 

Trustees of 

Ellis Brett Neighborhood Center of Community 

Service of Brockton, Inc. 
Family Welfare Association of Brockton 
Home for Aged Men in the City of Brockton 

Trustees of ..... . 

Mothers' League of Brockton, Inc. 1 . 

Sarah J. Pettee Memorial Scholarship Fund 

Trustees of ..... . 

Sprague Neighborhood Centre, Brockton, Inc. 
Wales Home for Aged Women . 
Woman's Club of Brockton' 



Brookline. 
American Ramabai Association . 
Brookline Day Nursery 
Brookline Friendly Society, The 

Brookline Service Club, Inc. 



Brooks Cubicle Hospital, Inc. . 
Brooks Hospital ..... 
Christian Science Benevolent Association 
Eloist Ministry, The .... 
Free Hospital for Women . 
Gulick-Farnsworth Fund, Inc. . 



Ames Foundation 
Avon Home 



Cambridge. 



Baptist Home, The .... 
Cambridge and Somerville Gemelath Chesed 

Charitable Loan Association . 
Cambridge Anti-Tuberculosis Association . 
Cambridge Homes for Aged People . 
Cambridge Hospital ..... 

Cambridge Neighborhood House, Inc. 

Cambridgeport Fruit and Flower Mission 

Cambridge Visiting Nurse Association 

Cambridge Welfare Union . . . . 
Cambridge Young Men's Christian Association i 
Cambridge Young Women's Christian Association 
Columbus Day Nursery of Cambridge i . 

East End Union of Cambridge, Massachusetts 

Harvard Legal Aid Bureau 

Holy Gho.st Hospital for Incurables . 

Lamson Home, The .... 

Middlesex Charitable Infirmaries, Inc. ^ 

Prospect Union Association ^ 

United Pentacostal Council of the Assemblies of 

God, Inc 

Wesley Foundation at Harvard University, The 

Canton. 
Canton Hospital and Nursing Association 
Canton Playground Association 



_3 

$14,000 00 


20,0C0 00 

596,227 00 

5,000 00 


9,099 87 
459,500 00 
171,800 00 


20,000 00 


156,753 82 


2,235 90 


167,487 95 


5,600 00 
10,490 00 
69,792 59 


120,2C9 00 

214,396 54 

934,762 44 

15,000 00 

2,093,512 46 

2,714 83 


8,885 05 


316,196 57 


152,253 76 


2,898 92 
344,819 76 
769,037 03 


9,740 69 


25,150 00 


29,627 18 


164,341 40 


20.000 00 


239,200 00 
15,506 00 


15,644 20 



$2,7C0 00 



40,000 00 



21,000 00 
10,000 00 



4,500 00 



70,000 CO 
9,000 00 



1,319 47 



1,500 CO 



$620 11 
1,200 00 



1,051 00 

34,412 08 

303 68 



133.038 66 
10.162 98 
35.254 21 
20,813 21 



7,479 34 



,102 94 
50 00 



2,195 49 

102 00 

27,743 45 

2.406 25 



6,000 00 

191,720 68 

5,916 24 

55,752 10 



2.750 78 


6.278 25 


329 20 


2,270 29 
2,373 00 
4,083 06 


4,289 18 


68 50 


12,450 82 


16,113 85 


14,627 47 


10,132 03 


1,680 39 



4,300 00 
1,840 75 



1 No report. 



2 Organizations aided. 



P.D. 17, Part II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



83 



Legacies 
specifically 
restricted 
to Capital 



Unrestricted 
Legacies 



Current 
Expenditures 



Salaries 

and 

Wages 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Total 

Number 

aided 



Total 

Number 

Free 



Number 

of 

Families 

aided 



$15,135 23 



5,500 00 



$1,006 27 
3,761 02 



2,000 00 



5,000 00 



12.899 01 
4,320 00 



,935 32 



9,203 30 



600 00 



,000 00 



1,500 05 
29,614 56 



12,463 61 
3,122 62 



5,500 00 



3,0C0 00 



$1,656 40 
15,829 95 



3,581 87 

141,928 76 

3,594 25 



130,253 70 
20,269 99 
68,961 46 
59,124 85 



512 77 



1,655 88 
7,550 74 



47 



100 00 

1,081 35 

10,268 63 



2,705 69 

449 34 

31,697 43 

4,732 49 



81,619 60 
252,807 89 

15,079 72 
124.302 66 



105 41 

32,403 41 

12,699 64 

1,686 50 

8,905 19 

21.721 18 

137.145 01 

6,275 20 

179 72 

16,645 99 

18,108 73 

72.236 15 

6,208 61 

60,877 71 

265 00 



1,151 45 
5,087 17 



3.533 53 
643 29 



$1,341 31 



1.365 52 

_4 

480 00 



3,424 50 
16,265 08 
35,253 64 
24,366 42 



381 04 
4,305 29 



4,871 48 



19,542 39 



7,698 45 



8,710 44 

5,233 00 

30 00 

2,865 00 
6,851 65 

_4 

4,083 44 

7,249 83 
7,351 17 

33,684 52 
3.495 15 
17.063 86 



347 50 



400 
83 



3,503 
4,232 



30.877 
9,337 



2,000 
22 

4,979 

92 

30 

792 
1,009 
9.405 
3,081 



12 

206 

3 

V 

64 

500 

60 

4,919 

72 

2,571 
80 

12 

2,803 
22 



32 
400 
120 
300 



188 
2 



131 



14.340 
5,600 



2,000 
3,768 



48 
4,950 
1,172 



38 



500 

787 

2,000 

80 

399 



120 
60 



» Not stated. 



* Not separately reported. 



84 



P.D. 17, Part II. 
Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Total 
IVopert 
repor 



'S 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 



SubscripH 
tions. Dona- 
tions, etc. 



Chelsea. 
Chelsea Day Nursery and Children's Home 
Chelsea Hebrew Charitable Ix)an .\ssociationi 
Chelsea Hebrew Sheltering Home 
Chelsea Memorial Hospital ... 

Chelsea Memorial Hospital Aid Association, Inc 
Chelsea Young Men's Christian Association 
Che\Ta Bikur Cholim of Chelsea 

Che^Ta Kadisha of Chelsea , . . , 

Hebrew Free Loan .\ssociation of Chelsea ' 
Hebrew Ladies' Charitable Association' . 
Old Ladies' Home Association of Chelsea . 
Soldiers' Home in Massachusetts, Trustees of 

Chicopee. 
Sherman Rest Home, The' . , . . 

Clinton. 

14 Clinton Home for Aged People, The . 

15 I Clinton Hospital Association . . . . 

16 ; Clinton-Lancaster Tuberculosis Association 

CoH.*.SSET. 

Beechwood Improvement Association, Inc. 

Bonnie Bairns Association 

Sandy Beach Association 

Concord. 
Concord Female Charitable Society . 
Concord's Home for the Aged . . 
New England Deaconess Association 
Women's Parish -\ssociation . . . . 

D.^XTON. 
Berkshire Animal Rescue League 
Young Men's Christian Association of Dalton . 

Dan^'ers. 
Dan vers Home for the Aged .... 
Danvers Visiting Nurse Association . 
Putnam Home Inc., The ..... 
Robert A. MacFadden Educational Fund, Inc. . 

Dedham. 
Dedham Cottage Hospital . . . 
Dedham Emergency Nursing Association . 
Dedham Temporary Home for Women and 

ChUdren 

Social Ser\-ice Board of Dedham, Inc., The 

DUXBTTRT. 

Duxbury Nurse Association, Inc., The 

Easthampton. 
Helping Hand Society 



E.A5TON. 

Eastondale Communitj' Club . . . . 

Everett. 
Che\TO KodLsho of Everett, The 

Everett Cottage Hospital 

Everett Home for Aged Persons 
Hebrew Ladies Aid Society of Everett 
New England Home for Deaf Mutes (Aged, 
Blind or Infirm) 



Fairhaven. 
Fairhaven Benevolent Association 
Ladies' Benevolent Society, The 

Fall River. 
Animal Rescue League of Fall River 
Associacao de Carridade do Ispirito Santo da 
SantissimaTrinidade 



S44,426 90 

3,000 00 
119,157 75 

_3 

100.650 00 
1,267 32 

20,000 00 



67,800 00 
724,773 45 



85,636 34 

J66,446 44 

3,938 00 



2,500 00 
25,085 31 



10,657 59 
72,328 75 
52,549 84 



29,413 50 
83,216 25 



48,987 85 



36,100 00 
1,150 00 



432 38 

_3 

65,946 30 

_3 
_3 

13,000 00 
1,500 00 



10,000 00 
28,946 49 



28,875 CO 



12,540 00 
1,200 00 



15,650 00 
2,500 00 



$1,500 00 
38,450 00 

-3 

19,000 00 



1,090 00 



700 00 



1 
Sl,889 67 


281 04 

745 60 

1,708 97 

4,436 80 

1,332 90 


2,460 00 


892 93 
223,774 00 


762 30 

14,772 84 

35 00 


78 60 


165 00 


502 00 

134 CO 

1,685 00 

129 75 


1,292 27 
4,700 00 


500 00 
3,300 47 


97 00 


4,024 60 


5.435 88 
2,990 50 


2,160 19 


3,475 03 


687 31 


670 60 

1,653 47 

273 50 


7,189 50 


690 64 


277 91 


1,668 25 


118 25 



No report. 



Organizations aided. 



P.D. 17, Part II. 

Charitable Corporations 



Continued. 



85 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 


Legacies 
specifically 
restricted 
to Capital 


Unrestricted 
Legacies 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 

Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 
• Em- 
ployees 


Total 

Number 

aided 


Total 

Number 

Free 


Number 

! of 

, Families 
aided 




S302 24 


$1,000 00 


_ 


$5,364 17 


$2,753 75 


6 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 



226 18 
1,175 26 

101 43 

6,641 20 

56 67 


- 


$150 00 


501 58 
81,253 28 

1,929 15 
22,564 17 

1,449 80 


-4 

9,005 84 
479 23 


29 

_3 

8 
2 


287 
2,658 

-3 

536 
650 


287 
22 

-3 

650 


-3 
_3 


3 
4 
5 
6 
7 


- 


- 


- 


2,981 74 


276 50 


2 


r 32 
I 39 

- 


} : 


_3 


8 
9 


3,340 45 
5,025 19 


- 


- 


4,452 70 
221,446 20 


1,764 90 
99,491 34 


3 
155 


9 

845 


9 

845 


- 


10 
11 
12 

10 


3,331 98 

5,240 60 

394 30 


- 


- 


5,492 62 

55,824 69 

611 42 


1,840 93 

-4 


4 
23 


11 
1,464 
32 


_3 


_3 


Xo 

14 
15 
16 


97 50 


- 


- 


707 76 


40 00 


1 


- 


- 


_3 


17 

1 Q 


46 03 


- 


- 


1,357 40 


725 50 


3 


9,960 


- 


_ 


18 

19 


525 00 
3,362 82 

132 17 


5,000 00 


- 


1,134 61 

3,101 81 

29,512 27 

865 37 


1,417 00 

-4 


2 
17 


_3 

4 
625 


-3 

3 
134 


-3 


20 
21 
22 
23 


1,044 86 
3,732 00 


- 


- 


2,643 54 
15,404 61 


900 00 
5,400 00 


1 

3 


12 


- 


_3 


24 
25 


2,116 74 

146 11 

1,613 70 

79 75 


- 


2,0C0 00 
1,000 00 


4,636 21 
3,803 77 
3,588 33 
1,810 00 


1,140 65 

1,673 50 

939 11 


2 

1 
4 


9 
344 
54 


9 

78 

1 


- 


26 
27 
28 
29 


29 39 
2,858 70 


_ 


- 


29 39 
7,986 30 


5,061 90 


4 


12 

518 


103 


-3 


30 
31 


3.438 52 


- 


5,715 06 


17,877 57 
2,433 48 


7,273 62 
904 00 


10 


486 

-3 


1 


87 


32 
33 


94 24 


- 


- 


2,971 24 


1,151 97 


1 


109 


15 


-3 


34 


524 08 


- 


- 


4,676 26 


1,913 90 


2 


_3 


_3 


45 


35 


45 68 


- 


- 


747 96 


205 80 


- 


- 


- 


- 


36 


102 97 

1,718 10 

19 97 


5,000 00 


- 


23,853 26 

2,436 23 

556 00 


_4 

720 06 


9 
2 


942 
5 

28 


12 


14 


37 
38 
39 
40 


1,163 75 


- 


- 


8,207 72 


3,091 00 


3 


16 


4 


- 


41 


619 32 


_ 


_ 


1,154 64 


100 00 


_ 


f 12 
I 98 


98 


19 


42 


78 


- 


- 


205 68 


- 


- 




- 


- 


43 


896 25 


1,000 00 


_ 


2,626 13 


957 00 


1 


1,400 


850 


_ 


44 


~ 


- 


- 


517 18 


- 


- 


/ 1-' 
I 10 


10 


10 


45 



» Not stated. 



* Not separately reported. 



86 



P.D. 17, Part II. 
Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Total 
Property 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estivte 



Subscrip- 
tions, Dona- 
tions, etc. 



Fall Rivkr — Con. 
Association for Community Welfare in Fall River 
Bishop 8tang Dav Nursery* .... 

Boys' Club of Fall River 

Children's Home of Fall River 
District Nursing Association of Fall River . 
East End Hebrew Gemilath Chassodim Associa- 
tion of Fall River 

Fall River Anti-Tuberculosis Society 

Fall River Deaconess Home .... 

Fall River Hebrew Women's Charitable Insti- 
tution 

Fall River High School Alumni Scholarship, 
Trustees of 

Fall River Women's Union .... 

Franciscan Missionaries of Mary of Fall River . 

Hebrew Free Loan Association of Fall River' . 

Hebrew Free School Society ' . . . . 

Hebrew Ladies* Aid Association 

Hebrew Ladies Helping Hand Society of Fall 
River» . . 

Home for Aged People in Fall River 

Mt. Lebanon Society' 

Portuguese Blessed Sacrament Association, The, 
under the name of Vetera Romana Catholica 
Ecclesia' 

RescueMissionof Fall River, Mass. ' . 

St. Anne's Hospital Corporation 

St. Joseph's Orphanage .... 

St. Vincent's Home Corporation of Fall River 

Truesdalo Hospital, Inc., The 

Union Hospital in Fall River, The 

Young Men's Christian Association of Fall River 

Falmouth. 
Falmouth Nursing Association, Incorporated . 

FiTCHBURG. 

Burbank Hospital .... 
Family Welfare Association of Fitchburg 
Fitchburg Helping Hand Association 
Fitchburg Home for 01 I Ladies • 
Fitchburg Union Aid Home for Children 
New England French American Home 
Visiting Nursing Association of Fitchburg, The 
Young Men's Christian Association of Fitchburg ' 

FOXBOROUGH. 

Doolittle Universalist Home for Aged Persons, 
Inc 

Framingham. 

Chautauqua Association, Inc 

Christian Workers Union 

Framingham Civic League, Inc. 

Framingham Hospital 

Hebrew Ladies' Aid Society of Framingham ' . 
Home for Aged Men and Women in Framingham 

Franklin. 
Franklin Playground and Garden Association' . 
Young Men's Christian Association of Franklin . 

Gardner. 
Gardner Home for Elderly People 
Henry Hey wood Memorial Hospital, The* 

Georgetown. 
C.irleton Home, Trustees of The 

Gloucester. 
Addison Gilbert Hospital ..... 

Annisquam Association, Inc 

Associated Charities of Gloucester 

Gilbert Home for Aged and Indigent Persons . 



$6,122 50 

443,594 80 
184,621 70 
23,500 00 



82,500 00 

6,000 00 

48,042 50 

122,641 68 

16,000 00 



300 00 
376,442 74 



115,000 00 
300,000 00 
150,000 00 
125.276 59 
564,543 89 
33,255 52 



2,000 00 



626,652 03 

4,751 47 

68,800 00 

130,094 77 
39,682 55 
10,700 00 
23,641 99 



30,709 28 



6,60C CO 
25,000 00 
90,000 00 
182,960 18 

75,043 46 



32,000 00 



89,410 21 
1,209,687 32 



41,267 82 



375,805 35 
7,429 08 



101,873 77 



$3,925 00 



9.000 00 



62,000 00 
36.000 00 



5,700 00 



5,000 00 
18,000 00 



$7,082 52 

7,130 43 

698 93 

20,049 01 

6 50 

295 00 

3,828 51 

300 00 



2,873 56 
3,088 60 



320 50 



484 76 



302 33 

17,383 05 

33,631 69 

12,663 70 

19,798 99 



,682 51 



30,250 00 

10,136 51 

204 25 

520 00 

1,267 40 

2,639 57 

10,224 52 



3,046 76 



5,970 58 
3,408 46 
6,987 50 

2,150 55 



,772 58 



274,814 65 



3C0 00 
680 97 



' No report. 



2 Organizations aided. 



3 Not stated. 



P.D. 17, Part II. 
Charitable Corporations 



Continued. 



87 



Legacies 
specifically 
restricted 
to Capital 



Unrestricted 
Legacies 



Current 
Expenditures 



Salaries 

and 

Wages 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Total 

Number 

aided 



Total 

Number 

Free 



Number 

of 

Families 

aided 



$5,500 00 

3,000 00 
15,082 39 
7,000 00 



15,000 00 
7.490 18 



1,500 00 



70 00 



10,100 00 



5,500 00 



$5,865 18 



,400 00 



1,000 00 
4,661 06 
1,500 00 



3,000 00 

1,000 00 
500 00 



$8,385 25 

27,211 67 

14,770 07 

56,074 02 

420 14 

2,336 65 

16,149 56 



558 75 

2,064 33 
8,091 48 
4,791 62 



575 50 



14,805 99 



52,737 55 

37,449 39 

36,322 90 

68,861 48 

192,040 45 

40,957 44 



5,137 57 



120,980 24 
7,621 29 
20,865 26 
7,323 34 
3,169 94 
3,461 65 
19,206 30 



92 



319 46 I 

10,253 54 

12,498 65 

76,884 05 

10,055 83 



3,717 42 
60.408 79 



2,355 49 



44,360 38 
1,013 71 
1,590 31 
5,833 60 



$3,904 50 

11,341 03 

6,818 88 
49,809 84 



3,474 50 



3,810 26 



7,419 30 



8,250 50 
4,928 00 



20,097 31 



918 36 



2,409 00 
5,624 35 
2,964 61 
1,598 00 
808 00 
15,322 87 



1,341 25 



4,789 00 
4.862 45 



3,378 28 



2,883 44 



1,249 35 



833 38 



564 61 
2.269 85 



_3 


_3 


87 


3,950 

64 

7,835 


20 

_3 


-3 


-3 


_ 


_3 


32 

/ 62 

I 1,111 


35 


891 


- 


- 


100 


11 

910 
505 


11 

_3 

505 


66 


I 15 


} ^^ 


_3 


29 


- 


- 


1,511 

764 

184 

1,091 

5,492 

_3 


39 
171 
106 
130 
232 


_3 
_3 

_3 


293 


61 


202 


2,391 

550 

16 

48 

36 

2,909 


864 

16 

21 

6 

2,209 


273 


9 


- 


- 


35 

-3 


2 

_3 


_3 


2,550 


35 


- 


25 


; 


~ 


6 
2,138 


5 

27 


- 


4 


4 


- 


809 


37 


- 


_3 

9 


_3 

7 


500 



Not separately reported. 



5 Report for 8 months. 



ss 



P.D. 17, Part H. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 


Incum- 


Subscrip- 


Earnings 






Property 


brances on 


tions, Dona- 


and 






reported 


Real Estate 


tions, etc. 


Refunds 




Gloucester — Con. 










1 


Gloucester District Nursing Association . 


-3 


_s 


$3,846 22 


$2,916 20 


2 


Gloucester Female Charitable Association 


$69,538 99 


_ 


14 00 


_ 


3 


Gloucester Fisherman's Institute 


76.254 92 


- 


2,948 91 


3,027 61 


4 


Gloucester Fishermen's and Seamen's Widows' 












and Orphans' Aid Society .... 


71,733 33 


- 


97 56 


- 


5 


Gloucester Hebrew Ladies' Aid Association, Inc. 


100 00 


- 


500 22 


- 


6 


Huntress Home 


40,200 00 


_ 


3,732 67 


_ 


7 


William Lawrence Camp, Inc 


2,500 00 


$1,100 00 


- 


- 


8 


Women's Clubhouse Association of Magnolia i . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


9 


Young Men's Christian Association of Gloucester 

GUE.^.T B.VRRINaXON. 


113,750 00 


~ 


12,403 06 


12,991 44 


10 


Fair^^ew Hospital i 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


11 


Visiting Nurse Association of Great Barrington, 












The 


20,500 00 


- 


6,254 59 


1,360 57 




Greenfield. 










12 


Franklin County Public Hospital 


154,836 91 


2,437 50 


5,865 87 


37,487 30 


13 


Franklin County Young Men's Christian Asso- 












ciation 


— 


— 


— 


— 


14 


Girls' Club of Greenfield. Massachusetts . 


_ 


- 


1,563 77 


145 75 


15 


Greenfield Society for the Protection of Animals 
Greenwich. 






98 25 




16 


Hillside School 

Groton. 


51,200 00 


" 


9,938 58 


14,784 77 


17 


Groton Charitable Recreation Committee Inc. i 
Hamilton. 


" 


" 


■ 




18 


Community Service of Hamilton and Wenham, 












Incorporated 


_3 


_3 


3,933 72 


2,735 32 




Hanson. 










19 


Massachusetts Branch of the International Order 


] 










of the King's Daughters and Sons (Gordon 
Rest) 


[ 10,2C0 00 


- 


1,295 04 


2,644 30 




Haverhill. 










20 


Citizens' Firemen's Relief Fund of Haverhill, Inc. 


6,736 88 


_ 


10 00 


- 


21 


Esodia Theotokou Scalohoriton Lesvou, Inc. i . 




_ 


- 


- 


22 


Essex North Branch Auxiliary to the Woman's 












Board of Missions of Bo-ston, The . 


_3 


-3 


60 43 


- 


23 


Family Welfare Society of Haverhill i 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


24 


General Gale Hospital Aid Association 


- 


- 


40 81 


10 45 


25 


Hale Hospital 


336,496 20 


- 


1,163 54 


75,782 57 


26 


Haverhill Boys' Club Association 


89,484 19 


1,200 00 


3,523 38 


937 46 


27 


Haverhill Children's Aid Society 


98,883 90 


- 


1,147 50 


2,102 79 


28 


Haverhill College Club, (Incorporated) 


- 


- 


320 58 


45 00 


29 


Haverhill Day Nursery Association . 


26,017 25 


_ 


1,759 65 


1,950 55 


30 


Haverhill Female Benevolent Society 


112,043 88 


- 


68 50 


- 


31 


Haverhill Master House Painters and Decorators 












Association 


_ 


_ 


239 00 


182 50 


32 


Haverhill Teachers' Association, Incorporated . 


- 


- 


672 00 


1,904 48 


33 


Haverhill Union Mission, Inc 


13,520 00 


5,500 00 


316 71 


- 


34 


Haverhill Young Men's Christian Association . 


115,000 00 


1,000 00 


4,186 50 


4,374 00 


35 


Haverhill Young Women's Christian Association 


30,984 03 


- 


664 89 


13,460 20 


36 


Linwood O. Towne Scholarship Association, Inc., 












Thei 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


37 


Mary F. Ames Convalescent Home Inc., The i . 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


38 


Old Ladies' Home Association .... 


181,621 27 


- 


871 50 


2,146 88 


39 


Progressive Society of Kalloniaton, Arisbe, The 


_ 


- 


499 00 


150 00 


40 


Social Circle of Portland Street Church i . 

HOLDEN. 


" 








41 


Holden Hospital, Incorporated 


51,714 76 


24,000 00 


30,787 06 


10,259 17 


42 


Holden Visiting Nurse Association, Inc. i . 

HOLYOKE. 


■ 








43 


Holyoke Boys' Club Association i . . . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


44 


Holyoke City Hospital 


_3 


- 


19,556 49 


94,900 03 


45 


Holyoke Day Nursery, Inc 


100,000 00 


14,000 00 


8,095 51 


6,079 31 


46 


Holyoke District Nurse Association, Inc. . 




~ 


5,727 56 


5,322 89 



No report. 



2 Organizations aided. 



P.D. 17, Part 11. 

Charitable Corporations 



Continued. 



89 



Legacies 
specifically 
restricted 
to Capital 



Unrestricted 
Legacies 



Current 
Expenditures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Total 

Number 

aided 



Total 

Number 

Free 



Number 

of 

Families 

aided 



S5,000 00 



10,000 00 



13,428 65 



$500 00 



150 00 



250 00 



3,003 33 

5,000 00 

500 00 

1,000 00 



50 00 
250 84 

250 84 



1,003 33 



111,416 95 



S5,418 80 

2,719 42 

9,652 89 

3,847 75 

394 86 

5,771 43 

294 25 



33,698 



12,235 92 
53,994 36 



2,757 58 
38 25 



21,401 14 



7,298 51 



5,412 82 



00 



3,172 57 

66 00 

96,043 14 

6,649 43 

7,945 43 

3,908 91 
4,243 27 

459 32 
3,152 56 
3,332 94 

14,860 75 
17,700 72 



12,088 98 
5 00 



17,200 74 



107,954 20 
12,443 67 
11,784 02 



S4,107 62 

250 GO 
4,781 43 

250 01 

2,378 24 

12,528 61 



6,633 26 
19,737 94 



1,379 04 
38 25 



7,459 02 



4,030 07 



1,346 00 



18 25 
12 00 



4,242 37 
2,099 44 



1,079 95 
650 00 



955 12 
10,971 04 

7,453 43 



4,673 37 



_4 

2,303 26 
10,718 78 



22 
991 



IIO.OCO 



2 

5 

6 

350 



252 
7,700 



412 
939 



160 
50 



59 



12 

350 



1,285 
20 
142 



502 
2,200 
22 
2,170 



27 



375 



2,307 

405 

1,880 



119 


444 


_ 


62 


-3 


_3 


5 


_ 


6 


_ 


- 


_3 


3,200 


_3 


136 


- 


17 


- 


-3 


_3 


50 


- 


3 


- 


_3 


-3 


18 


_3 


- 


_3 


- 


-3 


_ 


_3 


17 




12 


42 


8 


90 


~ 


106 


207 


52 


1,000 


-3 


600 


- 


27 


- 


27 


_ 


54 


- 


295 


151 


656 


"'1 



' Not stated. 



* Not separately reported. 



90 



P.D. 17, Part II. 
Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 


Incum- 


Subscrip- 


Earnings 






Property 


brances on 


tions, Dona- 


and 






reported 


Real Estate 


tions, etc. 


Refunds 




HOLYOKE — Con. 










1 


Holyoke Home for Aged People .... 


$153,800 00 


- 


$2,732 92 


$2,357 44 


2 


Holyoke Young Men's Christian Association . 


437,154 07 


$85,000 00 


10,954 43 


16,473 36 


3 


Sisters of Providence (Heaven-Kelly Home) 


70,000 00 


- 


252 20 


12,152 69 


4 


Sisters of Providence (Brightside Orphans' and 












Bethlehem Homes) 


141,000 00 


5,000 00 


14,779 05 


37,768 29 


5 


Sisters of Providence (House of Providence Hos- 
pital and Father Harkins' Home for Aged 












Women) 


150,000 00 


_ 


111 50 


99,569 74 


6 


Sisters of Providence (Mt. St. Vincent Home for 












Girls) 


65,000 00 


_ 


4,788 98 


24,321 17 


7 


Skinner Coffee House, Incorporated . 


50,000 00 


- 


8,000 00 


11,127 26 


8 


White Cross Association for Graduate Nurses of 












Holyoke, Mass. 


2,103 33 


_ 


27 45 


25 00 


9 


Young Women's Christian Association of Hol- 












yoke 


118.200 00 


- 


10,859 99 


21,245 48 




HOPEDALE. 










10 


Hopedale Community House, Inc. . 
Ipswich. 


203,566 46 


~ 


53,528 00 


■ 


11 


Coburn Charitable Society .... 


195,457 53 


_ 


_ 


989 31 


12 Ipswich Hospital (Operating Benjamin Stickney 










Cable Memorial Hospital)! . . . . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Lancaster. 










13 Charitable Fund in the Town of Lancaster, 










! Trustees of 


12,376 70 


- 


- 


- 


14 i Lancaster Social Service Association . 


11,518 25 


_ 


1,294 21 


807 75 


15 


Nathaniel Thayer Playground Association 
Lawrence. 




' 


218 00 


1,950 00 


16 


Asrath Noshim i 


- 


- 


- 


- 


17 


Columbian Charitable Guild of Lawrence, The . 


- 


- 


184 86 


- 


18 


German Old Folks Home of Lawrence, Massa- 












chusetts 


14,600 00 


- 


793 56 


2,225 26 


19 


Hebrew Ladies' Progressive Association of 












LawTencei 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


20 


Incorporated Protectory of Mary Immaculate . 


130,800 00 


- 


3,375 98 


28,834 37 


21 


Ladies' Hebrew Council 


_ 


_ 


— 


— 


22 


LawTence Boys' Club 


49,709 83 


_ 


5,982 00 


1.816 92 


23 


LavsTcnce City Mission 


16,500 00 


2,000 00 


9,995 31 


5,455 29 


24 


Lawrence General Hospital .... 


597,855 70 


- 


22,917 93 


86,140 99 


25 


Lawrence Home for Aged People 


386,820 10 


- 


2,647 56 


11,864 77 


26 


Lawrence Young Men's Christian Association . 


229,990 69 


- 


14,529 87 


25,569 60 


27 


LawTence Young Women's Christian Association 


64,991 30 


6,000 00 


25,316 28 


14,770 21 


28 


Russell-Hood Trust, Incorporated 


23,000 00 


_ 


_ 


_ 


29 


Syrian National Club 1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


30 


United Hebrew Ladies' Free Loan Association . 


- 


- 


164 20 


135 03 


31 


Lee. 
Ascension Farm School, Corp'n of the^ 

Leicester. 


- 


- 


- 


- 


32 


Leicester Samaritan Association 
Leominster. 


4,658 31 




98 00 


518 34 


33 


Leominster Home for Old Ladies 


113,832 82 


- 


- 


- 


34 


Leominster Hospital Association 
Lexington. 


258,291 86 


56,700 00 


20 00 


16,756 29 


35 


Lexington Home for Aged People 
Lincoln. 


29,972 63 


' 


3,157 63 


1,166 00 


36 


Farrington Memorial Incorporated, The . 

LONQME.\.DOW. 


283,891 48 








37 


Doane Orphanage, The 

Longmeadow Community Hou.se Association, 


61,335 49 


- 


7,357 88 


4,569 26 


38 












Inc 


- 


- 


740 42 


4,734 29 




Lowell. 










39 


Ayer Home, Trustees of ... . 


349,621 22 


- 


- 


1,584 33 


40 


Battles Home, The 


51,952 45 


4,000 00 


77 80 


2,100 00 


41 


Channing Fraternity 


8,092 82 


~ 


17 00 


" 



No report. 



2 Organizations aided. 



P.D. 17, Part II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



91 



Legacies 
specifically 
restricted 
to Capital 



Unrestricted 
Legacies 



Current 
Expenditures 



Salaries 

and 
Wages 



Average 
Number Total 
of Paid Number 

Em- aided 
ployees 



Total 



Number 
^^^^^"'•i Families 



Free 



aided 



$200 00 



8,258 56 



250 00 



11,009 25 



2,000 00 
5,000 00 



2,040 00 



10,000 00 



2,500 00 



$755 00 
1,735 00 

1,822 34 
700 00 



190 00 



6,000 00 
75,000 00 



1,050 00 



SI 1,594 22 
46,119 40 
12,157 40 

55,286 64 



88,384 43 



24,193 66 
19,115 97 



38,422 30 
2,327 05 
9,745 34 



542 00 
1,988 92 
2,073 70 



350 31 

5,624 55 

36,245 56 

6,989 05 

18,090 73 

127,491 57 

12,834 12 

56,884 37 

32,735 97 

1,035 00 

133 15 



1,485 47 



5,654 39 
19,285 74 



5,316 61 

6,502 13 

18,482 64 

8,280 52 



15.476 28 

2,435 43 

47 50 



$4,703 00 


7 


23 


20 




-4 


13 


3,934 


1,967 


- 


1,402 50 


5 


86 


1 


- 


4,131 32 


16 


490 


13 


_ 


_4 


40 


3,946 


311 




2,271 62 


5 


225 


2 


_ 


9,070 60 


10 


5,800 


700 


- 


15,199 31 


16 


_3 

_ 


- 


_3 


3,796 25 


6 


329 


329 


-3 

- 






16 


_3 


-3 


1,500 00 


1 


-3 


- 


_3 


979 10 


5 


218 


125 


" 


- 


- 


{ xr 


} 


- 


1,225 40 


4 


12 


- 


- 


6,807 40 


35 


275 


47 


- 


4,253 65 


4 


1,729 


_ 


_ 


7,874 20 


4 


_3 


-3 


75 


-4 


53 


5,026 


197 


- 


4,124 30 


7 


35 


- 


- 


27,629 11 


15 


3,186 


957 


_3 


6,420 27 


25 


/ 22 
1 65,903 


} 22,428 

_3 


_3 


- 


- 


{ A' 


} 


-3 


1,254 52 


_ 


173 


- 


-3 


1,780 00 


3 


8 


8 


_ 


-4 


17 


663 


24 




2,284 44 


2 


9 


8 


- 


813 60 


8 


88 


- 


- 


6,774 53 


9 


46 


6 




1,927 73 


2 


-3 


- 


-' 


4,405 55 


15 


173 


173 


_ 


671 65 


2 


15 


- 


- 


~ 


~ 


" 


~ 


" 



3 Not stated. 



* Not separately reported. 



92 



P.D. 17, Part II. 

Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Total 
Property 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 



Subscrip- 
tions, Dona- 
tions, etc. 



Lowell — Con. 

Children's Home 

Faith Home ...... 

Florence Crittenton Rescue League of Lowell 
Ladies' Gmeloos Chasodem Association, The' 
Ladies' Helping Hand Society, The^ 

Lowell Boys' Club Association . 

Lowell Community Service (Incorporated) 
Lowell Corporation Hospital . 
Lowell Day Nursery Association 

Lowell Dispensary 

Lowell General Hospital .... 

Lowell Good Will Industries, Inc. 

Lowell Guild of Lowell . . . . , 
Lowell Humane Society, The ... 
Lowell Particular Council of the Society of St 

Vincent de Paul 

Lowell Social Service League ... 
Lowell Young Men's Christian Association 

Ministry-at-Large in Lowell, Mass. . 

Old Ladies' Home 

L'Orphelinat Franco-Americain 

Pan Thessalian Mutual Aid Society, Regas 

Pherraeos' 

Roman Catholic Archbishop of Boston (St 

Peter's Orphan Asylum) .... 
St. John's Hospital 

Young Women's Christian Association of Lowell 

Ludlow. 
Ludlow Hospital Society ' 

Lynn. 

Aid Society of Lynn Day Nursery . 

Associated Charities of Lynn 

Boys' Club of Lynn ..... 

Charitable Travelers' Sheltering Association, Inc 

Columbus Guild of Lynn .... 

Eliza J. Hahn Home for Aged Couples 

Jewish Associated Charities of Lynn . 

Lynn Home for Aged Men .... 

Lynn Home for Aged Women 

Lynn Home for Children .... 

Lynn Home for Young Women . 

Lynn Hospital 

Lynn Jewish Orphans Relief Association . 
Lynn Tuberculosis League . 
Massachusetts Christian Endeavor Association 
Neighborhood House Association 

Pullman Mission 



Union Hospital 

Women's Union for Christian Work . 

Young Men's Christian Association of Lynn 



Malden. 
Associated Charities of Maiden . 
Girls' Club Association of Maiden, Inc. 

Maiden Anti-Tuberculosis Society, Inc. 



Maiden Arbeiter Ferein, Inc. 

Maiden Hebrew Free Loan Association! . 
Maiden High School Scholarship 
Maiden Home for Aged Persons 

Maiden Hospital 

Maiden Industrial Aid Society . 
Maiden War Chest Association i . 
Maiden Young Men's Christian Association 
Midvedifka Association .... 
Monday Club of Maiden .... 



$11,025 00 
4,500 00 



44,749 32 



98,745 44 

4,742 85 

700,224 12 

15,100 CO 

_3 

32,296 80 



390,162 55 

85,998 88 

220,643 84 
250,000 00 



100,000 00 
612,346 00 

99,890 60 



14,318 49 

16,979 00 
46,434 03 
5,0C0 00 
21,434 51 
81,020 98 

151,108 94 

231,141 97 

50,000 00 

78,416 25 

662,286 84 

1,512 34 



20.500 00 

1,400 27 

42,350 00 
9,700 00 

423,709 21 



14,299 54 
10,050 00 

400 00 



9,544 37 

159,582 39 

416,844 82 

78,969 93 

121,000 00 

100 00 



S 10,000 00 
8,000 00 



1,000 00 



2,000 00 
4,5C0 00 



,000 00 



3,000 00 



$751 63 
1,140 65 



5,025 00 

44,000 00 
150 00 

5,020 00 

3,442 97 

11,380 83 
3,591 23 

443 01 
4,602 76 
9,229 57 



1,788 56 
6,213 93 



2,682 85 
572 00 

13,299 84 



8,612 75 

10,689 17 

72 00 

1,096 51 

1,484 58 

15 00 

3,306 88 

10 00 

2,468 29 

402 38 

461 75 

298 75 

1,244 63 

44 00 

11,448 48 

1,185 50 

400 GO 
50 00 

27,036 75 



1,479 50 
1,186 75 

1,020 55 
341 50 



5,748 94 
1,788 04 
1,608 28 

8,881 50 

21 GO 

482 51 



I No report. 



2 Organizations aided. 



P.D. 17, Part II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



93 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 


Legacies 
specifically 
restricted 
to Capital 


Unrestricted 
Legacies 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 

Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 

Number 

aided 


Total 

Number 

Free 


Number 

of 

Families 

aided 




$109 13 






$2,455 3r 


$1,078 71 


5 


60 


20 




J 




- 


$823 58 


1,091 82 


• 201 61 


1 


_3 




_3 


2 


22 50 


- 


_ 


1,716 89 


1,200 00 


1 


103 


98 


_ 


3 

4 


1,380 52 


$1,000 00 


- 


5,642 02 


3,324 80 


2 


/ 102 

1 1,500 


} 1,500 


_ 


5 
6 


13 29 


- 


- 


59 00 


- 


- 




- 


_ 


7 




- 


- 


84,092 74 


27.031 56 


33 


8,425 


31 


- 


8 


4,723 08 


- 


- 


5,739 14 


1.746 07 


5 


119 


11 


66 


9 


216 83 


- 


- 


146 04 


- 


- 


22 


- 


_3 


10 


32,076 27 


- 


- 


89,193 06 


-4 


38 


2,266 


108 


- 


11 


- 


- 


- 


18,156 90 


14.805 70 


21 


1 192 
3,787 


50 


- 


12 


188 84 


_ 


_ 


21,710 20 


16.456 28 


12 


2,197 


_:i 


13 


1,205 00 


- 


- 


4,761 79 


3.174 25 


3 


- 


- 


- 


14 


21 43 


_ 


_ 


775 51 


_ 


_ 


3,195 


3,195 


_ 


15 




- 


- 


4,409 19 


3,080 04 


2 


- 


- 


215 


16 


2,057 81 


- 


- 


52,311 84 


22,612 37 


15 


f 12 
I 2,317 


- 


- 


17 


3,338 93 


- 


- 


3,848 51 


900 00 


1 


] 2.317 


445 


18 


8,113 11 


_ 


11,367 31 


12,881 88 


3,395 25 


7 


43 


^ _3 


_ 


19 


937 84 


- 


- 


46,920 19 


7,353 12 


34 


274 


36 


- 


20 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


21 


_ 


_ 


_ 


13,696 00 


2,109 80 


1 


225 


22 


_:; 


22 


959 94 


- 


- 


87,251 08 


_4 


42 


4,244 


72 


- 


23 


8,250 72 


- 


- 


56,509 83 


16.625 19 


30 


/ 42 
1 3,096 


} 921 


122 


24 


- 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


25 


431 77 


_ 


5,000 00 


13,205 72 


4,158 74 


5 


f 62 

1 1,070 


} 1,024 


49 


26 


1,729 62 


5,000 00 


_ 


14,109 90 


4,019 48 


3 




_ 


850 


27 


2,117 55 


- 


5,000 00 


6,233 56 


4,433 31 


20 


- 


- 


- 


28 


240 00 


- 


- 


1,183 17 


182 12 


2 


250 


250 


- 


29 


. 10 61 


_ 


- 


7,167 75 


2,025 02 


4 


29 


6 


35 


30 


4,414 78 


- 


5.000 00 


4.529 91 


2,249 50 


3 


10 


10 




31 




_ 


_ 


3,724 67 


378 40 


_ 


41 


- 


_ 


32 


9,152 57 


1,250 00 


11,042 53 


6,243 39 


1,360 48 


2 


7 


- 


- 


33 


11,614 50 


- 


10,050 00 


12.008 16 


3,801 85 


5 


28 


28 


- 


34 


2,531 08 


- 


- 


5.270 29 


1,560 89 


6 


28 


4 


49 


35 


4,133 05 


5,000 00 


- 


18.731 81 


6,555 89 


10 


1,710 


240 


116 


36 


18,533 85 


55,675 00 


3,000 00 


138,130 40 


-4 


63 


11.681 


401 


- 


37 


_ 


- 


- 


1,055 84 


- 


- 


35 


- 


_3 


38 


6 96 


- 


- 


1.846 69 


1,500 00 


1 


- 


- 


- 


39 


16 16 


- 


- 


719 50 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


40 


676 64 


- 


200 00 


8,454 10 


4,254 76 


21 


1,261 

f 82 
I 14 


391 

} - 


45 


41 


1,805 89 


- 


- 


4,674 26 


- 


- 


17 


42 


128 65 


- 


- 


60.909 91 


_4 


22 


1,542 


50 


- 


43 


705 99 


- 


3,000 00 


1,175 01 


120 00 


1 


f 42 
\ 25,895 


} 20,000 


- 


44 


344 28 


- 


5,000 00 


142,958 22 


48,221 73 


48 


_3 


45 


333 34 




11,000 00 


2.711 25 


2,003 64 


2 


_3 


_ 


365 


46 


13 29 


- 


- 


5.165 67 


1,433 50 


2 


200 


150 


- 


47 


64 58 


- 


- 


981 51 


- 


- 


/ 22 

17 


I _3 


-3 


48 


- 


- 


- 


712 41 


1 50 


- 


42 
9 


- 


9 


49 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


50 


441 54 


_ 


- 


566 63 


- 


- 


4 


4 


_3 


51 


4,815 79 


- 


11,500 00 


13,561 94 


4,696 76 


7 


23 


23 


- 


52 


16,320 51 


- 


11,500 00 


106.177 90 


-4 


39 


2,054 


22 


- 


53 


2,296 29 


- 


- 


6,681 45 


3,575 00 


5 


3,707 


1,451 


74 


54 


15,219 66 


_ 


_ 


36,926 17 


14,472 01 


8 


1,378 


- 


_ 


00 

56 




_ 


_ 


2 30 


_ 


— 


— 


— 


_ 


57 


18 35 


- 


- 


1,057 00 


705 48 


4 


125 


~ 


- 


58 



* Not stated. 



* Not separately reported. 



94 



P.D. 17, Part II. 
Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 
Property 
reported 


Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 


Subscrip- 
tions. Dona- 
tions, etc. 


Earnings 

and 
Refunds 


I 

2 
3 


Malde.v — Con. 

White Ribbon Home, Inc 

Young Men's Hebrew Association of Maiden . 
Young Women's Hebrew Association of Maiden » 


$18,900 00 
6.000 00 


$5,000 GO 
4.000 00 


$1,930 17 
1,038 94 


$2,290 01 


4 


Mansfield. 
Mansfield Visiting Nurse Association 


-s 


-3 


$901 59 


$1,761 23 


5 
6 

7 


Marblehead. 
Marblehead Female Humane Society 
Marblehead Visiting Nurse .\ssociation 
Young Men's Christian Association of Marble- 
head 


$15,142 57 
11.333 95 

32.062 20 


_3 


647 09 
1,169 35 

4,410 46 


502 15 
2,653 90 


8 
9 


Marlborough. 

Marlborough Hospital 

Marlborough Woman's Club 1 .... 


101,735 17 


8.000 00 


666 63 


29,385 99 


10 


Unitarian Ladies' Charitable Society 


1.200 00 


- 


251 84 


■ 


11 
12 
13 
14 


Medford. 
Lawrence Memorial Hospital of Medford . 
Medford Home for Aged Men and Women 
Medford Visiting Nurse Association . 
Sarah Fuller Home for Little Deaf Children . 


352,872 65 
39.762 43 

131.656 44 


- 


3,079 78 
1,312 38 
3,341 30 


1,048 00 

500 30 

3,152 12 


15 


Medway. 
Medway Ladies Aid Association, Inc, i 


- 


- 


- 


- 


16 
17 
18 


Melrose. 

Fitch Home. Inc., The 

Melrose High School Scholarship Inc. 

Melrose Hospital Association .... 


178,298 29 

_3 

235,989 88 


- 


25 00 
5,520 10 


200 00 
82,691 85 


19 
20 


Methuen. 

Arlington Day Nursery and Children's Tempo- 
rary Home 

Henry C. Nevins Home for the Aged and In- 
curable 


4,500 00 
866,108 70 


- 


1,460 94 


3,457 99 
6,044 04 


21 
22 
23 


MiDDLEBOROUGH. 

Fall Brook Mothers' Club, Inc 

Montgomery Home for Aged People . 
St. Luke's Hospital of Middleborough 


_3 

33,039 97 
75,304 73 


- 


17 07 
1,006 50 
8,606 14 


89 59 
9,387 90 


24 
25 
26 


MiLFORD 

Home for the Aged at Milford .... 

Milford Hospital 

Young Men's Christian Association of Milford i 


9,113 78 
308.737 61 


- 


1.640 00 


38,685~53 


27 
28 


MiLLBURY. 

Community Service Corporation of Millbury, 

Thei 

Millbury Society for District Nursing 


- 


- 


544 10 


1,715 00 


29 
30 
31 


Milton. 

Kidder House Association 

Milton Convalescent Home .... 
Milton Social Service League .... 


7,400 00 
46,694 69 

_3 


_3 


4.717 41 
5,358 75 


6.172 60 
890 67 


32 


Swift Charity 


42,425 73 


- 


- 


- 


33 


MONSON. 

Monson Home for Aged People, Inc. 


53,889 92 


_ 


2.153 21 


1.000 00 


34 


Montague. 
Farren Memorial Hospital of Montague City, 
Mass.. The 


142,948 00 


. 


14 74 


29.044 29 


35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 


Nantucket. 
Children's Aid Society of Nantucket 

Churchhaven, Nantucket, Inc 

Nantucket Cottage Hospital .... 
Old People's Home Association of Nantucket . 

Relief As.sociation, The 

Union Benevolent Society, The 
Wauwinnet Tribe No. 158 Improved Order of 
Red Men 


5,500 00 
25,000 CO 
93.283 56 

_3 

29,000 00 
10,000 00 


_3 

5,000 00 


21 00 

10.484 80 
1,778 07 
2.202 78 

- 

1.516 60 


7 11 
8.615 94 



No repHJrt. 



2 Organizations aided. 



P.D. 17, Part II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



95 



Legacies 
specifically 
restricted 
to Capital 



Unrestricted 
Legacies 



Current 
Expenditures 



Salaries 

and 

Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


$2,925 11 


5 


SI, 625 00 


1 


1,530 07 


1 


4,913 71 


3 


-4 


15 


143 85 


20 


1.C80 00 

682 37 

5,532 17 


4 
3 

9 


1,872 60 


2 


_4 


33 


2,440 35 


3 


12,394 64 


16 


_i 


9 


-4 


15 


1,460 00 


1 


70 25 
4,048 26 
3,191 60 


1 

11 
4 


1,667 55 


2 


-4 


19 


683 28 

-4 


9 


45 00 


3 


285 70 


1 



Total 


Total 


Number 


Number 


aided 


Free 



Number 

of 

Families 

aided 



$300 00 



152,230 79 



5,107 67 



$1,750 00 



11,500 00 
11,598 00 



30,000 00 



779 88 



1,083 07 
300 00 



$7,206 61 
1,023 57 



$2,359 31 

1,208 75 
1,750 67 

10,130 70 

30,894 57 
2,123 71 



591 60 

6,288 94 

926 19 

11,508 55 



8,557 00 
91,622 49 

4,925 73 
34,727 80 

52 24 
19,772 00 

47,224 74 

2.083 35 

171 13 
13,117 91 
5,975 21 

1,586 29 
3,329 14 

34,522 78 



242 25 

1,141 23 

19,249 02 

219 55 

2,560 50 

253 65 

2,586 15 



20 


- 


231 


117 


21 
104 


_3 

15 


_3 


_3 


945 


37 


122 
50 


} 50 


^L 


12 

-3 


11 


11 


13 


13 


2,051 


348 


52 


3 


87 


87 


240 


- 


1,769 


: 


265 


40 


3C5 

_3 


32 

_3 


12 

20 


\ 20 


6 


- 


1,151 


ICO 


1 
59 
143 


1 

59 
15 


28 
18 


28 
18 


17 


1 



» Not stated. 



* Not separately reported. 



96 



P.D. 17, Part II. 
Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Total 
Property 
reported 



Incum- Subscrip- 
brances on | tions, Dona- 
Real Estate! tions, etc. 



Natick. 
Leonard Morse Hospital .... 
Maria Hayes Home for Aged Persons 
Natick Visiting Nurse Association 

Xekdh.\m. 
Glover Home and Hospital. The 
King's Daughters Circle of '86, Inc.' 
Mothers' Rest Association of Newton Centre, The 
Needham Visiting Nurse Association Inc.* 

New Bedford. 
Animal Rescue League of New Bedford . 
Association for the Relief of Aged Women of 

New Bedford ...... 

Central Council of Social Agencies of New Bed 

ford. Inc. ....... 

Charity Brotherhood of the Holy Ghost of the 

North End of New Bedford, Mass., Inc.i 
Hebrew Ladies' Helping Hand Society ' . 
Henryk Dabrowski Society 
Howland Fund for Aged Women, Trustees of 

James Arnold Fund, Trustees of 

Ladies' City Mission Society in New Bedford 

New Bedford Anti-Tuberculosis Association 
New Bedford Children's Aid Society 
New Bedford Country Week Society, Inc. i 
New Bedford Day Nursery 

New Bedford Dorcas Society 

New Bedford Family Welfare Society 
New Bedford Hebrew Ladies' Aid Society 
New Bedford Home for Aged 

New Bedford Instructive Nursing Association 

New Bedford Men's Mission, Inc. 

New Bedford Port Society .... 

New Bedford Port Society, Ladies' Branch 

New Bedford Society of the Blessed Sacrament 
under the name of Vetera Romana Catholica 
Apostolica Ecclesia i .... 

New Bedford Women's Reform and Relief As- 
sociation . . . . . . 

New Bedford Young Men's Christian Association 

New Bedford Young Women's Christian Asso- 
ciation 

North End Guild of New Bedford . 

St. Luke's Hospital of New Bedford . 

St. Mary's Home of New Bedford 

Union for Good Works .... 

Winifred Goflf Homeopathic Hospital, The 

Newburyport. 

Anna Jaques Hospital .... 

Community Welfare Serviceof Newburyport, Inc 

Essex North Branch Auxiliary to the Woman's 
Board of Missions of Boston ... 

General Charitable Society of Newburyport 

Hale Fund Relief Association of the Newbury- 
port Fire Department, The^ ... 

Hebrew Ladies Aid Society of Newburyport 
The! 

Mas.sachusetts Department of the Ladies of the 
Grand .\rmy of the Republic i 

Merrimack Humane Society 

Moseley Fund for Social Service in Newburyport 
The 

Newburyport Anti-Tuberculosis Association s 

Newburyport Bethel Society 

Newburyport Female Charitable Society . 
Newburyport Homoeopathic Hospital 



J193,164 29 
83,808 26 



33,365 11 
10,900 00 



4,553 05 
351,865 84 



3.150 00 
53,253 11 

119,251 54 

91,713 17 

154,600 00 
256,824 82 

76,613 59 



12,743 89 

200 00 

58,860 59 

13,685 00 

15,000 00 

87,778 98 

68,349 44 



14,978 45 
151,000 00 

43,082 08 

18,251 76 

,185,786 70 

150,000 00 

181.561 28 

9,650 74 



619,874 03 
1,000 00 



52,736 78 



15,717 22 



110,000 00 
14,173 28 



64,642 03 



$7,500 00 



$481 00 
300 00 
206 88 


5,774 77 


2,921 05 


2,133 25 


920 50 


7,792 85 



10,279 50 


9,430 87 
14,259 58 


5,401 92 


20 00 


24,568 52 

920 12 

30 00 


18,726 50 


6,176 45 


111 00 


30 00 


845 16 


19,526 94 


36,372 07 


17,811 43 
12,935 60 
3,966 33 


3,828 45 
5,247 97 


3,083 52 
2 25 



1,533 25 
20 25 



No report. 



2 Organizations aided. 



3 Not stated. 



P.D. 17, Part II. 

Charitable Corporaiions — Continued. 



97 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 


Legacies 
specifically 
1 restricted 
to Capital 


Unrestricted 
t Legacies 

i 
1 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 
' and 
Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 

Number 

aided 


Total 

Number 

Free 


Number 

of 

Families 

aided 




$28,341 09 

3,683 51 

95 01 


- 


- 


$63,988 29 

63 88 

2,732 91 


$12,110 65 
2,137 00 


22 
2 


927 
220 


1 
43 


-3 

40 


1 

2 
3 


1,708 40 


- 


$2,000 00 


14,886 94 


6.948 92 


9 


456 


- 


- 


4 


59 37 


- 


- 


3,450 59 


1,189 09 


8 


364 


364 


- 


5 
6 

7 


204 22 


- 


- 


2,772 33 


1,341 55 


2 


_3 


_3 


_3 


8 


20,172 74 


$1,000 00 


- 


22,730 65 


- 


- 


62 


47 


- 


9 


3 10 


- 


- 


6,187 36 


5,093 87 


3 


- 


- 


- 


10 

11 
12 
13 
14 


12C 35 
2,800 33 


- 


- 


3,234 86 
2,704 90 


137 75 


- 


-3 

33 


33 


_3 


7,140 05 


- 


- 


6,687 00 


- 


- 


/ 62 

I 15 


15 


- 


15 


3,641 30 


_ 


3,000 00 


15,211 42 


9,072 98 


10 


/ 102 
1 3,770 


1,400 


- 


16 


3,116 79 
14,993 67 




- 


96,840 88 
39,160 12 


-4 

12,493 36 


33 
10 


278 
259 


5 
96 


- 


17 
18 
19 
20 


2,532 35 


5,000 00 


- 


15,681 71 


8,903 66 


14 


208 


33 


120 


1,191 51 


- 


- 


1,158 05 


- 


- 


\ 246 

35 
12 


\ 246 


24 


21 


731 24 

23 58 

2,544 25 


377 84 
1,144 72 


~ 


24,494 43 
1,049 85 
3,108 40 


11,868 38 
24 00 

849 25 


9 
4 


7 
} 2.058 


255 
32 

_3 


22 
23 
24 


781 83 


14,350 00 


1,500 00 


26,413 30 


22,463 23 


14 


f 12 

\ 4,025 


- 


25 


299 72 


- 


- 


4,870 20 


1,690 25 


3 


4C2 

f 12 

I 297 


110 
246 


- 


26 


6,347 15 


- 


- 


5,145 14 


2,225 00 


3 


13 


27 


3,614 58 


- 


- 


5,515 02 


600 00 


1 


_3 


_3 


- 


28 


472 39 


- 


- 


4,516 27 


530 67 


2 


1 32 

1 18 


} " 


_3 


29 
20 


6,957 24 


- 


500 00 


43,332 82 


23,363 06 


8 


_3 


_3 


_3 


31 


7,531 75 

1,111 08 

41,623 39 

606 95 

8,178 71 


1,101,890 00 


4,000 00 

49,707 75 
250 00 


72,689 54 

97 22 

197,584 73 

14,609 02 

9,758 84 


33,315 60 

_4 

2,136 00 
3,404 00 


31 

94 

12 
16 


7.740 
364 
43 


550 
145 

_3 


- 
_3 

40 


32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 


26,692 07 


11,529 28 


2,820 18 


81,494 77 
4,343 53 


_4 

1.837 50 


31 
2 


1.667 
466 


80 


132 


38 
39 


3,352 06 


- 


- 


3,072 57 
2,700 78 


18 25 
150 00 


_3 


-3 
-3 


_3 
-3 


-» 

_3 


40 
41 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


42 
43 


462 00 


- 


- 


501 50 


80 00 


3 


2 = 


- 


_ 


44 
45 


4,554 03 
1,206 82 


: 


- 


4,129 77 
3,223 04 


1,852 27 


1 


1.620 
134 

' t 

57 


35 
134 

} - 


-* 


46 
47 


267 02 


- 


- 


393 59 


- 


- 


_S 


48 


156 60 
3,602 89 


~ 


~ 


158 00 
6,413 32 


_4 


10 


-3 


_s 


49 
50 



« Not separately reported. 



» Report for 16^ months. 



P.D. 17, Part II. 
Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Total 
Property 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 



Subscrip- 
tions, Dona- 
tions, etc. 



Nkw-burypokt — Con. 

Newbvryport Howard Benevolent Society > 

Newburyport Society for the Relief of Aged Men 

Newburyix)rt Society for the Relief of Aged 

Women ........ 

NewburypKjrt Young Men's Christian Association 
Roman Catholic Archbishop in Boston (Chil- 
dren's Home) ....... 

Young Women's Christian Association of New- 
buryport 

Newton. 

American Board of Commissioners for Foreign 
Missions (Walker Home) ..... 

Boys' Welfare League, Inc. .... 

Governor John A. Andrew Home Association . 

Lucy Jackson Chapter, Daughters of the Ameri- 
can Revolution ...... 

New England Peabody Home for Crippled Chil- 
dren ......... 

Newton Circle, Incorporated, The . 

Newton District Nursing Association 

Newton Hospital 

Newton Welfare Bureau, Inc 

Newton Young Men's Christian Association 

Rebecca Pomroy Newton Home for Orphan Girls, 
Corporation of the 

Senoj Lodge Associates, Inc 

Stearns School Centre 

Stone Institute and Newton Home for Aged 

People 

Swedish Charitable Society of Greater Boston i . 
Twombly House, Inc., The .... 
West Newton Day Nursery, Inc., The 
Working Boys' Home 

Norfolk. 

King's Daughters' and Sons' Home for the Aged 

in Norfolk County 

North Adams. 
North Adams Hospital 

Young Men's Christian Association of North 
Adams ^ 

North Andover. 
Charlotte Home, The 

North Attleborough. 
North Attle borough District Nursing Association 

Northampton. 
Children's Aid Association of Hampshire County 

Clarke School for the Deaf .... 

Cooley Dickinson Hospital, Thei 

Lathrop Home for Aged and Invalid Women in 
Northampton 

Smith Students' Aid Society. Incorporated 

Students' Associated Housekeepers . 

Wright Home for Young Women, The 

Young Men's Christian Association of North- 
ampton 

Northbridqe. 
George Marston Whitin Gymnasium Inc. . 
Whitinsville Hospital, Inc., The 

Northfield. 
Northfield Seminary Students' Aid Society 

Norton. 
Barrowsville Community Service Corporation . 



$101,095 95 


203,428 00 
75,560 71 


15,000 00 


30,000 00 


164,625 00 


9,681 98 


5,000 00 


1,476,570 77 
100 00 


633,206 76 

1.680 00 

193,224 00 

_3 


2,5C0 00 


270,029 63 


9,264 05 
110,000 00 


59,1C0 17 


90,000 00 


59,097 60 


150 00 


19,756 00 


437,990 00 


222,250 00 
43,765 00 


261,829 54 


76,575 00 


107,664 04 
43,000 CO 


_3 


_3 



$7,800 00 
1,300 00 



15,000 00 



31,600 00 



$10 00 



332 00 
4,389 20 



735 00 
732 57 



1,369 61 

2,831 92 

1,290 28 

3,800 00 
2.647 55 
3.552 41 

33,381 68 
8,073 43 

23,614 67 

4,048 00 
1,306 30 

2,856 27 

11,404 25 

156 00 

4,366 18 

34,362 92 



7,153 93 
11,567 40" 



2,093 32 



10,439 21 
63,583 47 



354 95 
2,530 21 



10.076 



109.000 00 
8.257 69 



632 50 



No report. 



2 Organizations aided. 



P.D. 17, Part II. 
Charitable Corporations 



Continued. 



99 



Legacies 
specifically 
restricted 
to Capital 



Unrestricted 
Legacies 



Current 
Expenditures 



Salaries 

and 

Wages 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 
Era- ■ 
ployees 



Total 

Number 

aided 



Total 

Number 

Free 



Number 

of 

Families 

aided 



$8,474 28 



37,795 96 
3,829 10 



$1,013 78 



11,000 00 



8,065 50 

5,506 05 1,200 00 

75 00 



1,046 88 



10,000 00 



7,000 00 



$7,170 63 



10,111 65 
13,387 58 



7,448 52 
15,397 07 



13,637 77 

8,698 78 

1,473 55 

52,807 01 

1,008 00 

6,603 03 

200,800 10 

12,600 34 

54,425 66 

6,066 54 
2,966 87 

3,767 88 

16,537 75 

943 78 

5,000 19 

56,425 34 



9,436 27 
69,143 44 



713 11 
2,510 60 



16,046 86 
134,568 06 



11,223 77 
9,880 63 

11,275 00 
7,117 33 

16,817 85 



18,929 75 
4.140 10 



$2,124 09 



3,717 16 
5,861 43 



600 CO 
5,624 41 



4,146 25 
2,709 00 



24,298 00 
1,008 00 
5,272 50 
6,600 00 
4,954 81 

12,974 26 

2,254 75 
245 25 

2,313 71 



6,267 98 

750 00 
2,695 17 
5,019 00 



2,855 



1,753 22 



6,139 94 
61,631 01 

4,867 00 

123 94 

2,540 00 

2,644 00 

7,424 57 









17 




10 


72 
800 




72 


80 




6 


421 




1 


19 




- 


142 




- 


101 

100 

940 

3,815 




62 

90 

94 

624 


1,900 




600 


22 

187 

22 

600 




19 
18 

_3 


26 




25 


_3 




_3 


532 
197 




409 
21 


_3 




_3 


1,451 




45 


125 




21 


301 




141 


412 

164 
162 




61 


31 
47 
18 
10 

52 

826 




10 
175 


564 




- 


33 




_j 


- 




- 



» Not stated. 



* Not separately reported. 



100 



P.D. 17, Part II. 
Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Total 
I*roperty 
reported 



Incum- I Subscrip)- 
brances on | tions, Dona- 
Real Estate' tions, etc. 



X OK WOOD. 

Norwood Civic Association 

Norwood Hospital 

Norwood Lithuanian Socialist Association 

Oak Bujffs. 
Martha's Vineyard Hospital, Inc. 



Orange. 
5 Orange Visiting Nurse A^ocidtion, Inc., The 



Oxford. 
Oxford Home for Aged People . . . , 

Palmer. 

Wing Memorial Hospital Association . 

Peabody. 
CharlesB.HavenHome for Aged Menin Peabody 
Female Benevolent Society at South Danvers 
Isaac Munroe Home for Orphan and Needy 

Children 

Peabody Community House, Inc., The 
Peabody Finnish Workingmen's Association 
Peabody Hebrew Ladies' Aid Association 
Peabody Visiting Nurse Association . 
"Soldiers and Sailors Association of Peabody' 

Veterans of the World War, Inc. ' 
Sutton Home for Aged Women in Peabody 



Pepperell. 
Pepperell Men's Club . 



Petersh.vm. 
IS Petersham Exchange, The 1 



Pittsfield. 

Associated Charities of Pittsfield . 

Berkshire Benevolent Association for the Blind 
Inc., The 

Berkshire Branch of Woman's Board of Missions 
in Boston 

Berkshire County Home for Aged Women . 

Berkshire County Society for the Care of Crip- 
pled and Deformed Children, The . 

Boylan Memorial Hospital of Pittsfield, Mass 
Inc., The ....... 

Boys' Club of Pittsfield .... 

Epv.orth Mission of Pittsfield 

Hillcrest Surgical Hospital 

House of Mercy 

Pittsfield Anti-Tuberculosis Association i . 



Pittsfield Day Nursery Association ^ . 

Visiting Nurse Association of Pittsfield 
Working Girls' Club of Pittsfield 

Plymouth. 
Boys' Club of Plymouth . 
Jordan Hospital, The^ 



Long Pond Ladies Aid Society .... 

Plymouth Community Nurse Association, In- 
corporated 

Plymouth Fragment Society .... 

Ryder Home for Old People, Corporation of . 
Sunnyside, Inc 

Prinxeton. 
Girls' Vacation House Association 

Provixcetown. 
Provincetown Helping Hand Society 



$95,000 00 
63,471 37 
12,000 00 



19,90C 00 



40,948 13 

16,783 75 

71,800 10 
24,690 03 

19,814 07 
14,626 00 
6,500 00 

1,508 52 
76,326 49 



27,640 24 



269,111 10 
320,361 79 

75,000 00 

287,412 00 

9,000 00 

42,000 00 
596,088 51 



10,457 78 
1.600 00 

1,550 00 
1,500 00 

35.537 38 

31,726 88 
2,500 00 

38,738 35 
54,962 50 



$4,475 00 



2,000 00 



4,800 00 
4,200 00 



11,000 00 
7,000 00 



$461 00 

12,584 57 

88 00 



6,118 34 

1.291 15 

14 00 

7,056 26 



5 00 
575 54 



1,407 95 



424 90 
988 00 



502 42 



7,886 44 

710 52 

10,551 78 
3,012 50 

21,312 73 

169 17 
5,891 50 

821 47 

8,381 04 

20,859 46 

5,726 43 

9,681 99 
1,250 40 



1,396 87 

61 00 

459 00 

59 00 

703 76 
2,965 39 

1,296 64 



No report. 



2 Organizations aided. 



» Not stated. 



P.D. 17, Part II. 
Charitable Corporations 



101 



Continued. 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 


Legacies 
specifically 
1 restricted 
1 to Capital 


Unrestricted 
Legacies 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 

Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 

Number 

aided 


Total 

Number 

Free 


Numbei 

of 

Families 

aided 




$6,036 00 

1.446 02 

505 00 


- 


- 


$15,022 09 

39.393 26 

986 17 


$7,763 39 

_4 


10 
21 


1,600 
1.514 


37 


- 


1 
2 
3 


380 01 


$3,000 00 


- 


13,428 12 


_4 


7 


132 


3 


- 


4 


- 


- 


- 


1,398 69 


1,314 00 


1 


290 


12 


- 


5 


2,264 68 


- 


- 


477 99 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6 


289 59 


8.783 75 


- 


16,406 18 


- 


8 


485 


- 


- 


7 


1,762 62 
1,114 23 


2,230 00 


- 


1,806 01 
1,705 00 


322 50 
50 00 


1 


5 
20 


5 
20 


20 


8 
9 


1,029 31 
8 09 

1.3 55 

8 38 


- 


- 


817 66 
2,871 44 
1.769 73 

712 51 
2,700 44 


25 00 

1,374 00 

180 00 

1,788 53 


3 

1 

1 


_3 

6 
373 


_3 

95 


5 


10 
11 
12 
13 
14 


4.323 44 


2,000 00 


- 


4,143 76 


1,329 55 


3 


9 


7 


- 


15 
16 


- 


- 


- 


386 41 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


17 

10 


913 05 


[ 


'_ 


8,096 26 


2,450 00 


2 


; 


[ 


317 


19 

19 


- 


- 


- 


296 38 




- 


18 


18 


- 


20 


50 00 
12,913 31 


- 


$1,000 00 


672 85 
15,233 31 


5,389 50 


7 


25 


25 


_3 


21 
22 


29,776 42 


- 


- 


51.099 52 


15,425 68 


12 


41 


41 


_3 


23 


11,122 02 

365 00 
18,953 74 


- 


2,000 00 
500 00 


39,621 22 

18,694 66 

898 50 

49,664 78 

132,287 92 


_4 

10,868 37 
60 00 

_4 
-4 


21 
21 
1 
17 
64 


1,279 
1,498 

-3 

2,350 
3.875 


44 
1.466 

25 
249 


- 


24 

25 
26 
27 
28 
29 


142 50 


500 00 


_ 


5,203 15 


1.356 50 


3 


{ i' 

1.207 
32 


) ^ 

230 


- 


30 


804 20 


~ 


- 


13,314 56 
2,509 94 


10,396 02 
418 50 


8 
5 


~ 


31 
32 


59 07 


1,050 00 


_ 


2,779 99 


1.946 50 


2 


339 


18 


_ 


33 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


34 


- 


- 


- 


319 07 


- 


- 


{ r 


} 1 


- 


35 


- 


- 


- 


1,799 00 


1.562 50 


1 


139 


13 


- 


36 


1,761 93 


5,122 88 


- 


1,938 48 


- 


- 


f V 
\ 22 
8 
23 


-J 

_3 

23 


16 


37 


1,249 65 


- 


2,100 00 


2,457 28 
2,965 39 


1,251 65 
1,258 00 


1 
3 


-3 


38 
39 


1,183 99 


- 


- 


4,005 89 


1,245 00 


9 


175 


5 


- 


40 


2.499 70 


- 


- 


2,590 40 


- 


"1 


{ af 


63 


30 


41 



* Not separately reported. 



* Report for 15 months. 



102 



P.D. 17, Part II. 
Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Total 
Property 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 



Subscrip- 
tions, Dona- 
tions, etc. 



QUINCT. 

City Hospital of Quincy .... 

Family Welfare Society of Quincy, Mass., The 

National Sailors' Home 

Quincy Charitable Society . 

Quincy Day Nursery Association 

Quincy Women's Club 

Sailors' Snug Harbor of Boston . 

Wollaston Woman's Club 

Young Men's Christian Association of Quincy 

R.'V.NDOLPH. 

Boston School for the Deaf .... 

Seth Mann 2d Home for Aged and Infirm Women 

Reading. 
Reading Home for Aged Women 
Reading Visiting Nurse Association . 
Victory House Associates, Inc 

Revere. 

Beachmont Catholic Club 

Hebrew Ladies' Charitable Association of Revere ' 
Home for Aged People in Revere 

Ingleside Corporation 

Revere Visiting Nurse Association, Inc. 

ROCK^.VXD. 

French Home for Aged Women .... 

RtJTL.^ND. 

Central New England Sanatorium, Inc. . 
Rutland Entertainment Association, Inc.i 
Rutland Masonic Charitable and Educational 
Association 

Salem. 

Associated Charities of Salem, Mass. 

Association for the Relief of Aged and Destitute 
Women in Salem 

Bertram Home for Aged Men 

Children's Island Sanitarium, The 

City Orphan Asylum 

Gemilath Chesed of Salem, Inc. i 

House of Seven Gables Settlement Association 
Thei 

Independent Polish Socialist Society Inc. Salem 
Branch 

Lydia E. Pinkham Memorial, Incorporated, The 

Mack Industrial School 

Marine Society at Salem in New England . 

North Shore Babies' Hospital, The . . 

Plummer Farm School of Reform for Boys, The 

Salem Animal Rescue League 

Salem Association for the Prevention of Tuber- 
culosis ...... 

Salem Charitable Mechanic Association 

Salem East India Marine Society 

Salem Female Charitable Society 

Salem Fraternity .... 

Salem Hebrew Ladies' Aid Society . 

Salem Hospital 

Salem Relief Committee (Inc.) . 

Salem Seamen's Orphan and Children's Friend 
Society 1 

Salem War Chest Association 

Salem Young Men's Christian Association 

Salem Young Women's Association 

Samaritan Society, The 

Sarah E. Sherman Memorial Association i 

Seamen's Widow and Orphan Association 

Woman's Friend Society 

Satjgus. 
Women's Civic League of Cliftondale, Inc., The 



$102,311 38 

269,635 64 
13,180 00 

12.500 00 

310,769 61 

3.900 00 

51,500 00 



266.000 00 
179.134 87 



25,237 11 



3,000 00 

8,939 27 
98,116 06 



12,000 00 

174,592 79 

2,5C0 00 

32.827 05 

420.613 43 

223.423 24 

77,131 20 

34,600 00 

4.000 00 

70.215 23 
54.000 00 
67.575 39 
160.926 01 

3.550 00 

30,427 00 
35.159 26 
157,925 76 

1,207,564 43 
6,922 25 



80.391 00 

8.000 00 

56.495 57 

74.775 30 
50.860 51 



$19,000 00 



1,300 00 



10.000 00 
750 00 



7,612 44 



.000 00 



9,000 00 
3,920 00 



$2,346 90 

50 58 
340 00 
432 51 

2.322 03 
17,736 98 



14,4C0 00 



1,886 49 
1,056 25 
1,344 00 



714 45 



3.388 34 
1.016 06 



3.750 00 

12,512 00 

550 00 

6,459 99 
570 00 

12,878 02 



164 77 

1,629 45 

7,212 35 

344 00 

4.789 71 



117 00 
599 60 
513 50 
5.710 00 
652 05 



4.591 38 

3.662 11 

215 50 



3.677 01 



1 No report. 



Organizations aided. 



P.D. 17, Part II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



103 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 


Legacies 
specifically 
restricted 
to Capital 


Unrestricted 
Legacies 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 

Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 

Number 

aided 


Total 

Number 

Free 


Number 

of 

Families 

aided 




$5,778 22 


$500 00 




$611 85 


$400 OC 










1 


12 04 


- 


- 


2.642 24 


2,106 00 


2 


-3 


-3 


274 


2 


12,463 11 


- 


- 


13.421 02 


1,500 00 


5 


15 


13 


- 


3 


458 56 


- 


- 


475 25 


- 


- 


12 


- 


29 


4 


566 02 


- 


$1,163 55 


2,526 48 


453 82 


2 


2,835 


945 


_3 


5 




- 




9.910 74 


5,166 78 


6 


9,557 


1,884 


-» 6 


14.848 35 


- 


- 


12.283 18 


3,291 41 


5 


22 


22 


- 


7 


60 22 


- 


- 


2,655 19 






272 




_3 


8 


665 00 


- 


- 


37,925 52 


11,805 38 


7 


3,000 


. 750 


-8 


9 


2,015 63 






50,217 43 


24,506 39 


40 


176 


_ 


. 


10 


9,393 98 


5,000 00 


- 


4,931 51 


2,065 16 


2 


6 


6 


- 


11 


1,197 67 


_ 


_ 


3,795 45 


1,726 63 


3 


9 


-3 


_ 


12 


- 


- 


- 


2,552 97 


1,530 07 


1 


275 


82 


_S 


13 


- 


- 


- 


1,324 47 


- 


- 


12 


- 


- 


14 


19 24 


- 


- 


3,078 28 


- 


- 


- 


- 


-3 


15 
16 
17 


277 86 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2,016 00 


- 


- 


10,C83 35 


4,244 47 


6 


31 


2 


_3 


18 


15 22 


- 


- 


3,108 70 


2,456 74 


2 


3,393 


130 


20 


19 


212 50 


1,000 00 


- 


3,442 56 


800 00 


1 


- 


- 


-8 


20 


3,700 08 


- 


- 


55,654 21 


-4 


11 


25 


- 


- 


21 
22 


168 00 


- 


- 


436 21 


35 00 


1 


- 


- 


- 


23 


1,544 06 


2,000 00 


- 


7,758 12 


4,189 92 


4 


310 


-3 


_3 


24 


17,247 44 


6.400 09 


_ 


22,997 22 


7,561 22 


12 


44 


43 


- 


25 


11,759 71 


- 


_ 


7.701 97 


2.739 67 


5 


18 


18 


- 


26 


4,824 65 


_ 


_ 


15,806 13 


-4 


23 


118 


118 


- 


27 


760 51 


= 


: 


342 56 


- 






- 


- 


28 
29 


133 00 


_ 


_ 


612 76 


21 68 


_ 


24 


24 


4 


30 
31 


2,872 98 


1,000 00 


I 


7.763 75 


5.681 76 


6 


_ 


_ 


_ 


6i 
33 


9,796 31 


- 


_ 


10.045 72 


1,200 00 


- 


19 


- 


- 


34 


2.738 63 


_ 


- 


8.313 07 


-4 


10 


74 


33 


- 


35 


7,687 00 


- 


- 


12.593 06 


4,752 19 


7 


42 


24 


- 


36 


13 81 


- 


- 


1.097 59 


_4 


1 


1.231 


463 


- 


37 


118 18 


_ 


1,000 00 


5.350 97 


3,064 31 


5 


232 


232 


15 


38 


136 40 


_ 




777 50 


75 00 


2 


- 


- 


- 


39 


1,526 00 


_ 


_ 


1.208 00 


300 00 




- 


- 


- 


40 


1,623 33 


- 


2,000 00 


1.778 92 


5 GO 


- 


70 


70 


- 


41 


6,048 04 


_ 


_ 


7.364 29 


4,766 44 


13 


4,000 


-■ 


- 


42 


- 


_ 


_ 


1.028 22 


_ 




16 


-3 


10 


43 


34.568 28 


_ 


_ 


147.459 20 


-4 


61 


3,513 


476 


- 


44 


314 OC 


- 


5,914 28 


2,553 99 


980 00 


1 


400 


356 


65 


45 


639 77 


~_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


46 

47 


16.489 72 


- 


- 


32.495 76 


13,012 50 


9 


6,150 


5,000 


- 


48 


1.647 05 


- 


3,687 50 


3.814 64 


1,792 25 


3 


- 


- 


- 


49 


•2,142 29 


- 




2,370 64 


- 


- 


109 


109 


50 


50 


4.144 65 


2,000 00 


_ 


4,177 84 


300 00 


_ 


35 


35 


- 


01 

52 


1,817 06 


- 


1,000 00 


14,440 90 


6,558 55 


7 


841 


733 


_s 


53 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


54 



3 Not stated. 



* Not separately reported. 



104 



P.D. 17, Part IT. 
Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Total 
Property 
reported 



Incum- 
brances on 
Real Estate 



Subscrip- 
tions, Dona- 
tions, etc. 



SCITUATK. 

Children's Sunlight Repair Shop, Inc. 
Lydia Collett Corporation, The 
Phil Sheridan Camp Association 

Sharon. 
Boston Lakeshore Home 



Sharon Playground and Recreation Association 
Sharon Sanatorium 



Sherborn. 
Sherborn Widows' and Orphans' Benevolent 
Society 

Shirley. 
Altrurian Club of Shirley 



SOMERVILLE. 

Associated Charities of Somervillei . 
Hutchinson Home Corporation for Aged Women 
Institution of the Little Sisters of the Poor 
Somerville Home for the Aged . 
Somerville Hospital ..... 
Somerville Hospital Ladies' Aid Association ^ 
Somerville Young Men's Christian .Association 
Visiting Nur.sing Association of Somerville 
Washington Street Day Nursery of Somerville 

SotJTHBRIDGE. 

Young Men's Christian Association of South- 
bridge 

Spencer. 
Spencer Good Samaritan and District Nurse 
• Association 

Springfield. 
-American International College . 
Baby Feedina: Association of Springfield . 
Community Welfare Association of Springfield 

Massachu.setts 

Daughters of Zion Old People's Home 

Good Shepherd A.ssociation of Springfield, The 

Good Will, Inc., The 

Hampden County Children's Aid Association 
Hampden County Tuberculosis and Public 

Health Association ..... 
Horace Smith Fund, The .... 
James W. Hale Fund, Trustees of 

Mercy Hospital 

Particular Council of the Society of St. Vincent 

de Paul of Springfield, Mass., The. . 
St. John's Institutional Activities 
St. Mark's Community House, Inc. . 
Service League Foundation, Inc. ^ 

Springfield Boys' Club .... 

Springfield Day Nursery Corporation 
Springfield Girls' Club .... 
Springfield Home for Aged Men 
Springfield Home for Aged Women 
Springfield Home for Friendless Women and 

Children 

Springfield Hospital, The .... 
Springfield Rescue Mission, The 
Springfield Visiting Nurse Association, The' 
Springfield Young Men's Christian Association 
Springfield Young Women's Christian A&socia 

tion ........ 

Union Relief Association ' . 
Wesson Maternity Hospital 
Wesson Memorial Hospital .... 



Stockbridge. 

49 Austen Riggs Foundation Inc. . 

50 Stockbridge Vacation House Inc., The 



$9,000 00 
6.000 00 

45,50C 00 
202,279 51 

6,638 49 
2,874 20 



48,981 03 
64,000 00 
160,332 98 
99,815 54 

103,604 81 

2,000 00 



80,000 00 



20,650 00 



203,316 68 



12,000 00 

123,400 00 

12,070 00 

71,125 00 

11,000 00 
246,269 70 

34.400 00 
278,408 93 



35,100 CO 
12,000 00 



100,000 00 

143,993 77 

45,000 00 

198,453 33 

363,634 45 

275,084 71 

1,092,693 65 

78,300 00 



225,589 25 



347,700 00 
500,000 00 



118,567 63 
30,000 00 



$6,000 00 
3,500 00 

5,000 00 



25,000 00 



27,000 CO 



39,500 00 



,000 00 



5,000 00 
7,0C0 00 



18,000 00 



2,000 00 



4,500 00 



37,500 00 



16,552 43 
2,955 20 



3,673 66 
17,131 02 



15,459 11 

615 91 

8,985 00 

1,262 50 

880 20 

58 00 



,125 39 



310 70 



5,326 10 



263,294 60 
2,562 00 
12,076 76 
8.546 00 
6,758 00 

20,798 22 



5.198 50 

11,289 00 
10,553 00 
2,000 00 

17,485 64 

8,450 00 
9,563 75 

6,705 00 

6,935 00 
19,992 42 
6,083 55 



20,165 00 

68 28 



20.002 87 
4,536 21 



1 No report. 



2 Organizations aided. 



P.D.17, Part II. 
Charitable Corporations 



Continued. 



105 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 


Legacies 
specifically 
restricted 
to Capital 


Unrestrictec 
Legacies 


1 

Current 
Expenditures 

i 


Salaries 

and 

Wages 


j Average 
1 Numbei 
i of Paid 
Em- 
ployees 


Total 

Number 

aided 


Total 

Number 

Free 


1 Number 

i of 
, Families 
aided 




$9 21 


_ 


- 


$5,492 99 

1,848 50 


-4 

$110 00 


10 
1 


83 

22 

155 


83 
18 


-J 

-3 


1 

2 
3 


714 11 


$5,000 00 


- 


9,579 42 


3,602 97 


4 


f 6 = 
1 310 


1 162 


_3 


4 


4,826 20 


- 


- 


49,093 27 


-4 


26 


ICl 


- 


- 


5 
6 


581 29 


- 


- 


619 20 


- 


- 


15 


_3 


- 


7 


127 08 


- 


- 


102 36 


- 


- 


62 


- 


- 


8 


3,037 25 

7,191 76 
1,873 30 


250 00 


$10,124 70 
4,300 00 


3,739 40 
19,262 00 

8,429 55 
76,241 12 


3,288 60 

-4 


5 

24 


9 

265 

24 

2.296 


-3 

265 

-3 

254 


-3 


9 
10 
11 

12 
13 

1 A 


119 95 
210 18 


- 


- 


14,000 52 

5,630 89 

135 95 


6,344 44 
5,031 35 


3 
4 


2.897 
10.174 

22 


1,767 
2,896 


8 


14 

15 
16 
17 


9,877 01 


- 


- 


18,148 44 


5,226 13 


5 


420 


170 


- 


18 


852 34 


- 


300 00 


1,681 84 


1,320 00 


2 


257 


117 


- 


19 


7,164 17 


6,220 62 


3,244 96 


80,633 40 


36,056 83 


15 


_3 


_3 


-3 


20 
21 


1,091 92 

311 92 

• 74 06 

3,834 89 




3,797 00 
5,000 00 


258,228 76 
2,229 00 

62,517 68 
8,946 36 

14,169 90 


9,626 08 
1,035 00 
6,253 88 
3,262- 46 
4,273 17 


5 
1 
4 
3 
3 


252 
5 
284 

37 
120 


5 

275 
8 
63 


_3 

104 


22 
23 
24 
25 
26 


13,387 94 
1,855 47 
2,647 15 


- 


- 


21.184 25 

13,645 71 

785 57 

125,312 74 


9,203 42 
425 00 

-4 


5 

1 

61 


5.211 

60 

340 

4.972 


5,211 

340 
156 


55 


27 
28 
29 
30 


5,782 92 
1,869 25 

8 90 

3,516 55 

13 22 

9,546 64 

15,471 14 


• _ 
15,000 00 


- 


11,361 00 
19,589 04 
3,905 02 

21,857 93 

13,952 29 

10,105 33 

5,667 72 

25,654 35 


4,493 40 
1,578 19 

10.040 15 

6.937 50 
4.780 02 
1.952 54 
8.556 76 


5 

_3 

10 

_J 
10 

2 
10 


466 
1.012 
1,250 

{ I.8O0] 

60C 

9 

69 


-3 

557 

-3 

} : 

9 

58 


102 

-3 
-3 

_3 
_3 


31 
32 
33 
34 

35 

36 
37 
38 
39 


12,360 07 

29,586 89 

39 38 


- 


6,818 02 


23,294 03 

258,736 28 

13,981 56 


9.189 95 
8.696 15 


22 
105 

7 


291 

4.391 

28,705 


178 

270 

2,602 


_3 


40 
41 
42 
43 
44 


4,008 05 

13,685 54 
12,666 51 


- 


10,000 00 


82,492 41 

72.097 49 
84.731 02 


36.882 73 

-4 


41 

40 
45 


129,622 

911 
2,206 


2 
112 


_3 


45 
46 

47 
48 


344 51 


- 


- 


84.473 78 
4,774 92 


' _4 

2.572 25 


7 
6 


_3] 

74 1 


_8 

74 


- 


49 
50 



Not stated. 



< Not separately repKirted. 



106 



P.D. 17, Part II. 
Abstracts of Reports of Private 







Total 


Incum- 


Subscrif)- 


Earnings 






Property 


brances on 


tions. Dona- 


and 






reported 


Real Estate 


tions, etc. 


Refunds 




tSTON'EHAM. 










1 


Home for Aged People in Stoneham . 


$32,329 76 


- 


$40 00 


- 


2 


Stoneham Visiting Nurse Association 
Stow. 


" 




1,486 62 


$769 25 


3 


Red Acre Farm, Incorporated .... 
Sutton. 


59,457 95 


- 


4,358 00 


6,579 00 


4 


Wilkinsonville Community Association . 

SWAMPSCOTT. 


1,200 00 




46 25 




5 


Florence Crittenton Rescue League . 
Swansea. 


10,000 00 


$2,000 00 


2,870 55 


5,190 85 


6 


Rest House, Inc. 

Taunton. 


94,286 88 


" 




6,184 50 


7 


Bethlehem Home 


11,000 00 


- 


14,306 43 


1,127 20 


8 


Hebrew Ladies' Helping Hand Society of 












Taunton 


_ 


_ 


374 47 


- 


9 


Morton Hospital 


312,691 47 


_ 


18,266 15 


45,121 00 


10 


Social Welfare I>eague, Inc. of Taunton 


-3 


- 


3,045 56 


4 00 


11 


Taunton Boys' Club Association of Taunton . 


40,000 00 


- 


5,924 61 


- 


12 


Taunton Female Charitable Association . 


84,832 42 


- 


1,720 23 


2,866 86 


13 


Young Men's Clu-istian Association of Taunton i 
Templeton. 


" 


" 


" 




14 


Hospital Cottages for Children, The . 

UXBRIDGE. 


525,179 19 


" 


4,179 46 


34,569 20 


15 


Uxbridge Samaritan Society .... 
Wakefield. 


5,000 00 








16 


Elizabeth E. Boit Home for Aged Women 


20,000 00 


- 


2,156 41 


300 00 


17 


W'akefield Hebrew Ladies' Charitable Society . 


- 


- 


82 85 


- 


18 


Wakefield Visiting Nurse Association 
Walpole. 


5,086 05 


~ 


2,082 92 


561 35 


19 


Walpole Visiting Nurse Association . 
Waltham. 


~ 


' 


1,867 25 


739 61 


20 


Fellowship House Inc. i 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


21 


Leland Home for Aged Women i 




- 


- 


- 


- 


22 


Mt. Prospect School, The . 




- 99,310 93 


_ 


36,135 66 


- 


23 


Waltham Animal Aid Society 






_ 


349 81 


461 21 


24 


Waltham Baby Hospital, The . 




47,455 11 


- 


1,721 92 


1,563 87 


25 


Waltham Day Nursery Association i . 




- 


- 


- 


- 


26 


Waltham District Nursing Association 




4,050 00 


- 


1,959 16 


1,325 05 


27 


Waltham Graduate Niu-se Association 






- 


447 94 


- 


28 


Waltham Hospital .... 




420,752 44 


25,000 00 


9,972 69 


87,023 53 


29 


Waltham Social Service League . 




_ 


- 


3,015 13 


- 


30 


Young Men's Hebrew Association of Waltham i 


- 


- 


- 


~ 


31 


Ware. 
Ware Visiting Nurse and Hospital Association . 

Watertown. 


527,914 34 


- 


4,402 1« 


8,578 87 


32 


Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School 












for the Blind 


1,507.862 46 


- 


3,387 50 


75,293 94 


33 


Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for 












the Blind (Kindergarten for the Blind) . 


1,991,968 48 


- 


15 50 


46,516 00 


34 


Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for 












the Blind (Howe Memorial Press Fund) . 


169,915 20 


- 


- 


7,757 79 


35 


Sunny Bank Home 1 


_ 


— 


— 


— 


36 


Watertown Associated Charities 


-3 


_3 


78 00 


- 


37 


Watertown District Nunsing Association . 


1,606 11 


- 


2,140 15 


2,089 60 


38 


W^atertown Home for Old Folks 

W^EBSTER. 


58,369 85 




372 33 


305 25 


39 


Club Gagnon, Inc 


17,000 00 


11,200 00 


642 43 


- 


40 


Forestiers Franco-Americains .... 


4,000 00 


" 


" 





1 No report. 



Organizations aided. 



P.D. 17, Part II. 

Charitable Corporations 



Continued. 



107 



Interest, 

Dividends, 

Annuities 

and Rentals 


Legacies 
specifically 
restricted 
to Capital 


Unrestricted 
Legacies 


Current 
Expenditures 


Salaries 

and 

Wages 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 


Total 

Number 

aided 


Total 

Number 

Free 


Number 

of 

Families 

aided 




$1,445 89 


















] 


46 37 


- 


- 


$2,559 85 


$1,714 68 


1 


f 22 

1 828 


} 7^ 


7 


i 


2,424 02 


$2,000 00 


$3,582 54 


9,592 69 


4,518 93 


4 


99 


58 


_3 


A 


- 


- 


- 


7,676 15 


1,155 20 


4 


f 82 
1 127 


} = 


- 


fi 


4,307 47 


- 


- 


10,557 67 


4,318 56 


5 


-' 


-3 


_3 


e 


38 23 


- 


1,600 00 


16,184 42 


3,222 00 


10 


88 


73 


- 




5,000 43 
24 00 

3,014 75 


5,000 00 
100 00 


250 00 


356 58 

69,885 24 

3,307 63 

8,918 39 

5,968 84 


-4 

2,228 75 
6,292 27 
2,309 58 


30 
2 
7 
3 


5 
1,854 

565 
14 


-3 

47 
14 


2 
161 


g 

ic 
11 
11 

13 


20,655 26 


- 


- 


61,764 55 


28,521 64 


44 


139 


18 


- 


14 


- 


- 


- 


2,395 06 


1,550 00 


2 


206 


_3 


194 


IS 


1,579 90 


- 


- 


3,280 36 
51 80 


1,357 10 


3 


12 
32 


11 

- 


- 
2 


le 

17 


348 63 


- 


- 


2,381 42 


1,675 70 


1 


/ 1^ 
\ 286 


} " 


80 


1? 


6 38 


- 


- 


2,533 83 


1,630 00 


1 


330 


_3 


_3 


1£ 


' 4,880 92 

40 01 

2,254 91 


- 


5,550 00 


11,585 99 

546 50 

5,999 28 


437 50 

_4 


4 


672 
934 


672 
24 


- 


2C 
21 
22 
23 
24 


155 10 

11,633 12 

1 28 


10,650 00 


- 


2,924 07 

437 94 

119,601 03 

2,999 78 


1,200 00 

34,887 86 
1,640 00 


1 

52 
2 


556 
2,571 

_3 


275 
170 

_3 


_3 


2f 
27 
2S 
2S 
30 


865 30 


48,978 76 


29,969 46 


19,118 10 


_4 


10 


448 


13 


- 


31 


48,260 16 


83,121 90 


- 


130,060 54 


63,946 98 




f 182 


15 


- 


32 


77,675 80 


30,647 76 


_ 


119,783 01 


48,460 56 


177 


127 


- 


- 


33 


11,046 84 


7,100 00 




18,062 52 


7,877 90 




- 


- 


- 


34 

OK 


17 14 
3,282 53 


- 


~ 


166 79 
3,958 68 
3,594 41 


3,682 59 
1,055 47 


3 
3 


65 

803 

5 


-3 

67 
5 


7 

-3 


oa 
36 
37 
38 


2,922 50 
1 00 


- 


- 


3,752 86 
1 00 


297 73 


1 


- 


- 


-3 


39 
40 



3 Not stated. 



< Not separately reported. 



108 



P.D. 17, Part II. 
Abstracts of Reports of Private 



Total 
Property 
reported 



Incum- I Subscrip- ! Earnings 
brances on tions, Dona-l and 
Real Estate tions, etc. Refunds 



Weixesley. 
Convalescent Home of the Children's Hospital, 
The 



Wellesley Friendly Aid Association 
Wellesley Students' Aid Society, Inc., The 



Westborough. 

4 I Kirkside. Inc., The .... 

5 , Westborough District Nurse Association 



Westfield. 
Noble Hospital. Trustees of 1 . . . . 
Sarah Gillett Home for Aged People, The 
Shurtleff Mission to the Children of the Destitute, 

The 

Young Men's Christian Association of Westfield 



Westford. 

10 Ladies' Sewing Society & Women's Branch Al- 
liance of the Unitarian Church 

Weymouth. 

11 Weymouth Hospital* 

12 j Wej-mouth Visiting Nurse Association, Inc. 



] WHITM.\.>r. 

13 ' Rogers Home for Aged Women . 

I WlXCHEXDO.V. 

Winchendon Home for Aged People ' 



Winchester. 
Home for Aged People in Winchester 
Winchester Visiting Nurse .Association 

WlXTHROP. 

Tifareth Israel Congregation of Winthrop . 
Winthrop Community Hospital 
Winthrop Visiting Nurse Association, Incor- 
porated . . 

Winthrop Young Men's Hebrew Association, Inc.' 

WOBtTRX. 

Home for Aged Women in Woburn . 

Winning Home 

Woburn Charitable Association . . . . 
Young Men's Christian Association of Woburn ' 

W^ORCESTER. 

Animal Rescue League of Worcester . 
Associated Charities of Worcester 
Association of Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy 
Bikor Cholim Society 1 .... 

Board of the Swedish Lutheran Old People's 
Home of Worcester, Mass. .... 

Fairlawn Hosoital, Inc 

Girls' League for Ser\'ice, Inc. ... 

Girls' Welfare Society of Worcester, Inc. . 

Guild of St. Agnes of Worcester 

Home Association for Aged Colored People 

Home for Aged Men in Worcester 

Home for Aged Women in the City of Worcester 

Trustees of 

Italian American War Veterans Association, Inc. 
Jewish Home for Aged and Orphans of Worcester 

Mass. Inc. ..... 

Little Franciscan Sisters of Mary 
Memorial Home for the Blind, The . 
Memorial Hospital .... 

North Worcester Aid Society 
Odd Fellows' Home of Massachusetts 
Quinsigamond Finnish Workingmen's Assn 
Relief Organization for Lithuania i . 
Rest Home Association 



Inc 



$372,821 06 

200 00 

27,960 00 

146,000 00 



43,766 38 



98,772 88 
30,000 OC 



15,000 00 
25,000 00 

27,384 11 



54,429 22 
189,491 56 



17,000 00 
26,924 73 



81,882 78 
49,542 25 
116,821 78 



11,985 29 
36,155 89 
191,486 00 



40,000 00 
100,000 00 



5,754 21 



26,565 82 
308,599 92 



384,205 48 



28.000 00 

91,977 64 

113.307 27 

1,046,757 29 

2,500 00 

451,276 89 



6,000 00 



$10,000 00 



15.000 00 



1,000 00 



15,790 00 



19,000 00 



20,000 00 



5,300 CO 



3,700 00 



$6,421 53 

4,178 95 

40,626 13 



971 00 



315 50 
3,615 25 



18,361 60 
1,910 48 



414 00 



4,429 28 
7,520 42 



1,700 18 
4.333 73 



632 12 



459 00 
6,570 35 



2,170 55 
22,713 83 
16,721 63 



4,570 42 

67,432 70 

1,96C 50 

7,490 00 

13,202 21 
1,677 83 
6,413 00 



25 00 



19,164 39 
5,669 12 
5,343 65 
2,279 36 
32 75 

49,033 78 



2,451 



1 No report. 



- Organizations aided. 



3 Not stated. 



P.D. 17, Part II. 

Charitable Corporations — Continued. 



109 



Legacies 
specifically 
restricted 
to Capital 



Unrestricted 
Legacies 



Current 
Expenditures 



Salaries 

and 

Wages 



Average 
Number 
of Paid 

Em- 
ployees 



Total 

Number 

aided 



Total 

Number 

Free 



Number 

of 

Families 

aided 



$27,750 00 



2,000 00 



3,484 54 



500 CO 



2,000 00 
14.505 26 



$13,000 00 



2,250 00 



1,360 00 



2,000 00 



1,000 00 
1,000 00 
6,350 00 



632 21 



40,977 50 



1,000 00 

42 80 

3,144 67 

16,000 00 



$49,725 91 
5,748 48 
15,562 59 



3,329 76 
1,378 59 



6,190 70 



4,114 16 
9,512 59 



378 00 



23,030 11 
4,391 22 



2,423 40 



6,529 18 
62,361 18 



2,879 21 
20,241 67 



2,795 05 



4,354 43 

950 01 

16,661 13 



1,800 36 
25,947 37 
61,772 82 



5,481 07 

19,582 57 

3,080 45 

9,253 79 

17,565 71 

1.688 31 

15,025 53 

19,910 93 



19,795 26 

46,161 54 

17,551 17 

211,329 84 

307 62 

54,881 36 



$19,961 29 
2,395 00 



1,329 49 
1,329 44 



2,645 63 



1,350 00 
4,869 21 



3,511 00 
736 00 

2,704 19 

-4 

500 00 

_4 

2,565 00 
2,201 26 



647 00 
8,239 92 
2,490 07 



942 50 

_4 

1,249 00 

4,495 35 

4,060 00 

586 48 

5,091 88 

7,783 67 



8,395 40 
4,000 00 
2,555 53 



12,830 25 



41 

8 

114 

30 



10.268 91 3,982 60 



391 

/ 1' 

\ 400 

69 


253 
} 130 


90 

_3 


8 
1,097 


1 

21 


-3 


19 


1 


- 


14 

_3 


1 

_3 


_3 
_3 


2 


2 


3 


207 
894 


6 


- 


6 


- 


- 


10 
1,290 


10 
36 


- 


_3 


_3 


_3 


384 


57 


- 


2,315 


864 


_3 


11 

-3 


11 

_3 


_3 


967 


2 


- 


3 


_3 


-3 


_3 

577 


-3 

91 


605 
10 


16 

79 

510 

f 252 

\ 148 

603 

7 

37 


16 

510 

1 121 

344 

35 


-3 
-3 

69 


41 


37 


- 


44 

157 

325 

9,338 

_3 


40 
53 

998 

-3 


_3 
_3 


113 


113 


- 


37 


2 


- 



< Not separately reported. 



' Report for 6 months. 



110 



P.D. 17, Part II 
Abstracts of Reports of Privat 







Total 


Incum- 


Subscrip- 


Earnings 






Property 


brances on 


tions, Dona- 


and 






reported 


Real EsUite 


tions, etc. 


Refunds 




WoRCESTKU — Con. 










1 


Rotary Club Education Fund of Worcester, The 


-3 


_s 


$6,025 25 


S134 00 


2 


St. Anne's French Canadian Orphanage 


$140,920 47 


122,000 00 


4,556 88 


42,504 77 


3 


St. Vincent's Hospital of Worcester, Massachu- 












setts 


300,000 00 


100.000 00 


1,239 51 


149,659 29 


4 


Society of the Franco-American Dispensary of 












Worcester, MassJU'husetts, The' 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


5 


Temporary Home and Day Nursery Society . 


110,954 44 


- 


8,945 00 


1,942 65 


6 


United Jewish Charities, Inc., The 1 . 


_ 


- 


_ 




7 


Worcester Boys' Club 


372,159 31 


- 


37,165 86 


2,544 76 


8 


Worcester Children's Friend Society . 


240,463 60 


- 


24,710 00 


13,039 26 


9 


Worcester City Missionary Society 


19,548 00 


- 


2,846 09 


- 


10 


Worcester Civic League, Inc 


12.100 00 


4,700 00 


8,582 CO 


379 21 


11 


Worcester Employment Society, The 


65,304 80 


_ 


5,750 00 


3,772 11 


12 


Worcester Free Loan Association i 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


13 


Worcester Garden City, Inc 


- 


- 


2.400 00 


- 


14 


Worcester GirLs' Club House Corporation . 


68,900 00 


7,000 00 


23.815 22 


564 09 


15 


Worcester Hahnemann Hospital 


178,000 00 


- 


599 98 


34,880 07 


16 


Worcester Social Settlement Society . 


5,400 00 


1,900 00 


5 00 


- 


17 


Worcester Society for District Nursing 


112,124 20 


- 


42,001 58 


16,237 33 


18 


Worcester Swedish Charitable Association 


20,387 42 


- 


1,835 00 




19 


Worcester Tuberculosis Relief Association 


7,953 68 


- 




_ 


20 


Young Men's Cliristian Association . 


860,227 19 


225,000 00 


70,975 81 


139,106 13 


21 


Young Women's Christian Association 
Yarmouth. 


252,264 58 




29,575 50 


43,482 67 


22 


Friday Ch'b 

He.vdqu.vrters Out-side of Commonwealth. 


7,000 00 




227 00 


800 02 


23 


American Baptist Foreign Mission Society 


10,002,722 32 


- 


1,429,218 11 


20,659 77 


24 


American Peace Society 


27,100 10 


- 


25,632 16 


- 


25 


Boys' Club Federation, Inc 


850 00 


- 


21,341 00 


1,100 00 


26 


Palou Reconstruction Union, The^ . 


- 


- 


- 




27 


Woman's American Baptist Foreign Mission 












Society 

Totals 


886,715 46 


- 


591,719 76 


~ 




$155,118,393 25 


$4,565,093 78 


$12,540,126 86 $15,286,985 58 

1 



No report. 



* Organizations aided. 



'D. 17, Part II. 

'haritable Corporations — Concluded. 



Ill 



,077 48 



Interest. 
Di\-idends, 


Legacies 
specifically 


Unrestrict«d 


Current 


Salaries 


Average 
Number 
of Paid 


Total 


Total 


Number 
of 




Annuities 
and Rentals 


restricted 
to Capital 


Legacies 


Expenditurt^ 


Wages 


Em- 
ployees 


'a'iSd^'^ 


* F^ee ^ 


Families 
aided 




$53 87 






$4,240 65 






-3 


-J 


-I 


J 






- 


51,386 63 


$9,245 39 


20 


328 


24 


2 


2 


97 78 




$4,250 00 


155,875 84 


-4 


58 


4,120 


105 


- 


3 


2.759 97 


57,092 31 


- 


13,664 51 


6.016 84 


10 


665 


250 


: 


4 
5 
6 

7 


3.622 43 


_ 


_ 


43,464 44 


16.121 66 


30 


4,814 


_ 


_ 


11,095 78 


_ 


11,250 00 


49.439 61 


8.987 38 


7 


236 


84 


167 


8 


934 64 


- 


5,673 03 


3,760 57 


2.450 00 


2 


32 


- 


- 


9 


65 26 


- 


- 


9,008 11 


5.720 60 


5 


/ 2^ 
1 3,566 


} 2,777 


5 


10 


3,084 25 


1,527 17 


- 


12,541 13 


1,171 00 


2 




- 


- 


11 
12 
13 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2.400 00 


1,200 00 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1,441 94 


- 


- 


2,341 18 


1,020 00 


2 


250 


250 


- 


14 


1,953 68 


_ 


29,762 87 


40.C53 68 


-4 


12 


867 


11 


- 


15 


84 80 


_ 


_ 


730 61 


290 10 


3 


50 


50 


- 


16 


6,449 41 


6.C00 00 


6,135 96 


63.136 57 


50,755 42 


36 


21,333 


13,044 


19,680 


17 


39 47 




_ 


3,933 26 


500 00 3 


-3 


_3 


181 


18 


679 24 


_ 


- 


652 84 


- 


- 


- 


_3 


19 


225 46 


- 


- 


200,126 84 


94,221 48 , 80 


49,755 


42,847 


- 


20 


3,553 66 


~ 


2,000 00 


79,243 54 


8.860 59 


15 


-=> 


~" 


~ 


21 


282 75 


- 


- 


1,447 77 


- 


- 


( ^r 


- 


5 


22 


489,688 14 




135.838 86 


2,104,622 99 


579.782 54 


35 


_3 


-3 


-3 


23 


1,732 10 


- 


1,000 00 


28,757 78 


10,751 87 


3 


V- 


- 


-3 


24 


27 63 


155 00 


~ 


24,028 26 


15,710 76 


5 


- 


- 


- 


25 


~ 


~ 


- 


" 


" 


" 


~ 


~ 


~ 


26 



23,981 74 



775,772 63 



$5,909.867 57 $3,601,503 74 52,166,855 32 $32,828,146 53 .?6.086,198 1 



154,108 3,309.512 1,050,159 



3 Not stated. 



* Not separately reported. 



112 P.D. 17, Part III. 

Part III. 

THE CITY AND TOWN ALMSHOUSES 



STATISTICS OF POOR RELIEF. 

Francis Bardwi:ll, Inspector of Almshouses. 

Laws relating to Almshouses. 

For the information of ovei'seei-.^ of the poor, masters of almshouses and 
others eoneemeil, certain laws relating to almshouses are here summarized. 

The Department of Public Welfare is recjuired to visit annually all city and 
town almshouses, and to include in its annual report a statement of their 
condition and management, with its suggestions and recommendations relative 
thereto. (General Laws, chap. 121, sect. 7.) 

The master of every almshouse must keep a register, in a form prescribed by 
the Department of Public Welfare, of the names of the persons received or 
eommitt^, the cities or toA\'ns to which they belong, and the dates of their 
reception and discharge. (General Laws, chap. 47, sect. 17.) 

Every inmate of an almshouse able to work shall be kept diligently em- 
ployed in labor. If he is idle and does not perform such reasonable task as is 
assigned, or if he is stubborn and disorderly, he shall be punished according to 
the orders and regulations established by the directors. (General Laws, chap. 
117, sects. 21 and 22; chap. 47, sect. 21. See also opinion of Attorney General 
given to State Board of Charity November 21, 1904.) 

The only children who can be lawfully supported in a city or town almshouse 
for a period of more than two months are: (1) those who are so defective in 
body or mind as to make their retention in an almshouse desirable; (2) those 
who are under two years of age; (3) those who are under three years of age, 
with mothers who are almshouse inmates and suitable persons to aid in taking 
care of them. In cases of failure of overseers of the poor to remove children 
illegally in almshouses, the Department of Public Welfare is required to 
remove them and provide for them otherwise, at the expense of the city or 
town concerned. (General Laws, chap. 117, sects. 36-38.) 

Provision is made that tramps and vagrants, as well as criminals, shall be 
confined in separate and distinct quarters in all almshouses, and shall not be 
permitted to associate or communicate with pauper inmates. Almshouse ofiSeials 
knowingly "snolating this law are liable to be punished by a fine of not more 
than $300, or by imprisonment for not more than six months, or by both such 
fine and imprisonment. (General Laws, chap. 47, sect. 25.) It should also be 
noted that tramps and vagrants, if physically able, shall perfoim labor of some 
kind, and shall be lodged under conditions prescribed by the State Department 
of Public Health. (General Laws, cliap. 117, sect. 20.) 

The Department of Public Welfare is authorized to ad^-ise with and assist 
ovei^eers of the poor in prepai"ation of plans for almshouse buildings. (Gen- 
eral Laws, chap. 121, sect. 38.) 

Inspection of Almshouses. 

During the year the Department's Inspector has "s-isited every almshouse 
once. Twenty have been visited twice, 3 three times. The inspector has had 
conferences with overseers of the poor, mayors of cities, members of building 
committees, and members of boards of toA\Ti finance on matters pertaining to 
almshouse conditions or construction. There are in Massachusetts 138 alms- 
houses which during the la.st complete municipal year, cared for 9,075 inmates. 

New Almshouses. 
The new almshouses at Andover, Marlborough, Marshfield and Weymouth 
have been completed and are occupied. 



P.D. 17, Part III. 113 

Almshouses closed. 

The almshouses at Stockbridge, West Stockbridg-e and West Boylston have 
been closed. 

Recommendations made. 

It is the duty of the Department's Inspector to take up all matters of 
minor importance touching upon the general welfare and comfort of the alms- 
house inmates and, when advisable, to consult directly with overseers of the 
poor or their representatives. In addition to these personal suggestions the 
Department has made the follomng recommendations to the various boards of 
ovei"seers. 

Bridgewater, that a water closet be installed, 

Douglas, that some provision for a better and more copious water supply 
be made. 

Fitchburg, that new floors be laid in the kitchen and corridors. 

Gloucester, that a wheel chair be provided for a crippled inmate. 

IpsAvich, that a male inmate be examined with a view to having him com- 
mitted to a hospital for the insane. 

Lawrence, that electric lights be extended to that portion of the almshouse 
building used by the aged women. 

Leominster, that one of the male inmates is in need of hospital care and it 
was suggested that he be sent to the State Infinnary. 

Manchester, that an aged inmate, needing hospital care, be sent to the State 
Infirmary. 

Medford, that a male inmate be examined to ascertain his mental condition 
and if the diagnosis wan-ants, that steps be taken for his commitment to a 
hospital for the insane. 

Oxford, that a boy who comes and goes from the almshouse be permanently 
placed. 

Provincetown, that at least one fire extinguisher be purchased. 

Randolph, that one of the male inmates be examined Avith a view to having 
him committed to a hospital for the insane. 

Rockland, that an aged inmate, suffering from a chronic ailment and needing 
hospital care, be sent to the State Infinnary. 

Springfield, that three children whose stay at the almshouse had exceeded 
the limit allowed by law, be suitabl}' and permanently placed. 

Wan-en, that provisions for a feeble-minded boy be made so that he may be 
committed to one of the schools for the feeble-minded. 

Wrentham, that it would be most advisable, because of the age and infirmities 
of the inmates, to have an additional water closet installed on the first floor. 

Almshouse Visitors. 

The almshouse \isitors are local residents, giving their services under the 
Commissioner's appointment. Those now in of&ce are: Adams, Mrs. W. C. 
Plunkett; Amesbury, Mrs. George W. Crowther; Andover, Mrs. Amy F. 
Trow; Athol, Miss Hattie M. French; Beverly, Miss Laura G. Woodbury; 
Boston, Miss Frances G. Curtis and Miss Theresa M. Lally; Charlton, Mrs. 
Edgar W. Preble; Chelmsford, Mrs. Daisy L. Day; Concord, Mrs. H. B. 
Hosmer; Dennis, Miss Ellen H. Underwood; Easthampton, Mrs. Susie Bos- 
worth Munn; Easton, Mrs. Myrtie A. Spooner; Fairhaven, Miss Georgia E. 
Fairfield; Fall River, Mrs. Joseph A. Barry, Mrs. J. Thayer Lincoln, Mrs. 
Francis S. Root, Mrs. Michael F. Sullivan and Mrs. Charles H. Warner; 
Falmouth, Mrs. Alfred F. Kelley; Fitchburg, Mrs. Alvah Crocker; Gardner, 
Mrs. Elbridge R. Jackson; Gloucester, Mrs. J. .E. Anderson; Greenfield, 
Mrs. Henry F. Nash; Holyoke, Mrs. John M. James; Lancaster, Miss Mary 
Belle Bailey; Lawrence, Mrs. Lewis A. Foye; Lee, Mi*s. James Rice and Mi-b. 
H. W. Stevens; Lexington, Mrs. John S. Spaulding; Lynn, Mi-s. A. K. 
Bailey; Maiden, Mrs. Hai-vey L. Boutwell; Manchester, Mi*s. Grace L. Porter; 



114 P.D. 17, Part III. 

Marlborougfh, Mrs. L. H. Tourtellott^; Mattapoisett, Miss Charlotte Parsons; 
Medford, Mrs. Louise G. DeLong; Milton, Mi*s. Mars' H. Siais; Monson, Mrs. 
Minnie A. Clilford; Montague, Mi's. Richard R. L^Tuan; Nantucket, Miss Ella 
F. Sylvia and Mi-s. Josephine S. Brooks; Natick, Mrs. James E. White; 
Newburyport, Miss Fanny C. Stone and Mrs. Frederick Tigh; North Adams, 
Mrs. Lida A. Kimball; Northampton, Miss Clara C. Allen; North Attleborough, 
Mi^. Edwin R. Crossley; Peabody, Mi-s. F. C. Merrill; Pepperell, Mrs. Charles 
1). Hutchinson; Plymouth, Miss Helen Russell; Provincetown, Mrs. Ruth S. 
Snow; Randolph, Mi*s. Daniel F. Flynn; Somerville, Mrs. May Knight South- 
well; Southbridge, Miss Margaret G. Butler; Springfield, Mrs. Julia Judd; 
Taunton, Miss Marie H. Manseau; Waltham, Mi*s. Pryor Fulton; Warren, Mrs. 
Edna DeLand; Wa^tlwrough, Mrs. Andrew B. Adams; West Brookfield, Mrs. 
Eli Convei"se; East Bridgewater, Miv;. Anna S. LeLacheur; West Newbury, 
Miss Emily A. Bailey; Winchendon, Mi-s. Frank B. Spalter; Worcester, Miss 
Nellie E. Barrett, Mrs. Charles F. Darling and Mrs. Harry A. Wilber. 

Reports from Almshouses. 

Tabulated information relating to the various almshouses follo\\Ts. The 
Charlton Almshouse is managed by an association known as the Charlton Poor 
Farm Association and is used in common by the towns of Ashburnham, Auburn, 
Boylston, Brookfield, Charlton, East Brookfield, Hardwick, Holden, Holland, 
Hubbardston, Leicester, Millbury, Oakham, Paxton, Princeton, Rutland, Ster- 
ling and W^tminster. The total annual cost was $10,694.13; net, $8,945.36. 
The several towns comprising the association paid for their share of the expense 
as given in the following table. 



P.D. 17, Part III. 



115 



a 


, , , ,.-.,.,«, ,,-.,,,, ,-.„, ,— , ,- 


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Net 

Annual 

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|||llll|il|l|l||1l||||J^^5oaalalllllll^ 



116 



P.D. 17, Part III. 



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P.D. 17, Part III. 



117 



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118 



P.D. 17, Part III. 



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P.D. 17, Part III. 119 

STATISTICS OF POOR RELIEF. 

Numbers relieved. 

The following information covers public relief, whether rendered in insti- 
tutions or outside, and aid rendered by all public agencies, whether State or 
local. 

The tables given below are arranged to show numbers relieved and their 
analysis by age, sex and nativity. The tabulations are concluded by figures for 
cost of all relief. 

Table I shoAVs the number supported or relieved by the several cities and 
towns during the year beginning April 1, 1922, and ending March 31, 1923. 
All persons are included, regardless of settlement. The total number receiving 
aid in any form, exclusive of vagrants and waj'farers, was 98,632. Of this 
number, 10,852 were aided in institutions and 87,780 — the remainder — outside, 
either in private families or in their own homes. Of the persons aided in 
institutions, 7,649 were relieved in the various city and town almshouses, 
leaving 3,203 Avho were cared for in other institutions. Of the outsside aid, 
2,768 cases were aided in private families other than their own, while 85,012 
were reported as having been aided in their own homes. This last figure com- 
prises practically all city and town aid usually known as local public outdoor 
relief, including that under Chapter 118 of the General Laws. 

There is a decrease of 722 from the preceding year in the number aided 
in institutions, and also a decrease of 18,233 in the number aided outside. 

Table II supplies the same data for persons aided or relieved by the State 
as are shown in Table I for local relief. In addition to aid rendered directly 
by the State, this table includes also all those cases included in Table I, in 
which the relief has been rendered by cities and towns in the first instance 
and reimbursed by the State as required by law. This table shows 26,044 
persons aided by the State. Of this number, the aid in 22,262 cases was first 
rendered by the several cities and town>s. The remaining 3,782 oases were aided 
by the State : 3,018 of them at the State Infirmary ; 498 in the almshouse 
ward at the State Farm; and 266 at the Massachusetts Hospital School. 

Table III affords a rapid glance at the movement of population in the 
dependent group during the year under analysis. Thus it appears that 60,864 
cases represented approximately the total number of persons receiving aid 
April 1, 1922. About 75 per cent of these were receiving relief locally. During 
the year 41,550 new cases were admitted to relief; 25 per cent of this figure 
were aided either directly or through reimbui^ement by the State. The pei^sons 
who passed out of care during that same period numbered 53,452; \\z., city 
and town cases, 36,983; State cases, 16,469. Those in this total released by 
death numbered 2,146, and 1,571 were pei'sons transferred. At the close of 
the year, therefore, the cities and towns had 39,387 pei"sons in receipt of relief, 
and the State had 9,575, making a total of 48,962. 

Table IV begins classification of the whole number of persons aide<l, and 
shows the analysis by color, nativity and sex. Of tlie 102,414 persons so 
aided, 48,782 were males and 53,632 were females. The colored races fur- 
nished only 2,166 of the whole number. The native-born whites — 72,888 — 
number more than double the foreign born of the white races, the 26,818 
of this latter group representing a proportionate decrease of 20 per cent over 
last year. The females of the total native born outnumber the males by 2.6%, 
Avhile of the total foreign born, the females outnumber the males by 31 per cent. 

Table V gives a further interesting analysis of the native-born persons aided 
during the year classified by parent nativity. 

The parents of 22,975 were both native; 36,353 were children of foreign- 
born parents; 13,010 were of parents one of whom was foreign born or 
unknown; while the nativity of parents in 2,345 cases remained unascertained. 
It appears from this table, therefore, that of the 102,414 persons receiving aid 
in Massachusetts in the year ending March 31, 1923, there were at least 



120 P.D. 17, Part III. 

63,515 Avho were either foreign born or were of the first generation in our 
citizenship. 

By Table VI it appears tliat of the 102,414 cases aided, 10,739 were under 
five; 46,977 Avere under fifteen; 56,392, or 55 per cent, including the above, 
were under twentj^; 33,897, or 33 per cent, were between twenty and sixty; 
11,089, or 10.7 per cent, were over that age. The ages of 1,036 were unknown. 

Among the poor pei*sons relieved are always a considerable number of 
mental defectives who for one reason or another have not been committed 
and are therefore not cared for in the special institutions, such as the asylums 
for the insane, maintained for that purpose. In regard to this class it is to 
be noted further that, since no court has passed upon their mental condition, 
their classification here is made only because, in the opinion of the respective 
authorities making the returns, there is no doubt of their defect. Table VII 
affords a rough classification into three groups, according to the nature of the 
defect, and a division by sex. The total number thus cared for was 314, 
namely, 183 males and 131 females. Two hundred forty-three of these cases 
were relieved by the cities and towns; the remaining 71 of the number, having 
no settlement, were aided at the expense of the State. One hundred sixty- 
seven of the Avhole number were classed as " insane ", mostly the senile and 
mildly insane to be found in the almshouses. This total includes one hundred 
six males and 61 females. One hundred five were called " idiotic," namely, 
57 males and 48 females. The " epileptics " totaled 42, of whom 20 were 
males and 22 Avere females. 

Table YIII calls attention more pointedly to the sex and the nature of 
discharge from relief of those persons who passed out of aid during the year. 
Of the 53,452 cases so dismissed, 27,061 were males and 26,391 were females. 
Forty-six per cent, or 25,035 were released to the care of relatives or friends. 
In this group the females preponderated slightly. About 3 per cent, or 1,571, 
of the whole number were transferred to other institutions, Avhile 46 per cent 
of the aggregate were discharged Avithout relatives or friends or other authori- 
ties agreeing to look after them. The great majority in this last group were 
persons assisted through illness, after which they became self-supporting 
again. 

As appears from Table IX the foreign born Avho were receiving public 
relief during the year numbered 27,162, or 26.5 per cent of the entire number 
of persons aided. This percentage is less than the proportion of foreign 
born in the population generally (31.4 percent) by 4.9 per cent. Canada 
furnished 6,164 of this number; England and Wales, 1,583; Germany, 233; 
Ireland, 5,691; Italy, 4,292; Russia and Poland, 2,972; Scandinavia, 435; 
and Scotland, 392 ; all other countries, 5,400. 

Table X shows the percentage of the various classes aided to the whole 
number relieved. Thus of the 102,414 persons relieved, 74.5 percent were 
settled cases, receiving their assistance out of local taxes; 25.43 percent were 
unsettled, and, though relieved by the respective cities and toAvns in the first 
instance in a majorit^f of cases, Avere ultimately aided out of the State tax. 
As to the place in Avhich relief Avas given, 14.28 per cent of the total Avere aided 
in institutions, namely, 7.47 per cent in almshouses; 3.69 per cent in State 
institutions; and 3.12 per cent in other institutions, mostly under private 
management. Outdoor relief, designated as aid " outside ", Avas given in 
85.72 per cent of all the cases. Most of these, namely, 83 per cent, were 
relieved in their OAvn homes. Aid AA^as giA^en in private families other than 
the recipient's OAvn — mostly boarded cases — in 2.72 per cent instances. 
Percentages of age shoAV that 56,01 per cent Avere minors, 32.15 per cent Avere 
betAveen the ages of tAA'enty-one and sixty, and 10.83 per cent Avere sixty or 
over. The ages of 1.01 per cent Avere unknoA\m. Sexes differ slightly, males 
rating 47.6 per cent and females 52.4 per cent. 

The number of colored persons AA^as very small, totaling only 2.11 per cent. 

By reason of thoroughgoing classification in the care of defectives, the per- 



P.D. 17, Part III. 121 

centage of those men/tally deficieiut persons still cared for as poor-relief 
cases is exceedingly small, and tends always to decrease. The mental con- 
dition of all the cases aided shows, on analysis, that 99.70 per cent were 
sane, .16 per cent were insane, .10 per cent were idiotic, and .04 per cent were 
epileptic. The proportion of sane persons in last year's returns was 99.72 
per cent. 

It is of further interest to view at a glance the numerical relationship to 
the whole population of the persons relieved at public expense as appears 
in Table XI, which exhibits the number of each class in every thousand of the 
population of the State on a basis of the census of 1920. Thus it is shown 
that in each thousand of the population there were 26.58 indigent persons 
relieved at public expense. Of these, 12.66 Avere males and 13.92 were females. 
The native born numbered 19.38 in the thousand; foreign born, 7.05; native 
born of foreign parentage, 9.43; and those of unknown nativity, .15. The 
proportion of vagrants reported was 6.61 in the thousand. 

Cost of Poor Relief. 

The funds laid out by the several cities and towns for all poor relief within 
their respective fiscal years are shown in Table XII. The aggregate is classified 
as "ordinary", or maintenance, and "extraordinary", or special. Together with 
the ordinary outlays are shown the receipts on account of maintenance, and the 
difference, set out under " net ordinary expenditures." The ordinary outlay 
is classified as expenses in institutions and outside. This subdivision follows 
the classifications in Table I regarding the nature and the place of aid. The 
grand totals in Table XII show that an aggregate of $8,675,996.89 was laid 
out by the several cities and towns. Of this sum, $8,566,879.89 was ordinary 
outlay, or maintenance; the remainder, or $109,117.00, was expended for 
sundry improvements, all of it at the city and town almshouses. Of the money 
expended for maintenance, $1,876,288.35 was expended for almshouse care> 
and $568,122.60 for relief in other institutions. Care in private families took 
$367,864.93, and relief in the recipients' own homes, i.e., outdoor poor relief, 
totaled $5,279,658.80. The cost of administration, including salary and office 
expenses of the overseers, but exclusive of institution administration, came 
to $474,945.21. The total receipts on account of ordinary expenditures were 
$2,398,786.01, — classified as receipts on account of institutions, $429,858.49, 
and all other, $1,968,927.52. This latter portion of the receipts is made up 
mostly of reimbursements by cities and towns ultimately liable, and from the 
State treasury in unsettled cases. Substracting receipts leaves $6,168,500.95 
as the net ordinary outlay. 

In Table XIII the analysis shown for cities and towns by Table XII is 
carried out for cases aided out of the State funds. Of the $2,052,972.10 
expended for this purpose, $1,956,431.33 was on account of ordinary expendi- 
tures, laid out as folloAvs: at the State Infirmary, $411,869.58; at the State 
Farm, $55,167.34; at the Hospital School, $40,089.82; and all other expendi- 
tures, outside of institutions, $1,449,304.59. Extraordinary expenditures totaled 
$96,540.77, — all expended for special improvements at the several institutions 
just enumerated. Inasmuch as it is impossible to trace institution expenditures 
to the separate individuals receiving the aid, the figures set out under the 
State tables of cost are arrived at by taking from total expenditures that pro- 
portion which the number relieved bears to the total inmate population of the 
institution. 

In Table XIV State and local outlays are added, showing that of the $8,330,- 
182.98 expended for public poor relief, $8,124,525.21 was for ordinary outlavs, 
of which $2,521,679.20 went for institutional relief and $5,602,846.01 was for 
relief outside. The total of extraordinary expenditures was $205,657.77. 



122 P.D. 17, Part III. 

Table I. — Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during the Year ending 

March 31, 1923. 











Aggre- 


In Institutions 


Outside 


CITIES AND 














TOWNS 


gate 




In Alms- 
houses 


In Other 




In Pri- 


In their 






Total 


Insti- 


Total 


vate 


Own 








tutions 




Families 


Homes 


Abington 


93 


_ 


_ 


_ 


93 


4 


89 


Acton . 








19 


1 


- 


1 


18 


1 


17 


Acushnet 








64 


6 


- 


6 


58 


1 


57 


Adams 








141 


18 


16 


2 


123 


3 


120 


ARawam 








29 


2 




2 


27 


- 


27 


Alford 












- 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


Amesbury . 








240 


20 


20 


- 


220 


- 


220 


Amherst 








41 


5 


- 


5 


36 


6 


30 


Aiidover 








102 


23 


13 


10 


79 


1 


78 


Arlington 








112 


6 




6 


106 


20 


86 


Ashburnham 








19 


2 


_ 


2 


17 


- 


17 


Ashbv 








7 




_ 


1 


6 


- 


6 


Ashfield 








5 


_ 


_ 


_ 


5 


- 


5 


Ashland 








60 


3 


_ 


3 


57 


4 


53 


Athol . 








212 


15 


14 


1 


197 


5 


192 


Attleboro . 








431 


30 


19 


11 


401 


21 


380 


Auburn 








63 








63 


- 


63 


Avon . 








17 


6 


- 


6 


11 


- 


11 


Ayer . 








11 


9 


6 


3 


2 


- 


2 


Barnstable . 








188 


24 


20 


4 


164 


12 


152 


Barre . 








21 


11 


6 


5 


10 


2 


8 


Becket 








5 


1 




1 


4 


2 


2 


Bedford 








4 




_ 


- 


4 


1 


3 


Belchertown 








14 


3 


2 


1 


11 


- 


11 


Bellingham 








23 


6 


6 


- 


17 


1 


16 


Belmont 








42 


7 


- 


7 


35 


4 


31 


Berkley 








5 




- 


- 


5 


- 


5 


Berlin 








16 


_ 


_ 


- 


16 


3 


13 


Bernardston 










_ 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


Beverly 








1,647 


67 


. 44 


23 


1,580 


- 


1,580 


Billerica 








47 


6 


6 


- 


41 


2 


39 


Blackstone . 








25 


2 


_ 


2 


23 


- 


23 


Blandford . 








3 




- 


- 


3 


1 


2 


Bolton 








6 


1 


_ 


1 


5 


1 


4 


Boston 








16.282 


1,969 


1,785 


184 


14,313 


1,066 


13,247 


Bourne 








52 


9 


- 


9 


43 


8 


35 


Boxborough 












- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Boxford 








2 


2 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


Boylston 








9 


4 


- 


4 


5 


- 


5 


Braintree . 








241 


31 


24 


7 


210 


13 


197 


Brewster 








10 




_ 


_ 


10 


3 


7 


Bridgewater 








97 


22 


10 


12 


75 


- 


75 


Brimfield . 








3 


_ 


— 


— 


3 


3 


— 


Brockton 








2,014 


131 


107 


24 


1,883 


47 


1,836 


Brookfield . 








39 


2 


2 


- 


37 


1 


36 


Brookline . 








339 


31 


16 


15 


308 


15 


293 


Bvickland . 








9 


4 


3 


1 


5 


- 


5 


Burhngton . 








17 


1 


_ 


1 


16 


- 


16 


Cambridge 








2.955 


238 


203 


35 


2,717 


33 


2,684 


Canton 








85 


8 


7 


1 


77 


8 


69 


Carlisle 








8 


1 


1 


- 


7 


1 


6 


Carver 








24 




- 


- 


24 


8 


16 


Charlemont 








3 


1 


- 


1 


2 


1 


1 


Charlton 








12 


- 


- 


- 


12 


1 


11 


Chatham . 








14 


2 


- 


2 


12 


5 


7 


Chelmsford 








75 


8 


6 


2 


67 


1 


66 


Chelsea 








1,842 


106 


- 


106 


1,736 


26 


1,710 


Cheshire . 








11 


3 


- 


3 


8 


3 


5 


Chester 








20 


- 


- 


- 


20 


1 


19 


Chesterfield 








_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Chicopee 








1,141 


57 


41 


16 


1,084 


- 


1,084 


Chilmark . 








_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Clarksburg 








18 


- 


- 


- 


18 


- 


18 


Clinton 








255 


19 


15 


4 


236 


2 


234 


Cohasset 








84 


13 


11 


2 


71 


1 


70 


Coh^in 








8 


- 


- 


- 


8 


4 


4 


Concord 








61 


3 


3 


- 


58 


6 


52 


Conway 








18 


- 


- 


- 


18 


1 


17 


Cummington 








7 


1 


- 


1 


6 


1 


5 


Dalton 








81 


2 


- 


2 


79 


2 


77 


Dana . 








18 


1 


_ 


1 


17 


- 


17 


Dan vers 








242 


4 


2 


2 


238 


23 


215 


Dartmouth 








275 


20 


9 


11 


255 


15 


240 


Dedham . 








234 


16 


9 


7 


218 


8 


210 


Deerfield . 








27 

1 


1 


~ 


1 


26 


' 


25 



P.D. 17, Part III. 123 

Table I. — Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during the Year ending 

March 31, 75^5 — Continued. 











Aggre- 


In Institutions 


Outside 


CITIES AND 














TOWNS 


gate 


Total 


In Alms- 
houses 


In Other \ 
Insti- j 


Total 


In Pri- 
vate 


In their 
Own 








tutions 




Families 


Homes 


Dennis 


37 


4 


4 


i 


33 


1 


32 


Dighton 








29 


_ 


- 


- 


29 




28 


Douglas 








77 


4 


4 


_ 


73 


- 


73 


Dover 








4 


1 




1 


3 


- 


3 


Dracut 








68 


6 


_ 


6 


62 


- 


62 


Dudley 








100 




_ 




100 


5 


95 


Dunstable . 










_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Duxbury . 








37 


7 


7 


_ 


30 


4 


26 


East Bridgewater 








48 


6 


6 


- 


42 


- 


42 


East Brookfield . 








3 




1 


- 


2 


2 


- 


East Longmeado 


sv 






67 


10 




10 


57 


5 


52 


Eastham 








3 




_ 


_ 


3 


1 


2 


Easthampton 








294 


39 


21 


18 


255 


6 


249 


Easton 








73 


4 


3 


1 


69 


5 


64 


Edgartown 








13 








13 


5 


8 


Egremont . 








2 


_ 


- 


- 


2 


1 


1 


Enfield 








4 


_ 


_ 


_ 


4 


4 


- 


Erving 








53 


_ 


_ 


_ 


53 


3 


50 


Essex . 








15 


8 


_ 


8 


7 


1 


6 


Everett 








1,014 


43 


_ 


43 


971 


51 


920 


Fairhaven . 








253 


19 


17 


2 


234 


1 


233 


Fall River . 








5,127 


713 


460 


253 


4,414 




4,414 


Falmouth . 








55 


9 


8 


1 


46 


1 


45 


Fitchburg . 








1,841 


313 


80 


233 


1,528 


4 


1,524 


Florida 








7 


_ 


_ 


_ 


7 


_ 


7 


Foxborough 








51 


_ 


- 


- 


51 


8 


43 


Framingham 








345 


40 


- 


40 


305 


2 


303 


Franklin 








87 


3 


3 




84 


_ 


84 


Freetown 








21 


1 




1 


20 


- 


20 


Gardner 








663 


32 


15 


17 1 


631 


14 


617 


Gay Head . 






















Georgetown 








34 


3 


1 


2 


31 


2 


29 


Gill . 








3 






_ 


3 


1 


2 


Gloucester . 








1,398 


101 


99 


2 


1,297 


1 


1,296 


Goshen . 








12 


1 




1 


11 


- 


11 


Gosnold 












_ 


_ 




_ 




Grafton 








126 


10 


10 


- 


116 


5 


111 


Granby 








3 


1 


_ 


1 


2 


1 


1 


Granville 








5 




_ 




5 


1 


4 


Great Barringtor 


I 






78 


5 


- 


5 


73 


12 


61 


Greenfield . 








264 


30 


13 


17 


234 


- 


234 


Greenwich . 








3 


2 




2 


1 


_ 


1 


Groton 








12 


5 


4 


1 


7 


1 


6 


Groveland . 








31 








31 


3 


28 


Hadley 








38 


2 


- 


2 


36 


2 


34 


Halifax 








2 


1 


_ 


1 


1 


- 


1 


Hamilton . 








18 


2 


_ 


2 


16 


3 


13 


Hampden . 








5 


3 


_ 


3 


2 




2 


Hancock . 








2 




_ 




2 


_ 


2 


Hanover 








47 


5 


5 


_ 


42 


3 


39 


Hanson 








13 


3 


3 


_ 


10 


_ 


10 


Hardwick . 








39 


1 




1 


38 


3 


35 


Harvard 








1 


1 


1 






_ 


- 


Harwich . 








53 


8 


7 


1 


45 


- 


45 


Hatfield . 








9 








9 


- 


9 


Haverhill . 








3,140 


724 


142 


582 


2,416 


- 


2,416 


Hawley 








3 


2 




2 


1 


1 


- 


Heath 












_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


~ 


Hingham 








95 


12 


11 


1 


83 


2 


81 


Hinsdale 








23 








23 


4 


19 


Holbrook . 








27 


_ 


_ 


- 


27 


1 


26 


Holden 








38 


17 


_ 


17 


21 


- 


21 


Holland . 












_ 






- 


_ 


Holliston . 








48 


8 


8 


_ 


40 


_ 


40 


Holyoke . 








2.282 


382 


289 


93 


1.900 


- 


1,900 


Hopedale 








28 


2 




2 


26 


3 


23 


Hopkinton 








16 


_ 


_ 


_ 


16 


- 


16 


Hubbardston 








7 


6 


_ 


6 


1 


_ 


1 


Hudson 








104 


9 


5 


4 


95 


- 


95 


Hull . 








62 


3 




3 


59 


3 


56 


Hyntington 








32 


1 


_ 


1 


31 


7 


24 


Ipswich 








133 


8 


8 




125 


10 


115 


Kingston 








25 


_ 


_ 


_ 


25 


4 


21 


I^keville . 








1 7 


_ 


_ 


_ 


7 


2 


5 


Lancaster . 








' 61 


13 


4 


9 


48 


5 


43 



124 P.D. 17, Part III. 

Table I. — X umber of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during the Year ending 
March 31, 1923 — Continued. 









Aggre- 


In Institittions 


Outside 


CITIES AND 














TOWNS 


gate 




In Alms- 
houses 


In Other 




In Pri- 


In their 






Total 


Insti- 


Total 


vate 


Own 








tutions 




Families 


Homes 


Lanesborough .... 


9 








9 


2 


7 


I^wTence . 






2.536 


472 


455 


17 


2,064 


28 


2.036 


Lee . 






34 


6 


6 


- 


28 


— 


28 


Leicester 






44 


7 


3 


4 


37 


1 


36 


Lenox 






43 


4 




4 


39 


1 


38 


Leominster 






288 


27 


16 


11 


261 


14 


247 


Leveret t 






11 








11 


5 


6 


Lexington . 






161 


11 


4 


7 


150 


2 


148 


Leyden 






2 




_ 


_ 


2 


- 


2 


Lincoln 






9 


2 


1 


1 


7 


- 


7 


Littleton 






22 


2 


2 




20 


3 


17 


Longnieadow 






3 


3 




3 




- 


- 


Ix>well 






5,659 


1.034 


924 


110 


4,625 


- 


4.625 


Ludlow 






295 


7 




7 


288 


6 


282 


Lunenburg 






17 


4 


4 


- 


13 


- 


13 


Lynn . 






3.917 


146 


97 


49 


3,771 


36 


3,735 


Lynnfield . 






3 


2 




2 




_ 


1 


Maiden 






817 


100 


66 


34 


717 


2 


715 


Manchester 






43 


5 


5 




38 


3 


35 


Mansfield . 






114 


9 


8 


I 


105 


8 


97 


Marblehead 






201 


30 


19 


11 


171 


1 


170 


Marion 






25 


10 




10 


15 


3 


12 


Marlborough 






223 


64 


45 


19 


159 


6 


153 


Marshfield . 






34 


9 


7 


2 


25 


- 


25 


Maslipee 






2 








2 


- 


2 


-Mattapoisett 






31 


5 


4 


1 


26 


1 


25 


Mavnard 






76 






_ 


76 


4 


72 


Med field . 






35 


_ 


_ 


_ 


35 


8 


27 


Medford . 






184 


28 


7 


21 


156 


- 


156 


Medway 






56 


7 


7 




49 


- 


49 


Melrose 






162 


17 


1 


16 


145 


4 


141 


Mendon 






5 








5 


2 


3 


Merrimac 






31 


1 


_ 


1 


30 


8 


22 


Methuen 






332 


13 


13 




319 


- 


319 


Middleborough . 






158 


13 


13 


- 


145 


- 


145 


Middlefield 












_ 


_ 


- 


- 


Middleton . 






20 


_ 


_ 


_ 


20 


- 


20 


Milford 






385 


40 


37 


3 


345 


4 


341 


Millbury . 






152 


8 


4 


4 


144 


2 


142 


Millis . 






14 


1 




1 


i 13 


- 


13 


Millville . 






20 


1 


_ 


1 


19 


2 


17 


Milton 






55 


15 


5 


10 


40 


- 


40 


Monroe 














1 


- 


- 


Monson 






47 


11 


11 


_ 


i • 36 


7 


29 


Montague . 






91 


8 


8 


_ 


83 


1 


82 


Monterey . 






1 


1 




1 


- 


- 


- 


Montgomery 






6 




_ 


_ 


6 


- 


6 


Mount Washington 








_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Xahant 






8 


_ 


_ 


_ 


8 


- 


8 


Nantucket . 






52 


22 


22 


_ 


30 


1 


29 


Xatick 






273 


32 


26 


6 


241 


3 


238 


Need ham . 






121 


6 




6 


115 


9 


106 


New Ashford 






1 




_ 


_ 


1 


1 


- 


New Bedford 






5.908 


372 


352 


20 


5,536 


264 


5,272 


New Braintree . 






1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


— 


— 


— 


New Marlborough 






1 12 


2 


_ 


2 


10 


1 


9 


New Salem 






25 


2 


_ 


2 


23 


1 


22 


Newbury . 






32 


3 


_ 


3 


29 


1 


28 


Newburj-port 






249 


37 


36 


1 


212 


6 


206 


Newton 






586 


33 


18 


15 


553 


4 


549 


Norfolk . 






20 


3 


2 




17 


2 


15 


North Adams 






335 


54 


22 


32 


281 


- 


281 


North Andover . 






89 


12 


8 


4 


77 


2 


75 


North Attleborough 






239 


26 


26 




213 


1 


212 


North Brookfield 






49 


8 


8 


_ 


41 


- 


41 


North Reading . 






23 


3 


1 


2 


20 


^ 


17 


Northampton 






427 


62 


32 


30 


365 


1 


364 


Northborough . 






30 








30 


4 


26 


North bridge 






147 


26 


8 


18 


121 


- 


121 


Northfield . 






19 


_ 


_ 


- 


1 19 


1 


18 


Norton 






74 


_ 


_ 


- 


74 


2 


72 


Norwell 






1 17 


11 


3 


8 


6 


4 


2 


Norwood . 






143 


6 


1 


5 


1 137 


13 


124 


Oak Bluffs . 






11 


1 ~ 






i 11 


5 


6 


Oakham 






1 


1 1 
1 


1 


- 


i 


~ 


~ 



P.D. 17, Part III. 125 

Table I. — Niimher of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during the Year ending 

March 31, 1923 — Continued. 











Aggre- 


In Institutions 


OUTSIBE 


CITIES AND 














TOWNS 


gate 




In Alms- 
houses 


In Other 


1 


In Pri- 


In their 






Total 


Insti- 


Total 


vate 


Own 








tutions 




Families 


Homes 


Orange 


120 


4 


_ 


4 


116 


8 


108 


Orleans 








13 


2 


- 


2 


11 


1 


10 


Otis . 








1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 




Oxford 








84 


16 


13 


3 


68 


6 


62 


Palmer 








116 


19 


16 


3 


97 


I 


96 


Paxton 








2 


2 


- 


2 




- 




Peabody . 








454 


48 


45 


3 


406 


35 


371 


Pelham 








15 


1 


- 


1 


14 


5 


9 


Pembroke . 








31 


7 


5 


2 


24 




24 


Pepperell . 








50 


6 


6 




44 


2 


42 


Peru . 








— 


— 


— 


— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Petersham . 








8 


- 


_ 


_ 


8 


1 


7 


Phillipston 








5 


- 


- 


- 


5 


1 


4 


Pittsfield . 








943 


159 


70 


89 


784 


3 


781 


Plainfield . 










- 


- 










Plainville . 








4 


2 


_ 


2 


2 


_ 


2 


Plymouth . 








263 


15 


13 


2 


248 


- 


248 


Plympton . 








1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


Prescott 








1 


— 


— 


— 


1 


_ 


1 


Princeton . 








3 


3 


3 


- 




_ 




Provincetown 








188 


8 


8 


- 


180 


2 


178 


Quincy 








696 


129 


40 


89 


567 


2 


565 


Randolph . 








77 


23 


23 


- 


54 


2 


52 


Raynham . 








24 


2 


- 


2 


22 


1 


21 


Reading 








178 


16 


7 


9 


162 


4 


158 


Rehoboth . 








15 


- 


- 


- 


15 


5 


10 


Revere 








533 


16 


- 


16 


517 


21 


496 


Richmond . 








~ 


- 


_ 


_ 








Rochester . 








25 


3 


- 


3 


22 


3 


19 


Rockland . 








215 


10 


9 


1 


205 


13 


192 


Rockport . 








146 


11 


9 


2 


135 




135 


Rowe . 








1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


_ 


I 


Rowley 








30 


2 


- 


2 


28 


_ 


28 


Royalston . 








24 


1 


_ 


1 


23 


8 


15 


Russell 








4 


- 


_ 


— 


4 


1 


3 


Rutland 








16 


3 


3 


_ 


13 


2 


11 


Salem 








2,987 


195 


120 


75 


2,792 


20 


2,772 


Salisbury . 








34 


- 


_ 


- 


34 


11 


23 


Sandisfield . 








1 


- 




- 


1 


1 


_ 


Sandwich . 








24 


- 


- 


- 


24 


2 


22 


Saugus 








206 , 


14 


7 


7 


192 


10 


182 


Savoy 








6 


- 


- 


- 


6 


1 


5 


Scituate 








49 


1 


- 


1 


48 


5 


43 


Seekonk 








46 


3 


3 


- 


43 




43 


Sharon 








21 


1 


- 


1 


20 


3 


17 


Sheffield . 








18 1 


2 


- 


2 


16 


8 


8 


Shelburne . 








5 


3 


- 


3 


2 


_ 


2 


Sherborn . 








29 




- 




29 


_ 


29 


Shirley 








58 


12 


- 


12 


46 


1 


45 


Shrewsbury 








119 


- 


- 


- 


119 


_ 


119 


Shutesbury 










- 


- 


- 




- 




Somerset . 








75 


7 


6 


1 


68 


_ 


68 


Somerville . 








1.061 


159 


47 


112 


902 


36 


866 


South Hadley 








102 


19 


6 


13 


83 




83 


Southampton 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


Southborough 








13 


- 


- 


- 


13 


5 


8 


Southbridge 








433 


31 


23 


8 


402 


20 


382 


Southwick . 








12 


3 


- 


3 


9 


- 


9 


Spencer 








82 


16 


16 


- 


66 


_ 


66 


Springfield . 






• 


3,272 


644 


514 


130 


2,628 


11 


2,617 


Sterling 








11 


2 


- 


2 


9 


2 


7 


Stockbridge 








6 


2 


2 


- 


4 


1 


3 


Stoneham . 








99 


10 


7 


3 


89 


3 


86 


Stoughton . 








99 


14 


9 


5 


85 


1 


84 


Stow . 








3 


_ 


_ 


- 


3 


3 


_ 


Sturbridge . 








22 


9 


5 


4 


13 




13 


Sudbury 








12 


1 


- 


1 


11 


- 


11 


Sunderland 








32 


- 


- 


- 


32 


_ 


32 


Sutton 








105 


6 


2 


4 


99 


10 


89 


Swampscott 








128 


6 


- 


6 


122 


2 


120 


Swansea 








6 


_ 


_ 


_ 


6 


_ 


6 


Taunton 








1,301 


158 


151 


7 


1,143 


48 


1,095 


Templeton . 








19 


- 


- 


- 


19 


3 


16 


Tewksbury 








42 


3 


- 


3 


39 


- 


39 


Tisbury 








7 


! 


~ 




7 


~ 


7 



126 P.D. 17, Part III. 

Table I. — Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during the Year ending 

March 31, / ^^5 — Concluded. 













Aggre- 


In 


Institutions 


Outside 


CITIES AND 














TOWNS 


gate 




In Alms- 
houses 


In Other 




In Pri- 


In their 






Total 


Insti- 


Total 


vate 


Own 








tutions 




Families 


Homes 


Tolland 


J 


J 




J 






• 


Topsfiekl 








7 


4 


- 


4 


3 


3 


- 


Townsend . 








54 


10 


8 


2 


44 


1 


43 


Truro . 








2 


- 


_ 


- 


2 


_ 


2 


Tynssborovigh 








- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 




Tyringhaiu 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


I'pton 








35 


6 


6 


- 


29 


- 


29 


I xbridgo 










36 


6 


5 


1 


30 


_ 


30 


Wakefield 










159 


13 


13 




146 


1 


145 


Wales 










2 


- 




- 


2 


2 




Walpole 










95 


2 


_ 


2 


93 


15 


78 


Walt ham 










490 


46 


36 


10 


444 


2 


442 


Ware . 










161 


14 


13 


1 


147 


_ 


147 


Wareham 










125 


8 


7 


1 


117 


2 


115 


Warren 










87 


10 


7 


3 


77 


1 


76 


Warwick 










11 


- 




- 


11 


1 


10 


Wjishington 










2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


1 


1 


Watertown 










432 


17 


14 


3 


415 


28 


387 


Wayland 










16 


1 


- 


1 


15 




15 


Webster 










351 


18 


16 


2 


333 


1 


332 


Wellesley 










40 


1 




1 


39 


3 


36 


Well fleet 










25 


_ 


_ 


_ 


25 


4 


21 


Wendell 










20 


1 


- 


1 


19 




19 


Wenhain 










9 


_ 


- 


_ 


9 


_ 


9 


West Boylston 








11 


9 


7 


2 


2 


1 


1 


West Bridgewate 


r 






60 


- 


- 


- 


60 


4 


56 


West Brookfield 








11 


2 


1 


1 


9 


_ 


9 


West Newbury 








21 


- 


- 


- 


21 


2 


19 


W^est Springfield 






385 


8 


- 


8 


377 


17 


360 


West Stock bridge 






9 


2 


1 


1 


7 


2 


5 


West TLsbury 






1 


- 


_ 


_ 


1 


1 




Westborough 








58 


13 


11 


2 


45 




45 


Westfield . 








426 


7 


- 


7 


419 


3 


416 


Westford 








76 


9 


6 


3 


67 


9 


58 


Westhampton 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




Westminster 








16 


3 


2 


1 


13 


4 


9 


Weston 








5 


1 


- 


1 


4 


3 


1 


West port 










52 


7 


6 


1 


45 


- 


45 


West wood 










16 


1 


- 


1 


15 


- 


15 


We V mouth 










316 


6 


- 


6 


310 


21 


289 


Whately 










12 




- 




12 




12 


Whitman 










46 


3 


_ 


3 


43 


9 


34 


Wilbraham 








55 




- 




55 




55 


Williamsburg 








63 


4 


- 


4 


59 


- 


59 


Williamstown 








33 


- 


- 


- 


33 


- 


33 


Wilmington 








34 


3 


- 


3 


31 


1 


30 


Winchendon 








236 


34 


21 


13 


202 


1 


201 


Winchester . 








230 


1 


- 


1 


229 


12 


217 


Windsor 








1 




- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


W'inthrop 








74 


6 


- 


6 


68 


10 


58 


Wo burn 








416 


26 


26 


- 


390 


- 


390 


Worcester 








4,570 


248 


243 


5 


4,322 


162 


4,160 


Worthington 








10 


- 


- 


- 


10 


- 


10 


Wrentham . 








24 


9 


9 


- 


15 


- 


15 


Yarmouth . 








48 
98.632 


- 


- 


- 


48 


5 


43 


Totals 










10,852 


7,649 


3,203 


87,780 


2,768 


85,012 



P.D. 17, Part III. 127 

Table II. — Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved by the State in Insti- 
tutions, in Private Families and in their Own Homes, during the Year ending 
March 31, 1923. 





In iNSTITtTTIONS 


Outside 


Aggregate 


Total 


State 
Infirm- 
ary 


Alms- 
house 
Ward, 
State 
Farm 


Massa- 
chusetts 
Hos- 
pital 

School 


Town 

or 
City 
Alms- 
house 


Other 
Insti- 
tutions 


Total 


In 
Pri- 
vate 
Fami- 
lies 


In 
their 
Own 
Homes 


26,044 


5,429 


3,018 


498 


266 


590 


1,057 


20,615 


239 


20,376 



Table III. — Movement during the Year ending March 31, 1923, of the Poor 

Supported or Relieved. 



SOURCE OF SUPPORT 
OR RELIEF 


Number 
Sup- 
ported 
or 
Relieved 
April 1, 
1922 


Number 
admitted 

to 

Support 

or Relief 

during 

the Year 


Number who died, were 

DISCHARGED FROM SUPPORT, OR WERE 

TRAJSTSFERRED TO OtHER INSTI- 

TUTIOXS DURING THE YeAR 


Number 
remain- 
ing 


1 Total 


Died 


Dis- 
charged 


Trans- 
ferred 


April 1, 
1923 


Cities and towns 

State 


45,324 
15,540 


31,046 
10,504 


36,983 
16,469 


1,553 
593 


34,554 
15,181 


876 
695 


39,387 
9,575 


Totals 


60,864 


41,550 


53,452 


2,146 


49,735 


1,571 


48,962 



128 



P.D. 17, Part III. 



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130 



P.D. 17, Part III, 



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P.D. 17, Part III. 



131 



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P.D. 17, Part III 



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P.D. 17, Part III. 



133 



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$8,109 86 
243 96 

1,493 79 


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1 1 


Net 
Ordinary 
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$1,158 47 
59,849 67 

7.175 19 

9,280 85 
18,684 54 

2.375 10 
14.294 15 

6,506 13 
12 50 

1,019 55 
11,353 71 

3.709 23 
41.691 30 

5.519 12 

14.330 32 

690 68 

3.703 04 

17.670 91 

12.026 78 

320 40 

1,756 31 
28,375 56 
14,534 84 

1,533 27 

1.024 14 

6,793 48 


4,824 68 

8,349 35 

188 86 

22 67 


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828 00 
2.193 29 
4.095 94 
2,027 57 
3.745 19 
174 66 

2.978 19 
333 90 
9.642 73 
3,049 26 
3,531 54 

1,896 52 

4,753 70 

4,411 04 

37 47 

183 80 

18,133 94 

459 71 

901 37 

3,463 83 


1,416 37 

3,513 32 

136 28 


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On Ac- 
count of 
Support 
and 
Relief 
in Alms- 
houses 


$2,685 04 

718 67 

3,204 14 

414 15 

363 11 
192 54 

986 92 

2,015 61 
686 09 

1,127 60 
6,639 79 

6,373 46 
2,324 70 


2,426 51 
1,983 35 


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348 83 

72 00 


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$268 27 
70,575 20 
3,779 16 
7,112 42 
12,590 09 
1,562 35 
7,272 59 
1,773 45 

9,991 '48 

885 19 

26,477 24 

4,416 17 

9,801 73 

222 48 

2.728 41 

12.828 19 

13,215 31 

342 87 

486 26 

33.673 64 

10,519 98 

1,186 05 

1,301 34 

5,585 55 


2,171 49 

6,316 37 

98 14 

22 67 


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$1,520 13 
187 00 
309 00 
140 00 
1.307 07 
715 09 

211 00 

3.107 94 

1,459 55 

166 00 

786 00 

396 62 

1,771 25 

1,913 20 

597 25 

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30 22 

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2,829 71 
786 14 
441 21 
2,384 06 
1,083 25 
1,098 49 
1,455 75 

393 72 
3,361 42 

5,045 48 

5,005 22 

799 90 
1,704 89 

83 93 

2,476 21 

1,921 08 

118 00 

108 00 

1,340 03 


53 00 

486 78 

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$365 00 
12,949 43 
3,815 75 
6,732 15 
7,250 17 

7,013 25 
3,218 78 

1,101 75 
509 00 

18,687 13 

4,334 03 

398 43 

5,583 93 

9,133 30 

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682 67 

14,238 16 

1,389 62 

502 71 

4,846 33 


5,252 73 
6,694 04 


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$1,158 47 
92.699 13 

8,721 86 
14.678 28 
23,194 63 

4,402 67 
18,402 45 

6,873 33 
12 50 

2,006 47 
14,331 90 

4,043 13 
53,349 64 

9,254 47 

17,861 86 

690 68 

5,599 56 

23.552 21 

23.077 61 

357 87 

1.940 11 
52.882 96 
14,534 84 

1,992 98 

1,925 51 
12,582 01 


8,667 56 

13.846 02 

325 14 

22 67 


S8 

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00 


Grand 
Total 
Expend- 
itures 


$1,158 47 
92.699 13 

8.721 86 
14.678 28 
23.194 63 

4,402 67 

18,402 45 

14,983 19 

12 50 

2,006 47 
14,331 90 

4,043 13 
53,349 64 

9,498 43 

17,861 86 

690 68 

5,599 56 

23,854 94 

23.077 61 

357 87 

1,940 11 
54,376 75 
14,534 84 

1,992 98 

1,925 51 
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P.D. 17, Part III. 



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138 



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P.D. 17, Part III. 



139 



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INDEX. 



Adoptions . . 

Adult poor provided for in families, the settled .... 

AdNnsory Board, pre.sent members of ..... . 

Ages at death of certain infants ....... 

Aid and Relief, Division of . 

Subdivision of Mothers' Aid ....... 

See Mothers' Aid, Subdivision of. 

Subdivision of Settlements ....... 

See Settlements, Subdivision of. 

SubdiNision of Social Service ....... 

See Social Service, Subdivision of. 

Supervi.sion of wayfarers' lodges and public lodging houses 
Allowances, state, for funeral expon.ses of certain paupers increased . 
Almshouse department at State Farm, Bridgewater .... 
Almshouses, dependent minor children with settlement provided for in 
Almshouses, the city and town .... 

Closed 

Inspection of ...... 

Laws relating to . 

New ........ 

Recommendations made .... 

Visitors ....... 

Boarding houses for infants, licensed 

Boys' Parole ....... 

See Juvenile Training, Division of. 
Burials ........ 

Canton, Massachusetts Hospital School . 

Capacity of Institutions ..... 

Child Guardianship ...... 

Adoptions ....... 

Ages at death of infants .... 

Applications for discharge .... 

Children in care and custody of division . 

Children in custody during year, summary of all 

Children over three years of age 

Children over three years of age, summary of . 

Children under three years of age 

Children under three years of age, summary of 

Collections for support received from cities and towns and directly from parents 

Disposition by the courts of cases of delinquent and wayward children 

Disposition by the courts of neglected children 

Infant mortality, between one and three years 

Infant mortality, under one year 

Investigation, Subdivision of . 

Licensed boarding houses for infants 

Licensed lying-in hospitals 

Localities from which children are received 

Status of children over three years of age . 

Tuition of children under the care and control of the Department 

Results of departmental care of children ..... 
Children with settlement provided for in almshouses, dependent minor 
Children with settlement provided for outside of almshouses, dependent minor 
Cities and towns, penalty incurred for failure to make returns during the month of 

April, 1923 .... 
Cities and towns at work on zoning 
Cities and towns which have been zoned 
City and town poor, the 
Commissioner of Public Welfare, Report of 
County Training Schools, The 
Dangerous Diseases .... 
Death of certain infants, ages at 

Delinquent and wayward children, disposition by the courts of cases of 
Department of Public Welfare: 

Members of advisory board ....... 

Report of Commissioner ........ 

Department's finances, the ........ 

Dependent minor children; 

With settlement provided for in almshouses .... 

With settlement provided for outside of almshouses . 
Discharge, applications for . . . . 

Disposition by the courts of cases of delinquent and wayward children 
Disposition by the courts of cases of neglected children 
Division of Aid and Relief ........ 

See Aid and Relief, Division of. 



P.D. 17. 



143 



Division of Child Guardianship .... 

See Child Guardianship, Division of. 
Division of Juvenile Training .... 

See Juvenile Training, Division of. 
Essex County Training School, Lawrence 
Finances, the department's ..... 
Financial supervision of institutions 

See Institutions. 
Five institutions ....... 

Funeral expenses of certain paupers, state allowance for, increased 
Girls' Parole ....... 

See Juvenile Training, Division of. 
Hampden County Training School, Springfield 
Hospital School at Canton, Massachusetts 
Hospitals, licensed lying-in ..... 
Housing and Town Planning, Di\'ision of 

Cities and towns at work on zoning 

Cities and towns which have been zoned . 

Housing experiment at Lowell 

Progress in planning ..... 

Zoning ........ 

Industrial School for Boys, Shirley 

Industrial School for Girls, the State, Lancaster 

Infant mortality ....... 

Infants, Licensed boarding houses for 

Infants under two years of age, summary of 

Infants with sore eyes discharged from lying-in hospitals 

Institutional supervision ..... 

Institutions ....... 

Almshouse Department of State Farm, Bridgewater 

Capacity, population and inventory 

County Training Schools .... 

Financial supervision of institutions 

Analysis of payroll ..... 

Expenditures ...... 

Inventory ....... 

Maintenance, net weekly per capita cost 
Receipts ....... 

Industrial School for Boys, Shirley . 

Lyman School for Boys, Westborough 

Massachusetts Hospital School, Canton 

State Industrial School for Girls, Lancaster 

State Infirmary, Tewksbury .... 
See State Infirmary. 
Investigation, subdivision of . 
Investigation of advisability of providing a limitation of exemptions from local taxation 

on certain property ..... 
Juvenile Training, Division of ... . 

Boys' Parole Branch ..... 

Girls' Parole Branch ..... 
Lancaster, State Industrial School for Girls 
Laws affecting the Department passed by the Legislature of 1923 

An Act changing the name of the Overseers of the Poor in certain cities and 
to the Board of Public Welfare 

An Act relative to the reimbursement of cities and towns for expenses 
transporting certain paupers to the State Infirmary 

An Act increasing the state allowance for the funeral expenses of certain paupers 

An Act authorizing the State Board of Vocational Education to furnish aid during 
rehabilitation to certain persons 

Resolve relative to investigation of the advisability of providing a limitation from 
local taxation of certain property 
Licensed boarding houses for infants 
Localities from which new children are received 
Lying-in hospitals, licensed ..... 
Lyman School for Boys, Westborough 
Massachusetts Hospital School, Canton . 
Members of Advisory Board .... 

Misslesex County Training School, North Chelmsford 
Mothers' Aid, Subdivision of .... 

Reasons for closing Mothers' Aid cases 

Ten Years of, in Massachusetts 

State appropriations to date .... 

Duration of Mothers' Aid cases 

Statistics ....... 

Neglected Children, disposition of, by the court 

Norfolk, Bristol, and Plymouth Union Training School, Waltham 



towns 



curred in 



4, 17 

6,23 

53 

60- 

44 

38 

58 
34 

53 
43 
30 
35 
37 
36 
37 
35 
36 
41 
42 
18 
28 
29 
31 
44 
38 
39 
44 
53 
44 
51 
47 
44 
49 
45 
41 
39 
43 
42 
38 

22 

57 
6,33 
34 
34 
42 
57 

57 

57 

58 

58 

59 
28 
28 
30 
39 
43 
1 
53 
10 
13 
10 
14 
14 
12 
27 
53 



144 



P.D. 17. 



transporting certain paupers 



Overseers of the Poor of certain cities and towns, name changed to Board of Public 
Welfare ...... 

Past memlxTs of State Board of Charity 

Poor relief, returns of. penalty for failure to make 

Poor relief, statistics of 

Private chjirities ....... 

Progress in planning ...... 

Reimbursement of cities and towns for expenses incurred in 
to the State Infirmary .... 

Report of the C'onmiissioner of Public Welfare 

Settled poor relieved or supported by cities and towns, support of . 

City and town poor .......... 

Dependent minor children with settlement provided for in almshouses 

Dependent minor children with settlement provided for outside of almshouses 

Penalty of certain cities and towns for failure to make their returns during the 
month of April, 1923 .... 

Settled adult poor provided for in families 
Settlements, Subdivision of . 

Audit 

Burials ....... 

Dangerous diseases ..... 

Removals ....... 

Sliipwrecked seamen ..... 

Sick State Poor 

Temporary aid ...... 

Wife settlement ...... 

Shirley, Industrial School for Boys 

Sick State Poor 

Social Service, Subdivision of .... 

Court work ....... 

General summary ...... 

Summary of placement work .... 

W'omen and children admitted to the State Infirmary during the year ending 

November 30, 1923 

State Board for Vocational Education to furnish aid during rehabilitation to certain 
persons ....... 

State Farm, Bridgewater, Almshouse department at 
State Industrial School for Girls at Lancaster . 
State Infirmary, Tewksbury ..... 

Statistics of Poor Relief ..... 

Cost 

Numbers relieved ...... 

Subdivision of Investigation . . . ... 

Subdivision of Mothers' Aid ..... 

Subdivision of Settlements ..... 

Subdivision of Social Service .... 

Summary of persons under the supervision of the department, showing apportionment 
of visitors to persons ....... 

Super\nsion of institutions . 

Supervision of the settled poor relieved or supported by cities and towns 
Supervision of wayfarers' lodges and public lodging houses 
Temporary Aid .......... 

Ten years of Mothers' Aid in Massachusetts ..... 

Tewksbury, State Infirmary ........ 

Town Planning, Housing and ....... 

Training Schools, County ........ 

State 

Tuition of children under the care and control of the department 
Visitors, apportionment of, to persons supervised .... 

Wayfarers' lodges and public lodging houses, supervision of 
Westborough, Lyman School for Boys ...... 

Wife-settlement .......... 

Worcester County Training School, Oakdale (West Boylston) 



57 
1 
57 
119 
64 
35 

57 
2 
53 
55 
56 
56 

57 

55 

7 

9 

9 

9 

10 

9 

9 

8 

9 

41 

9 

14 

17 

16 

16 

15 



58 

39 

42 

38 

119 

121, 132 

119, 122 

22 

10 

7 

14 



3 

44 

55 

8 

8 

10 

38 

35 

53 

39 

32 

3 

8 

39 

9 

53 



Public Document No. 17 

tB^t Commontuealtti of Maisathviietts ^, 



ANNUAL REPORT 



DEPARTMENT 



Public Welfare 



Year ending Novemrer 30, 1924 




Publication op this Document approved by the Commission on Administration and Finance 
2M 9-'25 Order 2840 \ 



_J 


11 zi 




■mU 


-^ 






PAST MEMBERS OF THE STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. 


Date of Original 








Appointment 


Name 


Residence 


Retired 


June 7, 1879 


Moses Kimball . . . . 


Boston . 


October 27, 1880 


June 7, 1879 


Nathan Allen, M.D. 


Lowell . 


June 7, 1880 


June 7, 1879 


Henry I. Bowditch, M.D. 


Boston . 


January 24, 1880 


June 7, 1879 


Charles F. Donnelly 


Boston 


June 7, 1907 


June 7, 1879 


Edward Hitchcock, M.D. 


Amherst . 


June 7, 1906 


June 7, 1879 


Albert Wood, M.D. 


Worcester 


June 7, 1880 


June 7, 1879 


Robert T. Davis, M.D. . 


Fall River 


January 22, 1884 


June 7, 1879 


John C. Hoadley . . . . 


Lawrence 


November 16, 1882 


June 7, 1879 


Ezra Parmenter, M.D. . 


Cambridge 


February 1883 


January 27, 1880 


David L. Webster 


Boston . 


April 11, 1881 


June 8, 1880 


Charles F. Folsom, M.D. 


Boston . 


January 14, 1881 


June 8, 1880 


Clara T. Leonard 


Springfield 


March 19, 1886 


November 5, 1880 


Thomas Talbot . . . . 


BiUerica . 


March 12, 1884 


January 22, 1881 


Alfred Hosmer, M.D. . 


Watertown 


December 4, 1882 


April 18, 1881 


George P. Carter . . . . 


Cambridge 


June 7, 1883 


November 23, 1882 


John Fallon . . . . 


Lawrence 


December 15, 1889 


December 8, 1882 


Henry P. Walcott, M.D. 


Cambridge 


June 7, 1885 


February 14, 1883 


Albert A. Haggett 


Lowell . 


October 26, 1885 


May 31, 1883 


Reuben Noble 


Westfield 


June 16, 1885 


July 18, 1883 


Edgar E. Dean, M.D. . 


Brockton 


December 1, 1887 


March 19, 1884 


Everett Torrey 


Boston . 


August 16, 1886 


June 16, 1885 


Charles A. Denny 


Leicester 


November 4, 1889 


July 16, 1885 


Samuel A. Green, M.D. 


Boston . 


May 15, 1886 


April 14, 1886 


Anne B. Richardson 


LoweU . 


January 26, 1899 


April 21, 1886 


Henrietta G. Codman . 


Brookline 


May 16, 1906 


December 22, 1886 


Richard L. Hodgdon, M.D. . 


Arlington 


January 30, 1893 


December 22, 1886 


Charles C. Coffin . 


Boston . 


December 17, 1889 


January 25, 1888 


D. Webster King . 


Boston . 


August 5, 1889 


December 4, 1889 


George W. Johnson 


Brookfield 


September 1, 1903 


December 24, 1889 


. Henry Stone 


Boston . 


January 1, 1894 


December 24, 1889 


Laban Pratt 


Boston . 


June 7, 1909 


January 1, 1890 


Ziba C. Keith 


Brockton 


June 11, 1891 


June 11, 1891 


Charles J. Curran, M.D. 


North Adams . 


June 7, 1896 


June 22, 1893 


Richard M. Hodges, M.D. 


Boston . 


January 1, 1895 


February 15, 1894 


Leontine Lincoln . 


Fall River 


November 30, 1919 


February 14, 1895 


John L. Hildreth, M.D. 


Cambridge 


July 2, 1898 


June 4, 1896 


Edward H. Haskell 


Newton . 


November 2, 1897 


November 16, 1897 


Jabez Fox .... 


Cambridge 


September 5, 1900 


June 22, 1898 


Henry S. Nourse . 


Lancaster 


November 14, 1903 


July 7, 1898 


James M. Pullman, D.D. 


Lynn 


November 22, 1903 


February 23, 1899 


Annette P. Rogers 


Boston . 


December 15, 1899 


December 13, 1899 


Frances Greely Curtis . 


Boston . 


September 3, 1915 


August 7, 1903 


Joseph Walker . 


Brookline 


January 16, 1904 


December 9, 1903 


Charles H. Adams 


Melrose . 


November 30, 1919 


December 9, 1903 


David F. Tilley . 


Boston . 


August 17, 1915 


January 14, 1904 


Charles R. Johnson 


Worcester 


November 30, 1919 


June 6, 1906 


Abraham C. Ratshesky . 


Boston . 


_ — 


June 20, 1906 


Jeffrey R. Brackett 


Boston . 


_ - 


June 12, 1907 


Thomas Downey . 


Boston . 


June 27, 1917 


June 16, 1909 


Ada Eliot Sheffield 


Cambridge 


December 31, 1914 


December 30, 1914 


Mary A. Barr 


Boston . 


November 30, 1919 


August 11, 1915 


Robert M. Merrick, M.D. 


Boston . 


November 30, 1919 


August 11, 1915 


Charlotte J. Guild 


Boston . 


August 1, 1916 


November 29, 1916 


Katharine H. Leonard . 


Springfield 


November 30, 1919 


June 20, 1917 


B. Preston Clark . 


Cohasset 


November 30, 1919 



PRESENT MEMBERS OF THE ADVISORY BOARD OF THE DEPART- 
^ MENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. 

Br Ex Officio, Richard K. Conant, Commissioner, 

37 State House, Boston. 













Term expires 


December 
December 
December 
December 
December 
December 




1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 


Abraham C. Ratshesky 
Jeffrey R. Brackett 
George Crompton 
George 11. McClean 
Mrs. Ada Eliot Sheffield 
Mrs. Mary P. H. Sherburne 


Boston . 

Boston . 

Worcester 

Springfield 

Cambridge 

Brookline 


December 1, 1925 
December 1, 1925 
. December 1, 1927 
December 1, 1927 
December 1, 1926 
December 1, 1926 



'J^. 



2 P.D. 17. 

Part I. 
Report of the Commissioner of Public Welfare. 

To the Honorable Senate and House of Representatives. 

The Fifth Ann\ial Report of the Department of PubUc Welfare, covering the 
year from December 1, 1923, to November 30, 1924, is herewith respectfully pre- 
sented. 

The State Department of Public Welfare has the following principal duties: 

1. Sup". vision over the five state institutions of the Department: 

State Infirmary, Tewksburj^ 
Alassachusetts Hospital School, Canton 
Lyman School for Boys, Westborough 
Industrial School for Boys, Shirley 
State Industrial School for Girls, Lancaster 

2. Direction of public relief, both indoor and outdoor, given to unsettled persons 
by cities and towns. 

3. Supervision of mothers' aid rendered by cities and towns. 

4. Care and maintenance of delinquent, neglected and dependent children coming 
into the custody of the Department through court commitment or other\\ise. 

5. Institutional custod}^ and treatment of juvenile offenders committed by the 
courts to the three State Training Schools, and the care of these children in 
families when on parole. 

6. General supervision of the" work of the city and town Planning Boards. 

7. Visitation and inspection of private incorporated charitable agencies; investi- 
gation of petitions for thC' incorporation of private charities; and the require- 
ment and reception of annual returns from them. 

Among the other super\'isory and inspectional duties of the Department may be 
mentioned the following: 

1. Visitation and inspection of city and towTi almshouses. 

2. Visitation and inspection of the five county training schools. 

3. Visitation and investigation of care given to all children supported by the 
several cities and towns. 

4. Visitation and investigation of care given to all adults supported in families, 
other than their own, by cities and towns. 

5. Reception and classification of the annual returns of cities and towns relative 
to poor persons supported and reheved and the cost thereof. 

6. Visitation and inspection of waj^arers' lodges and public lodging houses. 

7. Investigation of legal settlement of persons, possibly State charges, who have 
been supported, relieved or buried by cities and towns, and of sane inmates 
of State institutions. 

8. Sending poor persons to the places within and without the Commonwealth 
where they belong. 

9. Execution of the laws concerning infants and the Hcensing of infant boarding 
houses. 

10. Licensing maternity hospitals. 

The following general principles upon which the work of the Department is 
based may serve to explain the detailed reports found in this volume. 
I. The successful administration of relief measures depends largely upon careful 

investigation and individual case treatment. 
11. Specialization of effort in the various forms of public welfare work makes 
necessary the extensive use of trained workers. 

III. Programs formerly stressing institutional care have been replaced by a much 
larger use of probation, parole, foster home care and relief in the home, with 
discriminating use of institutions when necessary. 

IV. Close cooperation between pubUc and private agencies is essential so that 
each may take care of that portion of the entire field for which it is best suited. 

V. Preventive measures result from a careful study of good individual case 
treatment. 



Pt. I. 3 

Instead of the sj'stem which is sometimes thought to exist, the system of relief 
funds being dispensed, upon application, to all persons who represent themselves 
to be in need, a study of the Department's records shows the operation of the prin- 
ciple of case investigation and individual treatment. In our Division of Aid and 
Rehef, as soon as the problem of distress arises, a trained worker is sent to de- 
termine what form and what amount of aid is necessary and what plan can be 
made for restoring the family to a self-supporting basis and preventing further 
distress. The work of the visitors was described in detail in our last annual report. 

The careful supervision and planning in each case, with discrimination as to 
the aid extended, is more useful than tlie giving of a fixed amount of financial aid 
without such individual case work. XAny system of old age pensions, pensions for 
the bhnd, pensions for the handicapped, or pensions for any particular class of 
disadvantaged persons would tend to substitute for the present intelligent and 
modern system of pubhc welfare administration the wholesale method of the dole^^^^ 
The present sj'stem, with its individual treatment, recognizes the obUgation of 
society to help adequately the person who actuall}^ needs help and to help him 
according to his particular requirements. 

The scheme of welfare demands close cooperation between public and private 
rehef agencies in their service to people who are in real need. A good example 
of a simple working agreement which covers a few essential points of mutual 
understanding between public and private agencies in regard to family welfare 
work is that of Pittsfield, Some other cities have similar understandings. The 
public authorities of Pittsfield refer to the private agencies all new applicants 
who have never received public rehef. The private agency then makes the first 
investigation; in many cases finds a plan which wdll prevent pubhc rehef; in other 
cases finds a l ong time nee d which the pubhc can best meet. A second point in 
the unwTitten working agreement is that the records of the pubhc and the private 
agencies are open to each other, and information is freely exchanged when it will 
help in the proper treatment of a person in need. This form of cooperation is 
strengthened by maldng the pubhc official a member of the board of directors of 
the private agenc}*. Understandings frequently exist between public agencies 
and private health agencies such as visiting nurse associations, so that the pubhc 
cases get the benefit of the service of the private agency, and the private agency 
refers needy cases to the pubhc authorities. In small places a single nurse is 
sometimes employed b}' the public and private agencies jointty. 

In the field of child placing, as well as in the field of relief or famih' weKare, close 
cooperation between pubhc and private agencies is essential. A simple working 
agreement is desirable. Mutual understanding upon certain essential features is 
helpful even though a formal agreement is not arrived at. For example, in New- 
Bedford the pubhc agencj- sends to the private child placing agency those cases 
which can be handled better privately, cases needing temporarj' or special care. 
The child placing agency refers to the Overseers all cases needing longer care, and 
to our Division of Child Guardianship all cases which are likel}- to be of still longer 
duration and where care for an indefinite period is necessar^^ As a result of this 
plan, not for two years has a child been placed in the New Bedford almshouse. 

There are many other places in the state where the same agreement exists or is 
beginning to be developed so that children do not have to be sent to the almshouses 
for temporary care, and the private and pubhc agencies cooperate, each doing those 
things for which it is best adapted. 

In the public care of children, under our Division of Child Guardianship, the 
number at the end of the fiscal year — 5,384 — shows a slight decrease of 166 from 
last year. The number received during the year — 767 — shows a decrease of 
61 from last j-ear. During the year the temporary home at Wellesley Hills has 
been abandoned, emphasizing the third general principle stated upon page 2 
and making the foster home more than ever the method of care which the state 
uses for dependent and neglected children. 

The Massachusetts Hospital School has continued to render its priceless service 
in curing by means of exercise, correctional apparatus, sunlight and good habits of 
living those children who would otherwise remain bedridden cripples. Its great 
need is for a separate school builchng to replace the scattered school rooms which 
are inadequate. Bradford Infirmar}"-, the new hospital building at the Hospital 



4 P.D. 17. 

School, has cared for 442 state wards during the year and has rendered exceptional 
service in the cure of skin chseases and venereal diseases. 

At the three training schools, — at Lancaster, Westborough and Shirley — the 
progress of non-institutional. care in probation and parole has left as children for 
whom institution care is deemed necessary many boys and girls who are far below 
normal mentally. In this Division of Juvenile Training and in the Division of 
Child Guardianship the clinics of the schools for the feeble-minded have been of 
great assistance to our visitors and superintendents in advising about the abilities 
of the children, their mental needs and dangers and the work which they should 
be encouraged to do. The death of Dr. \Valter E. Fernald, Superintendent of 
the ^Massachusetts School for the Feeble-IMinded, occurred during the year. It 
was a great loss to us as well as to his own department and to the world. Just 
before his death Dr. Fernald had completed a study of all the children at the 
three training schools which gave the superintendents information of great assist- 
ance to them in regard to the individual children. This valuable study will form 
the basis of securing more extended psychiatric service for the Department, and 
this piece of Dr. Fernald's work, hke his entire life's service, will be of inestimable 
benefit to all who henceforth come under the sj^stem which he has established. 

The advertising of crime has increased to such an extent in conjunction with 
the automobile's enlargement of the opportunitj'' for misdeeds and for escape that 
the boy on parole has become a greater problem. Our parole visitation must 
be made more strict, and the staff of visitors to boj^s should be increased. 

At the State Infirmary the addition of fifteen new wards in the last three years 
has helped to brighten the lives of the patients, especially the old people with 
chronic diseases. An experiment has been made during the year in social service 
for men at the Infirmary. Hitherto social service has been confined to the women's 
side. Social service for men has proved its value to the patients, the nurses, and 
the physicians and is very popular. It has demonstrated that many patients 
can be made happier and more comfortable while at the Infirmar}^ bj'^ special at- 
tention to their social needs, their family ties and their friendships. It has demon- 
strated that men can be placed out from the Infirmar}- who would otherwise, in 
such a great institution, have been overlooked and would have stayed on unknown 
and uncared for except as to their ph}'sical condition. It has demonstrated that 
often a better plan can be made for a man than to leave him at the State Infirm- 
ary. To help these men to a more comfortable and a happier existence and to 
restore such as can be restored to positions of self-support and self-respect are 
achievements such as the State should constanth^ expect. 

P^urthermore, the men who do not need to go to the State Infirmary should be 
prevented from going there. 

The statutes give the Department no discretion as to who may be admitted to 
the State Infirmar}'. When it was an almshouse maintained l^y the State as a 
means of stopping outdoor relief, it was appropriate that cities and to\\Tis be 
directed to send all unsettled cases to it. There was little fear that people would 
go to an almshouse when they had no need to go. Now that the institution has 
become a well equipped infirmary, the situation has changed. Middle-aged, able- 
bodied men use it for a winter's lodging. It is impossible to operate a lodging 
house and an infirmary successfully in the same buildings. The crowding of these 
men into double decked beds in the same building with aged and infirm men to 
whom we are trjdng to give a higher standard of care, the food lines in which the 
able-bodied elbow the aged men and crowd the dining-rooms where we should 
provide the aged men T\ith a better quality of food, the work squads where it is 
ver}^ difficult to separate those who ought to be worked hard from those who are 
infirm, — all these problems are too difficult to be handled in the buildings of an 
Infirmary. 

Some hope of remedj^ lies in providing a more careful investigation of the need 
for institutional care at the local offices where the applicants are first received. 
For this purpose the Department has asked for the power of approval of patients 
sent to the Infirmary. 

Encouraging progress in preventive measures appears in the extraordinarily 
rapid spread of the zoning movement. During the yescr twelve cities and towns 
were zoned, making a total of twenty-four places in Massachusetts which separate 



Pt. I. 5 

the industrial development in cities from the growth of living quarters and make 
the fundamental living conditions more healthful. Ten planning boards have 
been established in 1924 making now seventy-three active planning boards in the 
State, devoted to matters like the development of adecjuate breathing spaces for 
the population, the orderly arrangement of transportation facilities and similar 
features of citj^ development which will have a direct effect upon the welfare of 
the people. 

With no chance to pubhsh abstracts of reports of private agencies, our work has 
been seriously crippled. The basis of our supervision of private agencies, the 
structure of it built up through twenty-one years, was publicity given to the finan- 
cial accounting and to the work accompiislied by those agencies. The supervision 
of charitable corporations is a different sort of activity from the supervision of 
stock selling corporations: the State has never imposed such severe restrictions 
upon charitable corporations, but has gained its end by supervising them in an 
educational way, assuming that most of the people who desired to incorporate 
had unselfish motives and were above suspicion. 

So, by publicity of a not very widespread but a very effective kind,, the affairs 
of the private corporations were made known to each other and to many of the 
subscribing and supporting public in a way which. resulted in a wholesome super- 
vision. Since the publication of the reports has been prevented, we have felt 
the loss of a very great power in this work which people expect us to do in pro- 
tecting the pubUc asfainst fraudulent or mismanaged charities. 

RICHARD K. COXAXT, 

Commissioner. 

DIVISION OF AID AND RELIEF. 

Frank W. Goodhue, Director. 

Subdivision of Settlements. 

Edward F. ^Morgan, Supervisor. 

The Subdivision of Settlements investigates the legal settlement of all persons 
officially called to the attention of the division by overseers of the poor and boards 
of health; investigates the settlement of patients admitted to the State Infirmary, 
State Farm (almshouse department), State Sanatoria and the ^Massachusetts 
Hospital School; and super\'ises public rehef rendered in homes and in hospitals 
by cities and towns to persons without legal settlement. The subdivision also 
discharges male inmates of the State Infirmarj^ and the State Farm (almshouse 
department), visits poor persons supported bj' cities and towns in families, and 
investigates, upon request of the state board for vocational education, the circum- 
stances of persons receiving vocational training, who apply for aid during re- 
habilitation. 

The following table is a summary of the work done during the year in the exami- 
nation and investigation of settlements of inmates of the State institutions: 













Orders 


Total 




Examina- 


Orders 


Settlement 


s No 


With- 


Cases 




tions 


Issued 


Found 


Settlements 


drawn 


Returned 


State Infirmary 


. 2,767 


694 


446 


147 


15 


608 


State Farm .... 


248 


73 


51 


8 


2 


61 


Lakeville State Sanatorium 


302 


185 


163 


14 


- 


177 


North Reading State Sanatorium 


286 


218 


197 


14 


— 


211 


Rutland State Sanatorium 


352 


306 


296 


19 


_ 


315 


Westfield State Sanatorium 


291 


236 


211 


24 


_ 


235 


Massachusetts Hospital School 


55 


55 


42 


9 


- 


51 


Totals .... 


. 4,301 


1,767 


1,406 


235 


17 


1,658 



Cases pending Nov. 30, 1923: 575. 
Cases pending Nov. 30, 1924: 684. 



Supervision of Wayfarers' Lodges and Public Lodging Houses. — Acting under 
the provisions of General Laws, chapter 121, sections 7, 20. and 21, the Depart- 
ment of Public Welfare visits and inspects annually all the wayfarers' lodges and 



6 P.D. 17. 

public lodging houses wherein the cost is twenty-five cents per night or less, and 
where at least ten beds are provided. 

The commercial lodging house, — that is, the house not supported by a charit- 
able agency, — but maintained as a business proposition, — exists only in Boston. 
The number of these establishments has steadily decreased in recent j^ears as has 
also the number of beds in the remaining houses. Local supervision and inspec- 
tion by the Board of Health is provided by law and ordinance and is adequate to 
maintain a good standard of cleanliness. Recently the Boston Board of Health 
has made regulations against the use of the double-decked bed in commercial 
lodging houses. This has been a move in the interest of better conditions although 
it may be a hardship upon the proprietors of these lodging houses who come into 
direct competition with those houses maintained by various charitable corpora- 
tions. 

It seems well to speak of the good work done by the various Men's Missions 
aside from the lodging feature of the organization. In many instances work is 
obtained and follow-up methods practiced. If a proper working agreement exists 
between the local Mission lodging house and other city welfare agencies, a full 
benefit is derived. Such an agreement is working wonderfully well in New Bedford. 

The two municipal lodging houses in Boston and Springfield continue. During 
the past year both of them have served as locations for work tests and have pro- 
vided employment for men temporarily out of work whose families are cared for 
by the outdoor poor department. 

Temporary Aid {G. L., ch. 117, sect. 18, as amended by ch. 221, Acts of 1924). — 
Cities and towns are authorized by statute to furnish adequate assistance to poor 
persons having no lawful settlements, if so ordered by the Department of Public 
^^'elfa^e. 

On December 1, 1923, there were 1,292 continued cases including 5,302 persons, 
and during the 3'ear 4,473 notices were received from 209 cities and towns concern- 
ing 21,977 persons. 



Causes of Aid. 



1922 1923 1924 



Illness .... 

Desertion .... 
"Widowhood 

Old age .... 

Unemployment 
Insufficient income 
Husband in House of Correc- 
tion .... 



947 1,070 1,026 



295 

136 

37 

1,890 

987 



359 364 

205 213 

69 77 

829 2,097 

249 343 



134 143 



228 



Orphans 
Insanity 
Blindness 
Non-support . 
Miscellaneous 

Totals . 



1922 


1923 


1924 


16 


12 


11 


16 


24 


24 


3 


6 


17 


17 


47 


54 


7 


5 


19 


. 4,485 


3,018 


4,473 



The large increase in the number of notices received during the year is due 
principall}^ to unemploj'ment. 

The number of active cases at the end of the year, approximately 35% greater 
than on December 1, 1923, indicates no improvement in industrial conditions. 

Desertion and non-support is still the cause of dependency in a large number 
of cases. 

During the year two important changes were made in the temporary aid law. 
Under the old law, overseers of the poor could not give temporary aid to unsettled 
persons for a greater amount than two dollars a week for each family during the 
months of ^Isij to September, inclusive, or three dollars a week during the other 
months, except as otherwise ordered bj'- the Department of Public Welfare. The 
law, as amended, authorizes overseers to furnish such temporary assistance as 
they deem necessary pending investigation by the Department of Public Welfare 
which shall then order such aid as it deems expedient. The provision requiring 
overseers to give immediate written notice to this Department was also amended 
so as to provide that overseers shall give written notice within five days. 



12,339 


$48,192 85 


13,434 


63,203 05 


20,714 


108.337 29 


32,056 


178,611 62 


21,043 


159,205 53 


22,258 


227,766 71 


17,701 


261,089 14 


15,668 


310,468 78 


13,313 


b33,873 30 


32,372 


624,572 32 


29,124 


555,227 08 


19,370 


368,272 40 



Pt. I. 7 

The amounts annually appropriated by the Legislature are necessarily for cur- 
rent and previous years. The following tabulation shows the actual amounts re- 
imbursed for aid rendered by cities and towns during the years designated: 

Number of 
Year Number of Persons in Amounts 

Cases Families Reimbursed 

1912 2,847 

1913 3,131 

1914 4,848 

1915 7,305 

1916 5,165 

1917 5,664 

1918 4,358 

1919 3,756 

1920 3,223 

1921 8,093 

1922 6,472 

1923 4,320 

The amount reimbursed for aid rendered in 1924 (8103,450.93) is not included 
in the above tabulation as the claims for the last six months of the year are not 
received until after the close of the fiscal year, as provided by chapter 122, section 
19, General Laws. 

Shipwrecked Seamen {G. L., ch. 102, sect. 5). — During the year there were two 
notices received, one from Chatham which included 10 persons, and the other 
from Nantucket which included 6 persons. 

Sick State Poor {G. L., ch. 122, sects. 17, 18). — The sick law pro\ddes that no 
person shall be sent to the State Infirmary whose health would be endangered by 
removal. 

Cities and towns are reimbursed for the support of persons haA^ing no legal 
settlement who are ill in their homes or in pubhc or privately controlled hospitals, 
infirmaries, or institutions for the deaf, dumb, or blind, provided such persons are 
not in suitable condition for removal to the State Infirmary when applying for 
assistance. 

On December 1, 1923, there were 163 continued cases, and during the yesn notices 
were received from 132 cities and to^sTis concerning 5,960 persons represented as 
too ill to be removed. 

Dangerous Diseases {G. L., ch. Ill, sect. 116). — The law provides that a board 
of health shall retain charge, to the exclusion of the overseers of the poor, of any 
person ill with a disease defined by the Department of PubUc Health as dangerous 
to the pubhc health. 

If any member of a family is ill \\'ith a disease declared dangerous to the public 
health, the aid required by the other members of the family is furnished by the 
overseers of the poor, unless the family is quarantined as provided in chapter 111, 
section 95, General Laws, in which event the board of health furnishes all aid 
required. 

In hospital cases reimbursement by the commonwealth is governed by the pro- 
visions of chapter 122, section 18, General Laws. 

On December 1, 1923, there were 365 continued cases, and during the j^ear notices 
were received from the boards of health of 98 cities and towns concerning 2,592 
persons ill with diseases declared dangerous to the public health. 

Wife-settlement (G. L., ch. 122, sect, i^). — The law provides that 'Tf a State 
pauper has a \\dfe who is also a pauper having a legal settlement in the common- 
wealth he shall be supported by the town where his wife has her settlement." 

On December 1, 1923, there were 71 continued cases, and during the year 347 
notices were received from 43 cities and towns. 

Burials (G. L., ch. 117, sect. 17, as amended by chap. 298, Acts of 1923). — The 
law provides that if the expense of burial is not paid by kindred, — "An amount 
not exceeding 840 for the funeral expenses of each pauper over 12 years of age, 
and not exceeding 820 for the funeral expenses of each pauper under that age, 
shall be paid by the commonwealth; provided, that the overseers shall file with. 
each claim an affidavit of the undertaker stating the total amount of his bill, the 
amount received from the town, and the amount received from all other sources, 



8 P.D. 17. 

and provided, further, that if the total expense of the burial, by whomsoever in- 
curred, shall exceed the sum of SlOO no payment therefor shall be made by the 
commonwealth." 

The nmnber of burial claims received during the year was 241 from 61 cities and 
towns. 

Vocational Education {G. L., ch. 7.$, sect. 22B). — The law provides that upon 
request of the State Board for Vocational Education the Department of Public 
Welfare shall make an investigation of the circumstances of persons actually in 
training afforded by said Board, who apply for aid during rehabiUtation, and that 
the Department shall make a report of its findings to said Board. 

This act was approved IVIay 22, 1923. The first apphcation was referred by 
the State Board for Vocational Education December 11, 1923. Five applications 
were received and investigated during the year. Three were approved by this 
Department and two were disapproved. 

Audit. — The number, amount, and allowance of the bills examined on account 
of cases of temporarj^ aid, sick state poor, dangerous diseases, wife-settlement, 
burial, and mothers with dependent children are shown in the following tabula- 
tion. It is to be noted that the total shown in this table may vary somewhat 
from the total paid out of the Treasury during the fiscal j'ear from the appropria- 
tion in question. This possible variance arises from the fact that bills audited by 
this Department are in some cases not actually paid during the year for which 
the audit is shown. For actual expenditures from these respective appropriations 
see pages 54 and 55. 

Classes of Cases Bills Claim3 Allowances Deduction 

Temporar>' -•^d 

Sick State Poor 

Dangerous Diseases 

Wife-settlement . 

Burial 

Mothers with Dependent Children 



Removals. — The Department is charged with the dutj'' of removing sane poor 
persons to cities and towns within the State, or, when not belonging in Massachu- 
setts, to the State or place where they do belong. The following table shows the 
removals made during the year: 

1922 1923 1924 

To other countries 135 67 80 

To other States 198 161 180 

To towns of residence 1,648 1,163 1,594 



4,939 


S542,479 77 


§499,999 57 


S42,480 20 


2,886 


78,902 65 


65.176 32 


13,726 33 


2,108 


172,345 23 


144,999 06 


27,346 17 


295 


10,201 66 


9,823 51 


381 15 


375 


9,189 43 


7,997 28 


1,192 15 


6,175 


963,433 03 


949.999 97 


13,433 06 


16,778 


$1,776,554 77 


§1,677,995 71 


§98,559 06 



1,981 1,391 1.854 



Subdivision of Mothers' Aid. 

(General Laws, chapter 118.) 
Mrs. Elizabeth F. Moloney, Supervisor. 

Mothers' Aid is relief with a plan. The Massachusetts law is unique in that it 
prescribes no per capita amount of aid; neither does it establish minimum or 
maximum family allowances. The only reference to the amount of aid is found 
in Section II: 'The aid furnished such mothers shall be sufficient to enable them 
to bring up their children properly in their own homes." 

In order to determine what is a sufficient amount of aid for a given family, a 
thorough investigation of its circumstances is necessary. Much depends upon the 
thoroughness of this inquiry. The resources of the family, including help which 
may be secured from relatives and interested societies, must be discovered, as well 
as the needs of the family in terms of food, clothing, rent, fuel, etc. 

With all of the facts in mind, a constructive family plan should be formulated. 



Pt. I. 9 

The mother's advice and preferences should be given due consideration. Unless 
she understands and accepts the plan as a reasonable and proper rule of Hving, 
her cooperation and support in following out the plan cannot be expected. 

Each family has its own special problems which demand individual attention. 
It is not possible to classify all the mothers with three children into one group and 
allot to them a flat rate of aid per family. Not only the number of individuals in 
the family, but also the age, the health, the special needs, the capabilities and the 
handicaps of each member must be known. The former standards of living of 
the family, its racial food habits and the ability of the mother to cook and sew 
for the children, to keep her house clean, and to manage her income wisely, count 
for much. It is important that the mother should be able to discipline her chil- 
dren and to command their respect and obedience. 

While it is true that the best results are usually obtained in families which have 
always maintained good standards of living, there are man}^ instances of remarkable 
improvement made by mothers of rather doubtful standards when a real oppor- 
tunity for improvement has been extended to them. 

Not all of the famihes have made such decided gains as the families here de- 
scribed. In every one of the cases quoted the mother was a woman of ability and 
good character who made good use of the financial help, the free medical care, and 
the sympathetic oversight afforded her under the Mothers' Aid law. 

Case No. 1. 

In April, 1917, when Mr. 0., an Itahan laborer, was sent to the Mattapan Hos- 
pital as a third stage tuberculosis case, Mrs. 0. applied to the Boston Overseers 
for Mothers' Aid for herself and eight children, five boys and three girls. The 
oldest boy was just 14 years of age; the babj^ girl was 16 months old. 

The family lived in three rooms on the second floor of a three-tenement house 
in a typical North End street, narrow, dirty, and noisy. 

Mr. 0. had been ill for some time and the entire family had been exposed to 
tuberculosis. The mother and all of the children were therefore examined at the 
Tuberculosis CHnic where Mrs. 0. and the three oldest boys were found to be 
suspicious tuberculosis cases and they were placed under strict supervision. One 
boy, 11 years old, was sent to Westfield. Two of the younger children were 
treated for discharging ears. 

The Overseers gave the family $12 cash, and one of the boys earned about fifty 
cents on Saturday afternoons shining shoes. 

Upon the State Visitor's recommendation. Mothers' Aid was increased to $18 
a week. The Tuberculosis Society gave the family three quarts of milk per day. 
It was understood that this family should move, but there was great difficulty in 
finding a suitable place. Finally, the family was moved to a five-room cottage 
on the top of a hill on the outskirts of the city. The house had no modern con- 
veniences, but it was clean and airy and there was a nice garden with wide, open 
spaces all around it. The teacher who owned the house put it in good condition 
and charged only $10 a month rent when she heard the story. The St. Vincent 
de Paul Society helped with clothing, furniture and food. 

Soon the effects of better housing conditions, close health supervision, and in- 
creased aid, began to show in the improved health of the entire family. Five of 
the children returned to school in September. The oldest boy found work at $8 
a week, and the aid was somewhat reduced. Gradually as each child in turn 
reached the working age and found employment, aid was further reduced and it 
was wholly withdrawn July 15, 1921, the family having been aided for four years 
and three months under the Mothers' Aid law. 

The oldest of the family was a bright ambitious boy who attended Evening 
High School and graduated with honor in March, 1921. Our Visitor's brother 

secured an opening for him in the Railroad oflfice, w^here C, now 22 

years old, still works and earns $30 a week. 

The next boy, J., now 20 years old, worked as an apprentice and learned the 
concrete mixing business. He wanted to become a contractor so he took a Uni- 
versity Extension Course in draughting and the making of blue prints. J. now 
earns $7 a day besides extra pay for overtime. 

The third boy, T., now 19 years old, works for the Hood Rubber Company and 



10 P.D. 17.1J 

earns $18 a week. He spends his spare time working in a garage and he intends 
to learn the automobile repairing business. 

The oldest girl, F., now 18 years old, runs a power machine in an underwear 
factory and earns, on an average, S20 a week. Four of the children attend school. 

In October, 1924, the family had managed to save S900 which they invested in 

a nine-room house in . They expect to pay for it through the Cooperative 

Bank. 

Our Visitor recently accepted an invitation to take dinner with" the family. The 
house was comfortably furnished and it was immaculately clean with crisp muslin 
curtains and flowering phmts in the windows. The boj's bought a good second- 
hand piano. One of the boys plays the drum and two of the j'ounger children 
take violin lessons. They hope some day to organize an orchestra of their own. 

Mrs. 0. has learned to speak and read English very well, and the children keep 
her supplied with books from the Public Librarj'. 

Today this family is healthy, happy and prosperous, thanks to the tmielj^ help 
wliich the State and city provided for them in their time of need. 

Case No. 2. 

Mr. M., an ex-police officer, became paralyzed from the waist down as a result 
of infantile paralysis, so that the Boston Overseers began to aid the family under 
the Mothers' Aid law. There were four little children under five 3^ears of age. 
The Overseers gave SI 8 a week cash, a S2 grocery order, and fuel each week. The 
St. \'incent de Paul Society sent a $5 grocery order every two weeks and helped 
with clothing and shoes. 

Mr. M. has been treated at the Boston City Hospital, Massachusetts General 
Hospital, and the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital. Ever3i:hing possible has been 
done to improve his condition, but he is stiU confined to a wheel chair in his home. 
The Division of Rehabilitation of the State Department of Education has taken 
a great interest in Mr. M.'s case and he has been taught to make reed trays and 
wooden toys. He has also been taught shoe repairing. In this way, he earns 
quite a little monej' although the chief value of his work lies in the fact that it 
keeps him occupied and contented. 

Case No. 3. 

Mr. D., an habitual drunkard, was sent to the Worcester State Hospital in 
jNIarch, 1916. He had not worked steadily for months, so that his wife had been 
obliged to go out to work in order to supplement his irregular earnings. IMrs. D. 
was a fine intelligent mother who kept a very clean home, and took excellent care 
of her four children. There was a girl of 8 years, and three boys, 7, 5 and 4 j-ears 
old respectively. 

The Overseers gave Mrs. D. SIO a week cash and fuel and she earned the re- 
mainder at day work. Her employer and her relatives helped with clothing which 
Mrs. D. skillfully remodelled. While she was receiving Mothers' Aid, Mrs. D.'s 
teeth were extracted and artificial plates were provided. She was also fitted to 
glasses. 

In the fall of 1922, one of Mrs. D.'s employers advised her to take the Civil 
Ser\'ice examination for School Matron. She passed a very creditable examina- 
tion and was appointed matron in a High School in 1922, at an initial salary of 
SI 6.50 a week. As soon as she received her appointment, Mrs. D. went to the 
Overseers' office, thanked them for the help which they had given her for six 
j^ears, and withdrew her apphcation for aid. 

The oldest of the family, a girl of 17, expects to graduate from High School in 
June, 1925. She intends to appty for Student Help from the Eastham Fund and 
hopes to enter the Boston Teachers' College to train for the teaching profession. 
She has worked as salesgirl everj'- Saturday and during vacations for the past 
three years, giving aU of her earnings to her mother. 

The oldest boy, 16 years old, expects to graduate from High School in June, 
1925. He has had a splencUd school record; is editor of the school paper, senior 
captain and vice-president of his class. T. has worked at the State House during 
summer vacations for the past two years, having passed Civil Service examinations 



Pt. I. 11 

for clerk with a high rating. He would like to go to Annapolis, but he intends to 
go to work and continue his studies in the evening at Boston University School 
of Business Administration. 

The two youngest boys are Boy Scouts. They also attend classes at the Neigh- 
borhood House, where they have been taught to make a splendid bookcase and a 
very good radio set. 

Airs. D.'s salar}^ has been increased to 818 a week and she earns 84 on Satur- 
day. They have moved to a better tenement where they are gradually adding 
new furniture. 

Mrs D. was grateful for Mothers' Aid, but she longed for the day when she 
could be self-supporting. She saj^s that the best way she can show her apprecia- 
tion of the help which she has received is to bring up her children to be good, loyal, 
useful citizens. 

These cases are our best examples of careful planning with the mothers as well 
as for them in order to capitahze the abiUties of each. 

Statistics. 

At the beginning of the fiscal j-ear (on December 1, 1923) there were 3,072 mothers 
with 9,120 dependent children under 14 j^ears of age receiving ^Mothers' Aid. 

During the year 636 new cases were aided and 808 cases were closed, so that 
there were 2,900 mothers in receipt of IMothers' Aid at the close of the fiscal year 
(November 30, 1924). 

On December 1, 1923, the 3,072 mothers with 9,120 dependent children were 
classified as follows: 

A. Classified as to legal settlement: 

1. Without legal settlement: 

486 mothers with 1,362 dependent children. 

2. With a legal settlement: 

2,586 mothers with 7,758 dependent children. 

B. Classified as to widowhood: 

1. Widows: 

2,580 mothers vdih 7,669 dependent children. 

2. Not widows: 

492 mothers with 1,451 dependent children. 
Note. — The li\'ing husbands of mothers were classified as follows: 

246 were totallj' incapacitated (76 were insane, 170 had chronic illness; of the latter number, 89 

had tuberculosis and 81 had diseases other than tuberculosis). 
198 were deserting husbands. 
20 were divorced or legally separated. 
28 were in jail. 

The new cases that were received during the fiscal year included 636 mothers 
with 2,193 dependent children, and were classified as follows: 

A. Classified as to legal settlement: 

1. Without legal settlement: 

93 mothers with 323 dependent children. 

2. With a legal settlement: 

543 mothers with 1,870 dependent children. 

B. Classified as to widowhood: 

1. Widows: 

448 mothers with 1,535 dependent children. 

2. Not widows: 

188 mothers wth 658 dependent children. 
Note. — The li\nng husbands of the 188 mothers were classified as follows: 

128 were totally incapacitated (29 were insane, 99 had chronic illness; of the latter number, 65 

had tuberculosis and 34 had diseases other than tuberculosis). 
45 were deserting husbands. 
8 were divorced or legally separated. 
7 were in jail. 

Of the 636 new Alothers' Aid cases entered last j^ar 131 were reopened cases 
as follows: 

Families removed from one tow 
Insufficient income 
Better housing 
Home re-established 
Conformity with policies 
Husband returned to hospital 
Husband sent back to jail 



n to another .......... 43 

65 
5 
4 
8 



131 

Reasons for closing Mothers' Aid Cases. 

Sufficient income ............... 379 

Applicant remarried . . . . . . . .102 

Family moved ............... 65 



12 P.D 

Husband resumed support of family 

Xou-couforniity with policies . 

Youngest ohiki 14 years of age 

L'ufituess of mother 

Transferred to other sources of relief 

Applicant died ... 

Application withdrawn 

Disbandment of home 

Applicant in hospital 

One dependent child 

Unsuitable housing 

Miscellaneous .... 

Duration of Mothers' Aid Cases closed between December 1, 1923, and 
November 30, 1924. 

Less than 1 year 
Less than 2 years 
Lesa than 3 years 
Less than 4 years 
Less than 5 years 
Less than 6 years 
Less than 7 years 
Less than S years 
Less than 9 years 
Less than 10 years 
Less than 11 years 
Eleven years . 

Mothers' Aid Appropriation by the Massachusetts Legislature. 
(For reimbursement purposes.) 



17. 

48 

55 

15 

47 

31 

IC 

6 

6 

15 

7 

4 

12 

808 



245 
98 
78 
84 
64 
85 
43 
38 
24 
27 
21 
1 



Sept. 1, 
Dec. 1, 
Dec. 1, 
Dec. 1. 
Dec. 1, 
Dec. 1, 
Dec. 1, 
Dec. 1, 
Dec. 1, 
Dec. 1, 
Dec. 1, 



1913, 
1914, 
1915, 
1916, 
1917, 
1918, 
1919, 
1920, 
1921, 
1922, 
1923. 



to Nov. 30 
to Nov. 30, 
to Nov. 30, 
to Nov. 30, 
to Nov. 30, 
to Nov. 30, 
to Nov. 30, 
to Nov. 30, 
to Nov. 30, 
to Nov. 30, 
to Nov. 30, 



1914, State appropriation of 

1915, State appropriation of 

1916, State appropriation of 

1917, State appropriation of 

1918, State appropriation of 

1919, State appropriation of 

1920, State appropriation of 

1921, State appropriation of 

1922, State appropriation of 

1923, State appropriation of 

1924, State appropriation of 



Subdivision of Social Service. 



8175,000 
250,000 
300,000 
400,000 
475,000 
550,000 
775,000 
900.000 
850.000 
900,000 
950,000 



Miss Flora E. Burton, Supervisor. 

The statistics show the amount of work carried by this subdivision. Because 
of prohibition, the number of women admitted to the State Infirmaiy on account 
of alcoholism was onh' three. Only twenty-six women were admitted with "no 
disease," some of whom were obliged to come because of sick children or because 
they had been deserted while traveling. 

Our work in regard to the prosecution of fathers of illegitimate children is noted 
in the summary table on page 15. These men are put on probation for a period 
of two years, and at the end of that time the mother of the child must take out a 
new warrant for arrest, as the man invariably refuses to pay without court order. 
This procedure subjects the mother again to court proceedings and undeserved 
humiliation. At this time the man has frequently disappeared. The probation 
officer has been unable to keep control over him and the children become public 
charges. 

Twenty feeble-minded unmarried mothers are detained at the State Infirmarj^, 
15 of whom have been waiting three years or more for commitment to the schools 
for the feeble-minded. Sixteen of these women have had 26 illegitimate children. 
They need protection from society, and society, in turn, needs to be protected 
from them. Frequently they become restless and abscond from the institution. 
As they are not under legal commitment, we cannot return them to the State 
Infirmarj'. As a safeguard to these women and to the community, we are urging 
that they be committed, under section 2-1 of chapter 123 of the General Laws, 
to the Department of Mental Diseases which would then have a right to return 
them to custod}' in case they abscond. 

The results of intelhgent and kind supervision over the young women who go 
to the State Infirmarj'- are remarkable and the lack of it is disastrous. The Girls' 
Parole Branch and the Division of Child Guardianship frequently refer to us their 
girls who have reached the age of 21, but who cannot go on safely in the community 



Pt. I. 13 

without guidance. Other girls who have done well under State supervision get 
into difficulty after they become 21, if they are not so referred to this subdivision 
for further care. 

To prove the value of supervision, a survey was made of 100 unmarried mothers 
with their babies who had been under the care of the subdivision for periods ex- 
tending from two to eleven years. The selection was based on three facts : — first, 
that the baby had been nursed and cared for by its mother; second, that the 
mother had had long-time supervision, two years or more; and third, that the 
present condition of these mothers and babies was known to the visitors. The 
facts about the 101 children including two twins were found to be as follows: 

63 children were with their mothers. 

33 children were boarded (23 by Division of Child Guardianship, and 10 independently). 

2 children had been adopted. 

3 children had died of diphtheria. 



Age 


Number 


11 years 


2 children 


10 years 


9 children 


9 years 


8 children 


8 years 


12 children 


7 years 


6 children 


6 years 


10 children 


5 years 


18 children 


4 years 


15 children 


3 years 


16 children 


2 years 


5 children 



Fifty-eight children w^re being entirely supported by their mothers and 34 
children were being partially supported by their mothers, but of all the children 
only 38 were receiving even partial support from their fathers. 

The mothers have all nursed and cared for their babies through infancy. They 
have worked with their babies, usually at domestic service, and have not been 
separated from them until it seemed best for the welfare of the children. Some 
of the mothers were below normal mentally but they were not committable as 
feeble-minded. One was committed to a school for the feeble-minded because 
she had become illegitimately pregnant for a second time, after five j^ears of super- 
vision. Some of the others may be committed later if they prove themselves un- 
able to get along in the community. Thirteen of these unmarried mothers were 
illegitimate children themselves, and 59 of them had had 68 illegitimate children 
previous to supervision. While under care, only 11 have had children. 

Number of years of supervision over mothers. 

2 have been under supervision for 11 years. 

7 have been under supervision for 10 years. 

7 have been under supervision for 9 years. 
10 have been under super\dsion for 8 years. 

5 have been under supervision for 7 years. 

9 have been under supervision for 6 years. 
23 have been under supervision for 5 years. 
17 have been under supervision for 4 years. 
16 have been under supervision for 3 years. 

4 have been under supervision for 2 years. 

Attitude of Families. 

66 mothers have been received back by their own families. 

6 mothers are still ostracised by their families. 
28 mothers have no famihes in this country. 

At the time of the survey 34 mothers had been married, 2 being married to the 
fathers of the children; 44 were not married but were living good moral lives; 
21 were living questionably; and 1 had died. Eighty-eight were found to be self 
supporting and 78 were found to be self respecting. . 

The 78 women who are now self respecting responded to wise and firm guidance. 
All of the 98 children (3 having died) are well cared for and in good homes. If 
supervision can bring about these results in the cases of 98 illegitimate children, 
should not the State provide a system of care wherel^y all children born out of 
wedlock may have a fair chance for health and happiness'!* 

Our supervision cannot always be as thorough as we wish to have it because 
our present staff of workers is much over-burdened and emergencies require much 
of our time. We realize that supervision is the most worth-while work of the sub- 
division because it means the strengthening and up-building of character. 



14 



Women and Children adm 





Ages at Admission. 




Under 1 




63 


1 to S 




. 69 


9 to 16 




o3 


17 to 21 




. 146 


Over 21 




. 375 
706 


Sources from which received: 




Under 1: 






Overseer 


■s of the Poor 


. 61 


Dixnsion 


of Child Guardianship 


1 


Board of 


Health . 


1 



itted to the State Infirmary dwing the Year 
November 30, 1924. 

Ages at Admission — Con. 
17 to 21: 

Overseers of the Poor 
Division of Child Guardianship 
Industrial School for Girls 
Lyman School for Boys . 
Board of Health 
Reformatory for Women 
Schools for the Feeble-minded 
Monson State Hospital . 



P.D. 17. 

ending 



1 toS: 

Overseers of the Poor 
Di\ision of Child Guardianship 
Board of Health 



9 to 16: 

Overseers of the Poor 
Di\ision of Child Guardianship 
Industrial School for Girls , . 
Board of Health 



Diseases at Admission 
Under 1: 

Miscellaneous diseases 
Congenital syphihs 
Gonorrhea 
Tuberculosis . 
Feeble-mindedness 
No disease 



1 to 8: 

Miscellaneous diseases 
Congenital syphiUs 
Gonorrhea 
Tuberculosis . 
Feeble-mindedness 
No 



9 to 16: 

Miscellaneous diseases 
Syphihs 
Gonorrhea 
Tuberculosis . 
Feeble-mindedness 
Mental observation 
Pregnancy 
No disease 



63 



Over 21: 

Overseers of the Poor 
Board of Health 



54 


Reformatory for Women 




14 
1 


Schools for the Feeble-minded 


69 




. . 28 




12 




10 




3 




53 






Diseases at Admission — Con 




16 to 21: 


6 


Miscellaneous diseases 


3 


Syphihs 




1 


Gonorrhea 




1 


Tuberculosis . 




2 


Feeble-mindedness 




50 


Mental observation 






Pregnancy 




63 


Convalescent parturition 




. 21 



1 

16 


No disease 




Over 21: 


9 


Miscellaneous diseases 


22 


Syphihs 






Gonorrhea 




69 


Tuberculosis . 
Feeble-mindedness 




14 


Mental observation 




3 


Pregnancy 







Convalescent parturition 




7 


Arteriosclerosis 




9 


Alcohohsm 







Morphine 
No disease . 




12 




8 




53 




Births, 145 (illej 


^timate, 136). 


Deaths, 102. 







146 



349 



375 



146 



106 

6 

13 

31 

3 

21 

76 

20 

69 

3 

1 

26 

375 



Women and Children discharged from the State Infirmary during Year ending 

November SO, 1924. 

Wrentham State School . 



Discharges to — 

Parents ..... 

Relatives ..... 

Husbands (19 women and 4 children) 

Employment with child (41 children) 

Employment 

DiNHsion of Child Guardianship 

Girls' Parole Department (27 women and 9 

children) .... 
Lym^an School for Boys . 
Department of Correction 
Reformatory for Women (22 women and 11 

children) .... 
Court (7 women and 3 children) 
State Farm .... 
Belchertown State School 
Massachusetts School for Feeble-minded 

Waverley ..,.., 



36 
107 
23 
82 
32 
41 

36 



Worcester State Hospital 

Monson State Hospital . 

Insane Ward (Commitments) . 

North Reading State Sanatorium 

Temporary Home .... 

Other Societies .... 

Place of Settlement (48 women and 10 chil- 
dren) ..... 

U. S. Commissioner of Immigration (14 
women and 7 children) 

Other States (12 women and 2 children) 

Other Countries .... 

Absconded ..... 



1 
2 
18 
2 
2 
9 

58 

21 

14 

2 

45 

614 



Pt. I. 15 

Summary of Placement Work. 



Persons under active supervision, Nov. 30, 

1924 462 

145 mothers with 146 babies . .291 

Mothers boarding babies . 57 

Other women and children under su- 
pervision . . . . .114 
Visits to girls in own homes . . . 104 
Visits to girls at employment . . . 296 
Visits to girls elsewhere .... 599 



Visits to girls in out-patient departments of 

hospitals 212 

452 

128 

143 

14 

35 



Visits for investigation 
Replacements .... 
Places of employment investigated 
Marriages .... 

Transportation applications at oflBce 
Fiftj-one savings accounts for girls at work, 

$3,327 86 



Summary of Court Work. 

Warrants on bastardy complaint ........... 23 

Cases appealed to Superior Court ........... 3 

Adjudications of paternity ............ 15 

Agreements for support of illegitimate children ......... 6 

Warrants for abandonment of children .......... 1 

Adoption of children by relatives ........... 3 

Commitment to schools for the feeble-minded ......... 23 

Money collected for support of illegitimate children ........ $5,106 35 

Money paid out for support of illegitimate children ........ $4,276 08 

Number of accounts for illegitimate children ......... 66 

Balance on hand for illegitimate children, Nov. 30. 1924 S9,905 93 

General Summary. 

Women and children admitted to the State Infirmary ........ 706 

Births at the State Infirmarj^ ............. 145 

Women and children discharged from the State Infirmary ........ 614 

Deaths at the State Infirmary ............ 102 

Women and children discharged directly to other Departments ....... 172 

Women and children discharged by the Social Service Division ....... 442 

Applications at office .............. 85 

Persons vmder supervision in the community Nov. 30, 1924 . . . . . . .461 

Total number assisted by Subdivision of Social Service during year ending Nov. 30, 1924 . . 989 

An Experiment in Socl\l Service for ]\Ien at the State iNFiRiiARY. 

This experiment shows that it pays to go beneath the surface of things. At 
the State Infirmary the usual situation is that the patients are as well satisfied 
as any hospital patients can be; they are well cared for and well placed in wards 
which are comfortable, airy, and well situated in good countiy sm-roundings. With 
twelve doctors and two hundred nurses and attendants, reasonablj^ good care is 
possible. 

But with over four thousand persons passing through the institution each year 
and from two thousand to twenty-five hundred persons there at one time, it pays 
to have someone who can go a Uttle bit into the lives of the patients and stud}^ them 
individually, more than can be done by a busy doctor or a nurse who has to ad- 
minister to the physical needs of thirty or forty people continuously. 

The mass treatment is the big function of the Infirmary. It reUeves the hospi- 
tals of the cities of chronic cases which would otherwise clog them so that they 
could not take care of the acute and curable cases. But the verj- fact that such 
large numbers are cared for makes it important that there should be someone who 
is going beneath the surface of the stream of patients to examine some of the indi- 
vidual cases. The experiment shows that some of these cases are not properly 
placed at the Infirmary and that the expense of their care can be saved to the 
state treasury; it shows that some can be found work outside, others can be found 
relatives outside, others can be found friends outside, making possible a better 
life for the patient and a saving of the expense of institutional care. 

This most valuable work is done at no expense to the Commonwealth. The 
salary of the worker is saved in the first few cases. It means an enlarged ser\'ice 
for the Infirmary, a more economical administration of the institution and greater 
happiness for the patients who are so guided. 

The follo\\ing stories of the men whom the visitor has helped this year speak for 
themselves: 

A man, 29 years old, who had formerly worked as a hospital attendant, was 
sent to the hospital from a City Department of Public Welfare because he was 
physically incapacitated and without relatives or friends. Although he thought 
that his physical condition would prevent him from trying to find work as a hos- 
pital attendant again, the visitor encouraged him and the doctor agreed that it 
would be possible. The visitor was able to secure a position for him as orderly 



16 P.D. 17. 

at a Boston hospital and with her assistance the patient was able to hold this 
position in an entirely satisfacton- manner. 

A man of forty-one, very lame from an old fracture of the leg which had been 
improperly set, was sent to the Infirmary because he could not support himself. 
He seemed willing to work and the visitor was able to place him at the Morgan 
Memorial where he is working happily in one of the industrial departments. 

In April, a wandering shoemaker, restaurant worker, and vaudeville singer, 
aged forty-seven, was sent to the Infirmary suffering greatly from an old fracture 
of his arm. In June, 1924, when the arm was strong enough to warrant a trial 
outside, the visitor sent him to the Industrial Aid Society in Boston, an agency 
which is glad to cooperate. This agency told the patient that there was very 
little work in Boston in June, gave him three tickets for meals and advised sleeping 
at the Wood Yard and visiting certain employment agencies. This patient did 
as he was advised and finally secured a steady factory job. He writes grateful 
letters to the visitor who had shown him just the stepping stone that was needed 
to lead him to success. 

Even when placement at work is not possible, there can sometimes be found a 
solution of a patient's difficulties other than to allow him to remain a state charge 
at the Infirmary. A young man of twenty-one years was confined to a wheel 
chair, practically rigid with chronic arthritis in back and legs. Since the time 
when the doctors decided that there could be no hope of recovery, the sister who 
had brought him to the Infirmary ceased to visit him and it was much better 
for the patient to be sent back to a County Farm in New Hampshire where he 
could be near people who had been friendly and where he could enjoy a smaller 
and more homelike institution. 

Partially blind and gradually becoming more and more so, a young man of 
twenty was sent to the Infirmary because his family could no longer care for him. 
The visitor became satisfied that if training could be secured for him he could re- 
ceive proper home care. As an exceptional case, showing immediate possibility 
of rehabilitation, she found it possible to get him admitted to Perkins Institution 
in spite of an age disqualification which would ordinarily prevent. With good 
follow-up work and after the patient has a little training, he will be able to live at 
home instead of at the State Infirmary. 

To find old friends and relatives who are lost is worth while because with sus- 
tained effort it may be possible later to make a successful placement. An intelli- 
gent Russian of thirty-five, speaking English well, was sent to the Infirmary in 
September, 1920, from a City Hospital for chronic care, having received such 
severe injuries in a motor cycle accident as to render both arms entirely useless. 
His last letter to his only relative in this country, a brother in Detroit, having 
been returned, Nick was very depressed. A visit to one of his old friends in Woon- 
socket brought information through another friend giving the address of the 
brother, and through the Department of Public Welfare of Detroit the brother 
and the mother (in Poland) were put in touch, much to Nick's pleasure and prob- 
ably to his future advantage. 

Several men of sufficient strength to help as orderlies or porters in the hospital 
wards were placed in such positions in private hospitals and were restored to posi- 
tions of self-support. Others were placed on farms. 

Even when there is little present prospect of a permanent plan for the rehabili- 
tation of the patient, the visitor can be of great service to the physician in supply- 
ing information about the patient's state of mind, his possible plans and his his- 
tory. She can also help the patient to be more comfortable and happy and so 
to be cured more quickly. 

A young man who had been unwilling to wait for a cure and who had left the 
Infirmary once in impatience was returned from the Massachusetts General Hos- 
pital, ordered to lie on a traction frame for six months. A visit to his home and 
constant visits to the patient helped to keep up his morale and helped him to go 
through with the wearisome treatment. 

A 3^oung blind man who had become so depressed that he had tried to shoot 
himself was helped with letters to his friends and family, with a visit to a fellow- 
countryman in another part of the Infirmary, and similar things which gave him 
new courage. 



Pt. I. 17 

The family of a boy suffering from chorea were helped to see that they could 
care for him at home; an old man was helped to get his dividends from a closed 
trust company. 

The visitor has had many chances during the few months' experiment to help 
patients write letters to friends and relatives, to find their addresses, to secure 
visits from them and to help patients with claims for compensation for injuries. 

DIVISION OF CHILD GUARDIANSHIP. 

James E. Fee, Director. 
Children in Care and Custody of the Division. 

At the beginning of the last official year, December 1, 1923, there were 5,550 chil- 
dren under care and custody of the Division of Child Guardianship, — 177 dehn- 
quent, 22 wayward, 2,749 neglected and 2,602 dependent children. There were 767 
children received during the year, viz. : — 91 delinquent, 5 wayward, 266 neglected 
and 405 dependent. The total number under care was, therefore, 6,317. Dis- 
charges from custody were as follows: 121 delinquent, 10 wayward, 439 neglected 
and 363 dependent, making the total number discharged 933. At the close of the 
year, November 30, 1924, there remained in charge of the Division of Child Guard- 
ianship, 5,384 children, classified as: delinquent 147, wayward 17, neglected 2,576, 
and dependent 2,644. 

Five thousand and thirty-seven (5,037) of the 5,384 children under care Novem- 
ber 30, 1924, were over three years of age and cared for as follows: in places receiving 
wages, 800; in places free of expense to the State, 528; in places partially supported 
by the State, 274: in places fully supported by the State, 2,995; in hospitals and 
special schools, subject to care and treatment, 240; in United States service, 62; 
married, 39; and whereabouts unknown, 99. 

Three hundred and forty-seven (347) of the total under care November 30, 1924, 
who were under three years of age, were classified as follows : in families free of ex- 
pense, 20; in homes fully supported by the State, 301; in hospitals, 26.^ 

Children under Three Years of Age. 

The number of children under three years of age in charge of this Division at 
the beginning of the year, December 1, 1923, was 338. Two hundred thirty-three 
(233) infants were received, making the whole number supported during the year, 
571. Of this number, 211 infants were discharged, and 13 died. The number re- 
maining November 30, 1924, was 347 infants. 

Forty-two (42) of the 233 infants received were committed by the Courts under 
provisions of section 42, chapter 119, and 48 were committed by the Overseers of 
the Poor under the provisions of section 22, chapter 119 of the General Laws. 
One hundred thirty-nine (139) were received under provisions of section 38, and 
4 were removed from unsuitable boarding places under the provisions of section 
28 of the same chapter. These 4 infants were in an almost hopeless condition 
when removed, but improved in suitable surroundings, and finally recovered. 

The discharges during the year are classified as follows: 157, having reached the 
age of three years, were transferred to the subdivision for older children; 7 were 
legally adopted: 38 were discharged to parents or relatives; 6 to Court; 1 to the 
City of Boston; 2 were bailed; and 13 died. 

Twenty (20) of the remaining 347 infants were placed in homes without expense 
to the State; 301 were at board; and 26 were in hospitals. 

Four (4) visiting registered nurses made 6,160 visits. Included in this number 
are 5,577 visits to infant wards and 583 visits of investigation and inspection of 
homes of applicants for licenses and homes in which infants are boarded privately. 

Our physician reported 1,611 physical examinations. This number includes the 

1 In addition to these 5,384 children, the Department had under its supervision and visitation November 
30, 1924, 445 boys at the Lyman School for Boys; 276 girls at the Industrial School for Girls; 262 boys 
at the Industrial School for Boys; 2,610 boys and 432 girls in the custody of the Trustees of the Massa- 
chusetts Training Schools, outside the schools; 92 boys and 94 girls, patients at the Massachusetts Hospi- 
tal School; and 181 children, patients at the State Infirmary, who are either young infants with their 
mothers, or else under hospital treatment, making approximately a total of 9,776 children in the care and 
custody or under the supervision of the Department. There were also 1,111 children supported at the 
expense of cities and towns who were subject to the Department's visitation, reported upon at page 50. 



18 P.D. 17 

first examination which is always given on admission and re-examinations ,/hich 
are required as necessity arises. These examinations are usually made at 'The 
Nursery" which is the receivinj^ station for children under three years of age. 
Two hundred and seventy-six. (27G) infants received temporary care at "The Nur- 
sery" during the year. 

The percentage of mortality for the total number of infants supported was 
2.27%. Three (3) died in the State Infirmary, 7 in local hospitals, and 3 in foster 
homes. Ninety-eight (98) of the 571 infants supported were under one year of 
age. Six (6) of this number died, making the percentage of deaths for infants 
under one year, 6.12%. 

Mortality Rate. 

Birth to one year . 6 or 6 . 12% 

One year to two years ............ 4 or 2.27% 

Over two years . . . . 3 or 1 . % 

The following table shows the rate of mortality among infants under three years, 
also under one year — for the past ten year period: 



Under One Year 


Undeb 


Three Years 


Yea a 


Total 


Died 


Percentage 


Total 


Died 


Percentage 


1915 . 


197 


21 


10.65 


667 


36 


5.39 


1916 . 


214 


29 


13.55 


692 


46 


6.64 


1917 . 


236 


36 


15.25 


716 


50 


6.98 


1918 . 


212 


24 


11.32 


725 


37 


5.10 


1919 . 


213 


23 


10.79 


740 


34 


4.59 


1920 . 


180 


23 


12.77 


646 


33 


5.10 


1921 . 


170 


16 


9.41 


614 


30 


4.88 


1922 . 


155 


9 


5.8 


588 


20 


3.4 


1923 . 


106 


9 


8.5 


616 


20 


3.2 


1924 . 


98 


6 


6.12 


571 


13 


2.27 



Details of Mortality of Infants under One Year of Age. 





Placed in Hospitals 






Under Care Length of Time in Hospitals Age at Death 


Cause of Death 


A . 
B . 
C . 
D . 


. 4h months ... 3 days . 7 months 19 days 
. 12 days . . . .11 days . 1 month 12 days 
. 7 months 1 week . . 10 days . 10 months 17 days 
. 3 months 3 weeks 5 days . 13 days . 5 months 2 days 


. Enteritis. 

Malnutrition. 
. Pneumonia. 
. Ulcerative colitis. 


Boarded in Private Families 




Under Care Age at Time of Death 


Cause of Death 


E . 
F . 


. 8 months 23 days . . 9 months 2 days 
. 4 months 20 days . . 9 months 2 days 


Pneumonia. 
Whooping cough. 


Details of Mortality of Infants between One and Three Years. 

Placed in Hospitals 


Under Care Length of Time in Hospital Age at Death Cause of Death 



A . 


14 days 


13 days 


B 


8 months 14 days 


3 days 


C 


2 months 10 days 


29 days 


D . 


1 year 7 months . 


11 months 19 days 


E 


18 days 


18 days 


F 


2 years 2 months . 


5 months 



1 year 1 month 9 days 

2 years 1 month 13 days . 
1 year 1 month 

1 year 8 months 10 days. 

1 year 4 months 2 days . 

2 years 3 months 10 days 



Meningitis. 
Diphtheria. 

Pneumonia (Bronchial). 
Enteritis (Feeble-minded). 
Microcephalous. 
Noma (Idiot). 



Boarded in Private Families 



Under Care 



Age at Time of Death 



Cause of Death 



. 27 days 



. 2 years 2 months 20 days 



Acute indigestion. 



ri.i. 19 

>■ Children over Three Years of Age. 

On December 1, 1923, children over three years of age under care numbered 5,212, 
— 2,361 girls and 2,851 boys. There were admitted during the following year, 
691 — including 534 new cases and 157 transferred from the subdivision for in- 
fants; 21 died, 216 became of age; 47 were adopted; 62 were transferred to train- 
ing schools; 8 were discharged to places of settlement, and 78 to the Department 
of Mental Diseases; and 434 were otherwise discharged. There were remaining 
under care November 30, 1924, 5,037 children, — 2,734 boys and 2,303 girls. The 
net decrease in population for the year was 175, or 3.35%. 

Forty-six (46) visitors made 22,138 visits to children in foster homes. This 
number does not include visits of investigation of prospective foster homes, nor 
investigations of applications for release of children from custody. In addition 
to the above, 1,119 children supported by cities and towns were visited in accord- 
ance with section 16, chapter 121, of the General Laws. 

We received 1,210 foster home applications during the year; included in this 
number are 695 for children under 12 years of age, of which 268 were approved 
after investigation, and 515 for boys and girls over 12 years of age, of which 196 
were found to be suitable and approved. 

Two thousand, one hundred fifty-two (2,152) boys and girls under care are over 
14 years of age, and 929 of this number are attending school under the following 
conditions: 125 are earning wages and 152 are in free homes — hence 277 or 29% 
are practically no expense to the State; 189 girls and 62 boys earn their board by 
their services out of school hours, and are given an allowance for clothing by the 
Department; 401 are provided with board and clothing by the Department. 

At School — Over 14 Years of Age. 

Boys Girls 

Attending: 

Grammar School ........... 

Junior High School ........... 

High School 

Normal School ............ 

Trades or Business School .......... 

College .............. 

Evening School ............ 



Under follo\ving conditions: 

Receiving wages — free of expense to Department 
Free Homes ...... 

Partly free (clothing only provided) 

On parole with parents .... 

Board and clothing provided 



177 


164 


50 


88 


117 


242 


_ 


3 


10 


20 


4 


3 


14 


37 


372 


557 


15 


110 


71 


39 


62 


189 


18 


24 


206 


195 



372 557 



Our women visitors are required to attend all Courts in which no woman proba- 
tion officer is employed. This work involves much time and thought. It is to 
be regretted that often the notice to attend is sent so late that there is no time 
for an investigation before the hearing. Whenever possible, however, our agent 
is glad to make such preliminary investigation. 

Women visitors attended one hundred and sixty (160) cases this year. It was 
necessary to continue ninety (90) of these cases for further hearing. Final dispo- 
sition was as follows: 

Dismissed ...... 26 

Committed to Lancaster .... 35 

Committed to Lancaster and sentence sus- 
pended ....... 8 

Committed to Lancaster and appealed . . 4 

Filed 19 



Placed on Probation ..... 43 

Defaulted 7 

Found Not Guilty 1 

Sent to House of Good Shepherd . . 3 

Appealed ....... 4 

Committed to Division of Child Guardianship 10 

A short r^sum6 of these last ten cases may be interesting. 

A and B, sisters, aged 12 and 13, committed as stubborn, February 8, 1924, on 
complaint of their father. Mother a nervous, immoral woman ^vith no discipline. 
Father an honest, hard working man but mentally deficient. Girls sadly lacking 
parental care. Had had sex experiences. B, afflicted with gonorrhea and treat- 
ment advised. She was immediately placed in hospital where she still remains. 
A, placed in boarded home, entered fifth grade in school, doing very good work. 



20 P.D. 17. 

C, aged 15, committed as delinquent April 24, 1924, charged with lewd and 
lascivious conduct. Father had coimnitted suicide. JMother married again. 
Home conditions unhappy. According to girl's own story had had intercourse 
with strange man. No thsease. Placed in boarding home. Is sophomore in 
high school, doing very well." Shows no more interest in boys than any normal 
girl. 

D, aged 14, committed as delinquent April 5, 1924. Mother dead, a suicide. 
Father attentive to another woman. Girl's own brother had had immoral rela- 
tions with her for nearly three years. Placed in home where her services are ap- 
preciated so that she earns her board. Is attending school, doing very well. 

E, aged 15, an orphan, committed May 29, 1924. Girl and sister living with 
grandmother and step-grandfather. Out nights. Very unhappy at home. Ab- 
sent SO sessions out of 164 at school. Failed in all studies. Wishes to do house- 
work. Placed in private family at wages, doing work very well, but keeps late 
hours and cannot be trusted to return when she goes out. Lost home on this 
account. Has been replaced and is now doing well. 

F, aged 16, committed July 12, 1924, as stubborn. Mother dead; father mar- 
ried again. Step-mother unkind. Girl unhappy and ran away from home. Left 
school at the age of 14. Worked in shoe factory. Placed in home earning her 
own board. Attending seventh grade in school and doing very well. 

G, aged 13, committed July 15, 1924, as stubborn. Mother works in paper 
mill. Father says girl persistent runaway. Stole small sums of money from the 
home. Father is said to be cruel to girl. Since placed, girl has had three homes. 
Is bold and saucy in extreme. Not making good. Has been examined by alienist. 
May possibly prove to be feeble-minded. 

H, aged 14, committed as delinquent August 14, 1924, charged with lewd and 
lascivious conduct. Father dead; mother confirmed drunkard. Girl has been at 
Revere Beach picking up acquaintance of sailors and all sorts of boys. Placed in 
boarding home, attending sixth grade in school, and giving no trouble thus far. 
Doing excellent work and has gained 18 pounds. 

I, aged 15, committed August 20, 1924. Father dead. Mother gave up child, 
placing her at board with strangers, so that she has been in several different homes. 
Mother probably feeble-minded. Is hving now with married man. Girl in last 
year in high school. Admits immoral relations. Has been placed in school 
home. Very helpful, especially capable in sewing. Recently made dress for her- 
self. Doing well in school. 

J, aged 13, committed September 25, 1924, as dehnquent. Mother dead; father 
married again. Step-mother unkind and older sisters very immoral and bad in- 
fluence over this girl. Placed at board and doing well thus far. 

Five hundred and eighty-two (582) visits were made during the year to the men- 
tally defective girls. There were 156 of these girls under care November 30, 1924, 
of which number 78 were boarded, 5 were maintained without expense to the Divi- 
sion, and 34 were employed as mother's helpers or at housework. The remaining 
39 are in institutions, hospitals or temporary homes. Sixty-seven (67) of the 
boarded girls were over and 11 were under twelve years of age. Twenty-two (22) 
of these attended public school but in grades below their actual age. Nine (9) 
girls above seventeen years, employed at wages, attended evening school. One 
of these succeeded in graduating from the grammar grades and presented an 
original essay on Woodrow Wilson at the graduation exercises. She is now doing 
creditable work in the business course of the evening high school. 

Others are taking Domestic Science courses in evening classes. Since given this 
diversion from their dail}^ tasks their work and conduct have greatly improved. 
Their average wage this year is $4 a week, 3 girls earning $25 a month, 3 others 
earning $30. The accumulated savings for this j^ear amount to $4,000, which is 
held in trust for them. 

Twenty-two (22) girls were placed from boarding homes, after training, into 
wage homes and 60% of such girls keep their jobs and do well under supervision 
and friendly, encouraging visitation. 

Four (4) of the girls who were discharged from custody and who became of age 
the past year, remain in same homes. They are doing well and continue to keep 
in friendly touch with the Department. Three (3) others were discharged to rela- 



Pt. I. 21 

tives and are at work, making good. Five (5) were sent to the State Infirmary 
as runaways or for being immoral and they await admission to a school for the 
feeble-minded. Three others eloped from the Infirmary and as yet have not been 
apprehended. 

During the year 28 girls were committed to the schools for the feeble-minded. 

The loss of Dr. Fernald, late Superintendent of the Massachusetts School for 
the Feeble-Minded at Waverley has been keenly felt by this Division. Those 
who came in close touch with him at his clinics, in connection with their girl prob- 
lems, feel in his passing on an inestimable loss but do not forget his policy to "give 
the feeble-minded girl a chance" and to ''carry on." 

Adoptions. 

Applications for children for adoption: 

Pending at beginning of the year ........... 17 

New applications ............. 103 

120 

Disapproved without investigation .......... 8 

Withdrawn 17 

Investigated .............. 83 

Pending 12 

120 

Homes investigated ............. 83 

Approved ............... 60 

Disapproved .............. 23 

Fifty children have been placed for adoption during the year. Fifty-four chil- 
dren have been legally adopted, 31 girls and 23 boys. The oldest child adopted 
was a boy 19 years old and the j'oungest a boy 14 months old. There are now on 
trial for adoption 58 children. 

Adoptions were granted during the year in the Probate Courts for the following 
Counties: Barnstable, 1; Berkshire, 1; Bristol, 1; Essex, 15; Hampden, 1; 
Middlesex, 13; Norfolk, 4; Plymouth, 3; Suffolk, 9; Worcester, 6; total, 54. 

Subdivision of Investigation. 

During the past year 76 children were committed to this Division by Overseers 
of the Poor under section 22, chapter 119 of the General Laws by ad\dce from this 
Department. Inasmuch as many of the cases were those of deserted children, 
it has been impossible to get definite facts, especially as to legitimacy and the 
history of the parents. 

However, an analysis of these cases sets forth some interesting details. Of the 
76 children, 41 were male and 35 female. Fortj^-one are known to be legitimate, 
31 illegitimate, and 4 are of unknown status. There were 6 whose religion was 
undetermined, 1 of Jewish parentage, 37 of the Catholic faith and 32 of Protestant 
faith. The ages varied from one month to eighteen years and were classified as 
follows: Under one year, 16; one to five years, 24; five to ten years, 17; ten to 
fourteen years, 1 1 ; over fourteen, 8. 

The 8 children over fourteen were committed for the following reasons. Two 
girls, sisters, eighteen and fourteen years, had been deserted by their father after 
the mother's death. Both girls are mentally defective and the relatives who cared 
for them were of the same type. The girls were not wanted and were passed about, 
not receiving the care and protection they needed. A seventeen-year-old girl, 
also deserted by her father, and whose mother is dead, had been shifting for herself 
for about two j^ears. She had not had good companions and was referred to this 
Division when in the hospital for confinement. Her baby was committed with 
her. A sixteen-year-old girl, formerly a State ward, had been discharged to rela- 
tives in another State. They were good people but she became unmanageable and 
finally ran back to Boston. She was reported as a vagrant and was recommitted. 
One girl of fouiteen, born in Massachusetts, had spent most of her life in Xova 
Scotia. Her mother died and for some months she was in the care of a local chil- 
dren's agency. When they wished to be relieved of her care, they were advised 
by the Immigration Department to return her to Boston. She was committed to 
Division of Child Guardianship and held until an investigation could be made. 
She then went to an excellent aunt and her father will help provide for her. One 
boy of eighteen, an orphan, had a bad spinal trouble and was referred by the hos- 



22 P.D. 17. 

pital when he was ready for discharge. He had been caring for himself for ahnost 
two years, but had no place to go and was unable to work, lie also was in need 
of weekly hospital treatments. Another bo}', fourteen years, had been in a private 
institution all his life. He was a low grade feeble-minded unplaceable boy, and 
he could not remain with normal children. Nothing could be learned of his parent- 
age. A sixteen-year-old boy, illegitimate, was living in the home of his alleged 
father who was sent to jail for assault on his wife. She had to go to the hospital 
as a result and the boy was committed. His mother was located, and the boy 
sent to her in New York. 

Of these 76 children, the birthplaces of 14 were unknown; 1 was born in Canada, 
10 in other States, and 51 in ]\Iassachusetts. Unfortunately the data as to the 
birthplaces of the parents is very incomplete. In 42 instances we have no knowl- 
edge of the father. In 18 cases his birthplace was in a foreign country including 
2 in Canada. 14 in other States, and but one in Massachusetts. Of the mothers, 
the places of birth of 18 were unknown, 29 were born in foreign countries, 18 in 
other States and 11 in Massachusetts. The details of foreign-born mothers show 
7 born in Italy, 6 in Canada, 4 in Syria, 4 in Ireland, 2 each in Poland, Lithuania 
and Finland, and 1 each in Greece and the Azores. 

The section 22 commitment is used in dependent cases of no known settlement 
when it is impossible to get the signature of a legal guardian or relative responsible 
for the care of the child. Of these 76 children, abandonment was the reason for 
commitment in 28 cases. Full orphanage was the cause of 6 commitments. The 
removal of 1 parent by death and the other by desertion left 13 children unprovided 
for. In 1 case the mother was dead and the father insane, and in another the 
mother ill and father deserted. In 9 cases the mother was mentally defective, 
insane or feeble-minded (these were illegitimate children), and in 4 cases of legiti- 
mate children the mother was mentally unbalanced and the father had deserted. 
Two mothers are serving reformator}^ sentences and 1 child already mentioned was 
committed with its mother. 

Eleven children in this group had become wards as there were no relatives in 
this State to provide, but later plans were made to transfer them to relatives in 
other States. Occasionally, after commitment, investigation establishes a settle- 
ment or locates relatives who can make proper provision or be forced to support. 
In 20 of these cases arrangement has already been made for discharge or support 
has been obtained. In all possible cases the alleged father is forced to contribute 
to support. 

Following are the statistics of the Subdivision of Investigation: 

Applications pending Dec. 1, 1923 (Chapter 119, Section 38, General Laws) . . . 316 

Applications received ............ 1,016 

1,332 

Disposition as follows: 

Applications withdrawn ........... 92 

Advised only ............. 45 

Assumed by relatives and friends .......... 351 

Assumed by public agencies ........... 203 

Assumed by private agencies .......... 114 

Received (chapter 119, section 38, General Laws) ....... 304 

Pending Dec. 1, 1924 223 

1,332 

Applications for discharge pending Dec. 1, 1923 ........ 83 

Applications received ............ 160 

243 

Disposition as follows: 

Discharged .............. 149 

Discharge refused ............ 29 

AppUcations withdrawn ........... 32 

Pending Dec. 1, 1924 33 

243 

After-care: 

Cases pending Dec. 1, 1923 31 

New cases added ............. 60 

91 

Disposition as follows: 

Closed 50 

Pending Dec. 1, 1924 41 

91 

The receipts for contributory support of children in charge of the Division of 
Child Guardianship are shown in the folloT\dng table: 



Pt. I. 



23 



Collections received from Cities and Towns and directly from Parents. 



Year 



Direct 



Cities and 
Towns 



Total 



1913 . 

1914 . 

1915 . 

1916 . 

1917 . 

1918 . 

1919 . 

1920 . 

1921 . 

1922 . 

1923 . 

1924 . 



$6,999 30 
8,017 75 
7,106 88 
12,528 02 
16,620 52 
25.936 02 
34.084 65 
41,492 42 
33,258 83 
29,847 30 
31,800 51 
32,779 61 



$9,240 71 
11,496 87 
17,959 41 
21,828 07 
24,651 03 
28,545 45 
44,816 77 
57.433 73 
62.771 26 
62,623 99 
83,775 21 
77,703 60 



$16,240 01 
19.514 62 
25,066 29 
34.356 09 
41.271 55 
54,481 47 
78,901 42 
98,926 15 
96,030 09 
92,471 29 
115.575 72 
110.483 21 



Summary of Children under Three Years of Age. 








Dependent 


Neglected 


Grand 




Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls Total 


Total 


Number Dec. 1, 1923 

Received Dec. 1, 1923, to Nov. 30, 1924 


150 
101 


124 
90 


274 
191 


28 
21 


36 
21 


64 
42 


338 
233 


Total number in charge ..... 

Number transferred to department for children over 
three years of age ....... 

Number discharged and died ..... 


251 

60 
20 


214 

50 
34 


465 

110 
54 


49 

29 
4 


57 

18 
9 


106 

47 
13 


571 

157 
67 


Nimaber remaining Dec. 1, 1924 ..... 


171 


130 


301 


16 


30 


46 


347 



24 



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P.D. 17. 



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Pt. I. 25 

Status of Children over Three Years of Age in Custody during the Year ending 
■ November 30, 1924. 



Girls 



Boy 8 



In families, receiving wages 

In families, free of expense to State . 

In families, clothing only provided . 

In families, board and clothing provided 

In hospitals ..... 

In United States Service 

Married ..... 

Whereabouts unknown . 



Total number in charge Nov. 30, 1924 

Died 

Of age ....... 

Transferred to Lyman School for Boys 
Transferred to Industrial School for Boys 
Transferred to Industrial School for Girls 
Committed to Lyman School for Boys 
Committed to Industrial School for Boys . 
Committed to Industrial School for Girls . 
Committed to Massachusetts Reformatory, Concord 
Adopted ...... 

Discharged to place of settlement 

Discharged to Department of Mental Diseases 

Otherwise discharged .... 

Total number in custody during the year 



339 


461 


193 


335 


201 


73 


1,387 


1,608 


138 


102 




62 


32 


7 


13 


86 


2,303 


2,734 


9 


12 


112 


104 


— 


10 


— 


8 


6 




— 


16 


- 


11 


8 


— 




3 


28 


19 


2 


6 


31 


47 


153 


281 



2,652 



3,251 



Applications for Discharge. 



Pending New Granted Pending 

Dec. 1, Applica- Granted Refused Condi- With- Dec. 1, 

1923 tions tionally drawn 1924 



Neglected ..... 
Delinquent ..... 
Section 38, Chapter 119, General Laws 
Section 22, Chapter 119, General Laws 

Total 



15 


120 


23 


35 


58 


10 


9 


3 


24 


3 


7 


14 


— 


3 


14 


113 


64 


16 


27 


11 


9 


2 


35 


21 


6 


4 


2 


4 



34 



292 



111 



64 



103 



23 



25 



Discharges for adoption and transfers to industrial schools are not included in this table. 

Disposition by the Courts of Cases of Delinquent and Wayward Children. 



Number of Court notices received ...... 

Disposition of cases attended: 

Committed to Lyman School for Boys .... 

Committed to Lyman School for Boys and appealed 
Committed to Lyman School for Boys and sentence suspended 
Committed to Industrial School for Boys .... 

Committed to Industrial School for Boys and appealed 
Committed to Industrial School for Boys and sentence suspended 
Committed to Industrial School for Girls .... 

Committed to Industrial School for Girls and appealed 
Committed to Industrial School for Girls and sentence suspended 
Corrmiitted to Department of Public Welfare 
Committed to Department of Public Welfare and appealed . 
Committed to Department of Public Welfare and sentence suspended 
Committed to Massachusetts Reformatory, Concord . 
Committed to County Training Schools .... 

Committed to County Training Schools and appealed . 
Committed to County Training Schools and sentence suspended 
Committed to House of Correction and appealed 
Committed to House of Correction and sentence suspended . 
Committed to State Farm and appealed 
Held for Grand Jury 
Placed on Probation 

Fined 

Fined and appealed .... 
Fine suspended .... 

Continued ..... 
Continued in care of Department of Public 
Failed to appear .... 
Discharged ..... 
Dismissed ..... 

Placed on file ..... 
Appealed from finding 



Welfare 



5,790 



223 

81 

242 

145 

81 

342 

66 

18 

40 

43 

3 

4 

6 

60 

1 

21 

3 

1 

1 

63 

,932 

351 

19 

26 

,179 

41 

116 

347 

397 

976 

21 



Total number of cases attended 



6,849 



26 P.D. 17. 

Disposition by the Courts of Cases of Neglected Children. 

Number of Court notices received ............ 537 

Disposition of cases attended: 
Committed to Department of Public Welfare .... 
Committed to Department of Public Welfare and appealed . 
Committe<i to Department of Public Welfaxe and sentence suspended 
Committed to Child Welfare Division, Boston .... 
Committed to Child Welfare Division, Boston, and appealed 
Continued and placed in Home for Destitute Catholic Children 
Continued in charge of Department of Public Welfare 
Continued 
Dismissed 



Placed on file . 
Discharged 

Appealed from finding 
Failed to appear 



Total number of cases attendetl 



172 

7 



103 
67 

466 
12 
56 
11 
13 
20 



942 



Localities whence New Children were Received 



Abington, 2 
Acton, 1 
Acushnet, 1 
Adams, 1 
Amesbury, 2 
Arlington, 2 
Athol. 9 
Attleboro, 4 
Ayer, 1 
Barnstable, 3 
Belmont, 1 
Berkley, 1 
Beverly, 3 
Blackstone, 5 
Boston, 200 
JJrockton, 7 
Brookline, 1 
Cambridge, 29 
Charlton, 4 
Chelsea, 10 
Cheshire, 2 
Chester, 8 
Chicopee, 3 
CHnton, 1 
Cohasset, 3 
Concord, 5 



Dedham, 11 
Douglas, 2 
Easthampton, 
Edgar town, 2 
Everett, 4 
Fairhaven, 1 
Fall River, 7 
Fitchburg, 10 
Framingham, ( 
Franklin, 3 
Gardner, 7 
Gloucester, 4 
Greenfield, 4 
Haverhill, 9 
Holden, 1 
Holyoke. 13 
Lakeville, 4 
Lawrence, 32 
Lee, 1 
Leicester, 1 
Leominster, 4 
Lowell, 18 
Lynn, 35 
Maiden, 12 
Marblehead, 4 
Medford, 3 



Melrose, 3 
Methuen, 1 
Middleboro, 1 
Milford, 4 
Milton, 1 
Montague, 2 
Natick, 1 
Needham, 2 
New Bedford, 8 
Newburyport, 8 
Newton, 8 
North Adams, 3 
Northampton, 3 
Northboro, 1 
Northbridge, 7 
Peabody, 13 
Pembroke, 1 
Pittsfield, 18 
Plympton, 2 
Plymouth, 5 
Provincetown, 1 
Quincy, 2 
Randolph, 1 
Revere, 3 
Rockland, 1 
Rockport, 1 



Salem, 10 
Sharon, 1 
Sherborn, 5 
Somerville, 4 
Southbridge, 6 
Spencer, 5 
Springfield, 17 
Stoneham, 1 
Taunton, 4 
Tewksbury, 31 
Wakefield, 4 
Waltham, 5 
Wareham, 1 
Watertown, 1 
Wellesley, 1 
Westfield, 11 
Whitman, 1 
Winchester, 1 
Winthrop, 3 
Woburn, 3 
Worcester, 36 
Providence, R. 

Total, 767. 



1,7 



Licensed Boarding Houses for Infants. 

During the last official year 388 licenses to maintain boarding houses for infants 
were granted under the provisions of General Laws, chapter 119, section 2, in 93 
cities and towns, in addition to the 315 licenses in force at the expiration of the 
previous year; 308 expired by the one-year hmitation, 40 were cancelled (34 be- 
cause of changes of residence, 1 as boarcUng woman is to take up other employ- 
ment, 2 because of illness, 1 because of too many older children in the home, 1 
because of an infant under 2 in the family, and 1 because another license was to 
be granted increasing the number of children permitted); 34 were withdrawn; 9 
were refused; and 354 licenses, permitting the boarding of 748 infants in 93 cities 
and towns, remained in force November 30, 1924. 

These represent the licensed homes, not only of infants supported by the Com- 
monwealth, but also of those under the age of two years placed out by parents and 
many private agencies. 

During the past year, the State nurses have made 1,855 visits to infants placed 
in homes under private supervision, and the supervision of private societies. 
(Visits to infants under the supervision of the Department of Public Welfare are 
not included.) 

It has been necessary to take court action in private cases where laws governing 
the protection of infants (chapter 119) were wilfully violated, and strict supervision 
is being kept in many instances. 

The inspector of infant boarding houses made 295 visits during the year investi- 
gating complaints. Four babies were removed under the provisions of section 
28 of chapter 119 because removal was necessary to save their lives. 



Pt. I. 27 

Summary of Infants under Two Years of Age reported to the Department of Public 
Welfare from December 1, 1923, to November 30, 1924, under Chapter 119 of 
the General Laws, which provides for the Protection of Infants and the Licensing 
and Regulation of Boarding Houses for them. 



Supervision of — 



Number of 

Infants 
Reported 



Associated Charities, Pittsfield 

Avon Home, Cambridge 

Bethlehem Home, Taunton 

Board of Public Welfare, New Bedford 

Boston Children's Friend Society 

Boston Lying-in Hospital (Social Service Department) 

Brockton Catholic Charities Center . 

Catholic Charitable Bureau, Boston 

Child Welfare Division, City of Boston 

Child Welfare House, Lynn 

Children's Aid Association, Boston . 

Children's Bureau, Federated Jewish Charities, Boston 

Children's Mission to Children, Boston 

Church Home Society, Boston 

Division of Aid and Relief, State House, Boston 

Di\nsion of Child Guardianship, State House, Boston . 

Family Welfare Society, Quincy ... 

Family Welfare Society, Salem 

Florence Crittenton League of Compassion, Boston 

Girls' Parole Department, Boston 

Guild of St. Agnes, Worcester .... 

Hampden County Children's Aid Association 

Home for Friendless Women and Children, Springfield 

House of Mercy, Boston 

Lawrence Catholic Charities Centre 

LawTence City Mission . 

Lowell Catholic Charities Center 

Lynn Catholic Charities Center 

New Bedford Children's Aid Society 

New England Home for Little Wanderers, Boston 

New England Home for Little Wanderers, Pittsfield 

Northampton Children's Aid Association 

Order of St. Anne, Arlington . 

Overseers of the Poor, Acushnet 

Overseers of the Poor, Clinton 

Overseers of the Poor, Essex . 

Overseers of the Poor, Framingham 

Overseers of the Poor, Ljnn 

Overseers of the Poor, Springfield 

Overseers of the Poor, Templeton 

Overseers of the Poor, Westfield 

Overseers of the Poor, Worcester 

Police Women 

Private .... 

Probation OflBcers . 

St. Mary's Infant Asylum, Boston 

Salem CathoHc Charities Center ' 

Sisters of Providence, Holyoke 

Somerxille CathoUc Charities Center 

South End Chinese Mission, Boston 

TaUtha Cumi Home, Boston . 

Temporary Home and Day Nursery Society, Worcester 

Wachusett Children's Aid Society 

W^oonsocket Children's Home Association 

Worcester Children's Friend Society 



2 
23 
48 

3 
32 

2 
11 
61 
50 
21 
85 
29 

5 
24 

272 

2 

1 

32 

4 

10 

40 

12 

5 

14 

5 

13 

26 

28 

44 

11 

12 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

6 

1 

2 

1 

1 

2 

1,018 

11 

172 

8 

78 

5 

1 

61 

24 

14 

1 

62 

2,401 



The actual number of infants reported, less duplication of supervision, was 2,342. 
Of this number, 64 died, and 36 were adopted. 



28 



Ages at Death of 64 Infants Reported in Preceding Table. 



P.D. 17. ! 



Infants 



D /< 



Bethlehem Home, Tauntoa .... 
Children's Aid Society, Boston .... 
Boston Children's Friend Society 
Brockton Catholic Charities Center 
Child Welfare Division, City of Boston 
Division of Child Guardianship, State House, Boston 
Lowell Catholic Charitable Bureau 
Private ..... 
Probation Officers 
St. Mary's Infant Asylum, Boston 
Sisters of Providence, Holyoke . 
Talitha Cumi Home, Boston 
Wachusett Children's Aid Society 
Worcester Children's Friend Society 
Totals .... 



_ 


1 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


1 


• - 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


• - 


- 




1 


- 


- 


2 


- 


1 
2 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


4 


4 


10 


— 


1 


- 


— 


_ 


— 


— 


— 


1 


. 3 


1 


3 


1 


1 


- 


4 

1 


2 


15 
1 


9 


2 


1 


1 


- 


- 


2 


- 


8 


• - 


- 


1 


3 


2 


1 


8 


5 


19 
1 


■ - 


- 


1 


_ 


- 


- 


2 


- 


1 
2 


,-, 


6 


7 


6 


3 


2 


23 


12 


64 



Licensed Lying-in Hospitals, 1923-1924. 



Licenses in force Dec. 1, 1923 (in 95 towns) 
Expired ...... 

Surrendered and cancelled 

Revoked ...... 



115 
8 
1 



Continuing in force 
Reissues 
New issues 



100 
13 



222 



124 

98 



113 



Licenses in force Nov. 30, 1924 (in 95 towns) .......... 211 

Corporations . . . . . . . . .114 

Physicians ............... 24 

Registered nurses ............. 36 

Overseers of the Poor ............. 7 

Other persons .............. 30 

211 

Applications refused, 5. 

The inspector made 271 visits to hospitals and 74 visits to investigate com- 
plaints. 

The returns from a questionnaire mailed to each licensee show 35,729 cases 
deHvered in 226 hospitals, — deaths of mothers, 265; deaths of babies, 1,161; 
still-births, 1,520. 

Two hundred nine (209) notices of discharge from maternity hospitals of infants 
with inflamed eyes were received during the year. Twenty (20) of the 211 hospitals 
reported eye infection. 

The following table shows in detail the reports received in accordance ^\ith 
Rule 10 for the period from December 1, 1923, to November 30, 1924. 

Cases of Infants with Sore Eyes discharged from Lying-in Hospitals, December 1, 

to November 30, 192/+. 



Name of Lying-in Hospital 



Total 

Number Total 

of Cases Yearly 

Reported Births 



Beverly Hospital .... 
Boston Lying-in Hospital 
Brockton Hospital .... 
Burbank Hospital, Fitchburg . 
Cambridge Hospital 
Franklin County Hospital 
Stephen Henry Gale Hospital . 
Lowell Corporation Hospital . 
Maiden Hospital .... 
Melrose Hospital .... 
Mercy Hospital, Springfield 
Milford Hospital .... 
Massachusetts Homeopathic Hospital 
Newton Hospital .... 
Somerville Hospital 
St. Luke's Hospital, New Bedford 
Wesson Maternity Hospital, Springfield 
Worcester Hahnemann Hospital 
Worcester City Hospital 



215 

2,592 
419 
217 
534 
185 
233 
262 
473 
256 

1,076 
182 

1,649 
525 
246 
676 

1,114 
175 
649 



209 



11.618 



1 Prophylactic used in infants' eyes in every case was either silver nitrate 1 per cent or argyrol 15 to 20 
■per cent. 



Pt. I, 



29 



Tuition of Children under the Ca.re and Control of the Department. 
Under the operation of General Laws, chapter 76, sections 7 to 10, inclusive, 
governing reimbursements by the Commonwealth for tuition of State wards in 
public schools, bills received from 221 cities and towns, for the tuition and trans- 
portation of 3,103 children, amounting to $171,868.75, —viz., schooling $160,- 
980.67; transportation, $10,888.08 — were audited by the Department and paid 
by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth during the last official year. The location 
of the children was as follows: — 



Acton (1923), 3 


East Bridgewater, 20 


Medfield, 1 


Royalston, 3 


Acton (1924), 4 


East Brookfield, 1 


Medford, 50 


Rutland, 3 


Agawam, 1 


East Longnieadow, 1 


Med way, 29 


Salem. 13 


Amherst, 25 


Easthampton, 5 


Melrose, 35 


Salisbury (1923), 4 


Andover, 6 


Easton, 15 


Mendon, 16 


Salisbury (1924), 11 


Arlington, 18 


Enfield, 52 


Middleborough, 12 


Saugus, 11 


Ashfield, 3 


Everett, 31 


Middlefield, 12 


Savoy, 1 


Ashland, 4 


Fairhaven, 14 


Middleton, 3 


Sharon (1922), 2 


Athol (1923), 2 


Fall River, 10 


Milford. 47 


Sharon (1923), 6 


Athol (1924), 15 


Falmouth, 8 


Millis, 6 


Sharon (1924), 9 


Attleboro, 4 


Fitchburg. 7 


Milton, 3 


Shelburne, 5 


Ayer, 6 


Foxborough, 8 


Monson, 19 


Sherborn, 5 


Barnstable, 6 


Framingham, 41 


Montague, 4 


Shirley, 3 


Barre, 5 


Franklin, 19 


Montgomery, 7 


Somerset, 4 


Becket, 14 


Gardner, 4 


Nahant, 1 


Somerville, 49 


Belchertown, 16 


Georgetown, 10 


Natick, 23 


Southampton, 1 


Bellingham (1923), 18 


Gloucester, 7 


Needliam, 1 


Southborough, 21 


Bellingham (1924), 22 


Goshen (1923), 1 


New Ashford, 3 


Springfield, 24 


Belmont, 3 


Goshen (1924), 1 


New Bedford, 5 


Stoneham, 7 


Berkley, 1 


Grafton, 1 


New Salem (1923), 22 


Stoughton (1923), 35 


Berlin, 8 


Granby, 4 


Newburyport, 4 


Stoughton (1924), 49 


Bernardston, 8 


Greenfield, 11 


Newton, 55 


Sudbury, 5 


Beverly, 10 


Greenwich, 33 


North Adams, 8 


Sunderland (1923), 3 


Billerica, 4 


Groton, 16 


North Andover, 2 


Sunderland (1924), 5 


Bolton, 8 


Hadley, 3 


North Attleborough, 2 


Swampscott, 3 


Boston, 129 


Hampden, 15 


North Brookfield, 9 


Taunton, 20 


Boxboro. 1 


Hanover, 1 


North Reading, 1 


Templeton, 11 


Braintree, 11 


Hardwick, 15 


Northampton (1923), 4 


Tyngsborough, 3 


Brewster, 11 


Harwich, 11 


Northampton (1924), 4 


Upton, 17 


Bridgewater, 9 


Haverhill, 8 


Northborough, 9 


Uxbridge, 1 


Brimfield, 14 


Hawley, 33 


Norton, 13 


Wakefield, 42 


Brockton, 21 


Hingham (1923), 4 


Norwell, 2 


Walpole, 1 


BrookJine, 2 


Hinsdale (1923), 25 


Norwood, 12 


Waltham, 17 


Buckland, 10 


Holbrook, 1 


Oakham, 1 


Ware, 30 


Burlington, 3 


Holliston, 7 


Orange, 20 


Wareham, 22 


Cambridge, 69 


Holyoke, 5 


Orleans, 1 


Washington (1923), 8 


Canton, 16 


Hopedale, 10 


Otis, 3 


Watertown, 14 


Carlisle (1923), 4 


Hopkinton, 37 


Oxford (1923), 2 


Wayland, 4 


Carlisle (1924). 9 


Hubbardston, 3 


Oxford (1924), 6 


WeUesley, 6 


Charlemont, 8 


Hudson, 14 


Palmer, 16 


West Springfield, 5 


Charlton, 1 


Huntington, 4 


Peabody, 19 


Westborough, 5 


Chatham, 4 


Kingston, 3 


Pelham, 19 


Westfield, 10 


Chelmsford, 16 


LakeviUe (1923), 13 


Pembroke, 21 


Westford (1923), 5 


Chelsea, 13 


Lakeville (1924), 15 


Pepperell, 4 


Westford (1924), 7 


Cheshire, 6 


Lanesborough, 2 


Petersham, 4 


Weston, 7 


Chester, 9 


Lee. 2 


Phillipston, 8 


Weymouth, 17 


Chesterfield, 7 


Leominster, 10 


Pittsfield, 13 


Whitman, 24 


Chicopee, 11 


Lexington, 10 


Plainfield, 11 


Wilbraham, 12 


Colrain, 6 


Leyden, 10 


Plympton, 2 


Williamsburg, 23 


Concord, 13 


Lincoln, 12 


Prescott (1923), 17 


Williamstown, 12 


Conway, 17 


Littleton, 1 


Prescott (1924), 13 


Wilmington, 17 


Cummington, 2 


Lowell (1923), 27 


Provincetown, 9 


Winchendon, 5 


Dana, 18 


Lowell (1924), 38 


Quincy, 35 


Winchester, 8 


Danvers, 18 


Lynn (1923), 38 


Randolph, 18 


Winthrop, 6 


Dedham, 36 


Lynn (1924), 37 


Reading, 24 


Woburn (1923), 60 


Dighton, 5 


Maiden, 29 


Rehoboth, 5 


Woburn (1924), 91 


Douglas, 5 


Marblehead, 9 


Richmond, 2 


Worcester, 18 


Dover, 3 


Marion, 1 


Rockland, 18 


Worthington, 3 


Dracut, 6 


Marlborough, 46 


Rowe, 9 




Dunstable, 13 


Maynard, 4 


Rowley, 3 


Total, 3,103. 




DIVISION OF JUVENILE TRAINING 


•. 




Charles M. Davenport, Director. 






Robert J. Watson 


, Executive Secretary 




On November 30 


. 1924, the total number of children who were wards of the Trus- 


tees of Massachusetts Training Schools 


was 4,023, distributed as follows: 




SCHOOL 


In the On Tntnla 
Schools Parole ^^^^^ 


Lyman School for Boys 






445 1,794 2.239 


Industrial School for Boys .... 




262 814 1,076 


Industrial School for Gir 


Is ... . 




276 432 708 




983 3,040 4.023 



30 P.D. 17. 

During the year 1924 the numlDcr of commitments to the Lyman School for 
Boys decreased shghtly from the nmnber of commitments in 1923, while the In- 
dustrial School for Girls shows an increase of 35, or 30%, and the Industrial School 
for Boys shows a gain of 78 or 35%. The schools having an increase in the 
number of conmiitments, also show a higher number on November 30, 1924, as 
well as a higher daily average, while the Lyman School for Boys has a smaller num- 
ber on November 30, but a larger daily average than in 1923. 

The trustees have held 12 meetings during the year in addition to 38 meetings 
of various connnittees. Each request for the release or parole of a boy or girl is 
given careful and thorough attention by the trustees. A total of 142 separate 
visits have been made to the three schools by members of the Board of Trustees 
during the past j'ear. In addition to these visits made by the trustees, the execu- 
tive secretary of the Board has visited the three schools 58 times during the year. 
^^'hen a boy is ready for parole, the parole visitor investigates his home and makes 
a report to the trustees. If the boy's home seems to offer a fair chance of his suc- 
ceecling there on his return, the trustees will give him a trial at home. If he does 
not succeed, he will be returned to the school and then, perhaps, placed out with 
a family in the country until he seems worthy of another trial at home. 

The savings accounts of boys and girls on parole continue to grow. All boys 
and girls are urged to save in order that they may have something to start with 
when they reach the age of twentj'-one and pass out of the trustees' care. At the 
close of the year the Boys' Parole Branch reported a total balance on deposit of 
S37, 125.77, representing 851 accounts. This is a net gain of S6,337.19 over the 
previous year. The Girls' Parole Branch had a balance on deposit of $20,968.54 
for the corresponding period, representing 572 accounts, $1,253.86 less than the 
balance in 1923. 

Boys' Parole Branch. 

John J. Smith, Superintendent. 

During the j^ear ending November 30, 1924, the fourteen visitors made a total of 
more than 15,000 visits, 7,000 of which were to Lyman School boj's under eighteen 
years of age. Boys of this age need more constant and closer supervision than 
bo3''S between eighteen and twentj'-one. The Lj^man School boys over eighteen, 
however, were not neglected, for more than 3,400 visits were made to them. Forty- 
nine hundred visits were made to those on parole from the Industrial School. 

A ^isit does not mean simply caUing at a boy's own home or foster home. The 
visitor spends much time on each visit, inquiring into the boy's conduct, his school 
or work record, as the case may be, and the manner in which he spends his leisure 
time. To the boy paroled in a foster home the coming of a visitor means much. 
If he is at all dissatisfied he can talk freely to his visitor, whereas he might not 
care to write so fully. The visitor checks up the boy's clothing, to see that he is 
properly outfitted for all sorts of weather, and orders whatever seems necessary. 
The care given to outfits of boys in foster homes explains, in a great measure, the 
small amount of sickness which we have among these wards. 

An important part of a visitor's work is the investigation of homes of boys 
committed to LjTuan School or to the Industrial School for Boys. Not only does 
he send in a complete report shortl}^ after the commitment of the boy from his 
district, but before the boy is ready for parole he again sends in a report, more 
brief in form, but giving the essential facts concerning the boy's home. These 
first investigations take a great deal of time. Different agencies which have 
known the family have to be consulted. Probation officers, police officers and 
others who have had dealings with the boy are seen, and a personal investigation 
of the home is made. In many cases this personal investigation can be made only 
at night, when parents have returned home from work. 

The record of the boys on parole for the year has been quite satisfactory. Of the 
1,794 boys on parole from Ljonan School on November 30, 1924, 78% were doing 
well, while of the 814 boys on parole from the Industrial School for Boys nearly 75% 
were doing well. Considering poor business conditions and the consequent un- 
rest, we may feel justifiably proud of these percentages. 

There were 309 boys returned to the Lyman School for violation of parole dur- 
ing the year ending November 30, 1924, as compared with. 349 returned during the 



Pt. I. 31 

previous year, and 82 were returned to the Industrial School for Boy? for violation 
of parole, as compared with 98 returned during the fiscal year 1923. 

Girls' Parole Branch. 

Miss Almeda F. Cree, Superintendent. 

The big mission of the Girls' Parole Branch is to instruct, encourage and inspire, 
not only the girls themselves, but their employers and relatives as well. 

This can be accomplished only by individual work — parole work should always 
be individual. The girls must be taught to think for themselves. All plans 
should be worked out with the girl and not merely for her. A theory ever so prac- 
tical is of value only so far as the girl herself understands and accepts it, and co- 
operates in the work the Parole Branch is trying to do for her. 

Before a girl is placed on parole, she is interviewed at the school by the super- 
intendent of the Parole Branch, by the visitor to whom she has previously been 
assigned, and by the visitor who has charge of the placing of girls. These inter- 
views are for the purpose of explaining thoroughly to the girl what will be expected 
of her, and what she has a right to expect of all associated with her. 

To find the variety of homes to meet the varied needs of the different classes of 
girls takes much concentrated thought and effort. 

One marvels at the patience and motherly interest manj^ of our foster mothers 
display toward the girls, and some develop a wonderful skill in bringing out the 
best in a girl. It is through the high standards of a wholesome home that the 
girls learn the right principles of living. 

The Parole Branch has been able to do much more constructive work this year 
than formerly, as it has not had the untrained mother on parole with her illegiti- 
mate child. The mother has been returned to the school for training and her 
bab}^ has been placed ^\ath relatives or with some child-caring organization. 

The districting of the State whereby each visitor is given a territory of her 
own where her girls maj^ be grouped, has worked out most satisfactorily. Each 
visitor has been assigned a large district at a distance from Boston together with 
a small district near Boston. The nearby districts are for hospital cases and for 
girls newly paroled from the School, who must be visited frequently at first. As 
these girls improve physically and morally, they are moved to the distant district. 

It would be a great pity to lose the splendid opportunities that our country 
village homes offer. There the girls can enter into the church and neighborhood 
activities in ways which are not possible in the city or nearby home. 

The records show that 550 more visits have been made this year than last year. 

The success of the placing work is shown by the length of time girls have re- 
mained wdth the same employers; fifty-four girls remained in the same foster homes 
from 1 to 2 years; twelve from 2 to 3 years; four from 3 to 4 years, and three from 
4 to 5 years ; making seventy-three girls who completed at least a year's stay in 
the same foster home. Thirtv-nine girls were in the same housework positions 
from December 1, 1923, to December 1, 1924. 

Although 622 individual girls have been in the care of the parole branch through 
the year, only 43, or 7%, have been returned to the school for violation of parole. 

Ninety girls passed out of the care of the Trustees by reaching their majority. 
The conduct of 82.8% was good; that of 7.1% was unsatisfactory; that of 10% 
was unknown, being runaways or out of the State. Of the girls who reached their 
majority, 42.2% were married and the conduct of 80% of them was good. 

Sixty-nine of the girls on parole November 30, 1924, were married. If a girl 
marries under 21 years of age, she does not pass out of the care of the Trustees nor 
does she cease to need her visitor. 

The Trustees have honorably discharged 46 girls this year — 15 more than in 
any previous year. The average age at the time of discharge was 20 years and 
6 months. The youngest was 18 years and 11 months; the oldest, 20 years and 
10 months. 

HOUSING AND TOWN PLANNING. 

Edward T. Hartman, Visitor to Planning Boards. 

Miss Miriam I. Ross, Secretary. 

Ten boards have been established or reorganized during 1924, while seven report 

inactivity for the year, and one has ceased to exist, making the total number of 



32 P.D. 17. 

active planning boards in Massachusetts on December 1, 1924, sixty-eight. Boards 
not reporting but which are known to be active have been left in the active list. 

Of the active boards, eighteen are in towns of less than 10,000 inhabitants, 
where the law is permissive.. Small towns are waking up to the fact that the 
best time to plan is before a })lace is ruined with injurious developments and at 
least twenty more of these smaller places are working for the formation of planning 
boards. 

To facilitate their establishment the division has prepared and printed a leaflet 
on planning boards and their work. In this bulletin is outlined the powers and 
duties of planning boards, with emphasis on the needs of zoning and building lines 
and the methods of obtaining both. 

Earlier in the year a similar bulletin on the nature of the work which should be 
done by planning boards was published by the Massachusetts Federation of 
Planning Boards (Bulletin No. 13). This is already out of print. 

Zoning. 

Twenty-four cities and towns are now protected by zoning and twenty-eight 
places are at work on zoning plans, many of which will be presented for adoption 
at spring town meetings. 

Repeated requests for information on how to zone decided the division to issue 
in printed form an outUne of steps in the order in which they should be taken by 
planning boards anxious to work in a logical way. This was Bulletin No. 2 of 
the division and covers the technique of zoning. 

Court Decisions Affecting Zoning. 
In October four decisions were handed down by the Supreme Judicial Court of 
Massachusetts. These decisions uphold three principles of zoning: — the so-called 
interim ordinance, the exclusion of stores from residence districts, and the single- 
family residence district. Full details of these decisions will be found in the report 
of the division published separately. 

Annual Conference. 

The eleventh annual conference of Massachusetts planning boards was held in 
Worcester on October 6. At this meeting the registered attendance was 103, 
representing 37 planning boards, officials, teachers and interested individuals. 

The morning session was devoted to reports on the work of the year with special 
reports on regional planning in the Connecticut Valle}^, zoning as a civic awakener, 
and zoning for one family districts in Brookline. 

At the afternoon session Mr. Philip Nichols outlined a plan for protecting the 
city plan. His speech was printed as Federation Bulletin 16. 

A special feature of the afternoon session was the question box conducted by 
the Hon. Edward M. Bassett. The questions were mainly on zoning and Mr. 
Bassett's clear, decisive answers helped to clear up many details. 

During the evening the stories of Boston and Worcester zoning were told and 
Mr. Bassett again talked on the general subject of zoning and whj^ we need it, 
outUning briefly New York's experience and the rapid development of zoning in 
this country since New York accepted her law in 1916. 

New England Regional Planning. ■ 
A movement for the regional planning of New England has been started by the 
Federation of Planning Boards. The matter was presented to the Governors of 
New England at their annual conference. At a conference held on October 7, 
Rhode Island, New Hampshire and Massachusetts were represented and the fol- 
lowing points were discussed and agreed upon: 

That the agencies already at work should be brought into closer relationship; 
that a survey should be made of the resources of New England, similar to that 
being made for New Hampshire as a State; that natural resources were the things 
largely going to waste and needing the most attention. 



Pt. I. 33 

The table below shows the present status of planning boards in Massachusetts 
cities and towns. Detailed statements of the work of these boards will be found 
in the report of the division published separately. 



AcrrvE Bo 


ARDS — 68 


Inactive, 1924 — 


7 


No Boards — 9 


Amesbury 




Melrose 


Cambridge 
Mansfield 




Adams 


Amherst ^ 




Methuen 




Beverly 


Arlington 




Milford 


New Bedford 




Chelsea 


Attleboro 




Milton 1 


Northampton 




Danvers 


Bedford ' 




Natick 


Reading 




Greenfield 


Belmont 




Needham i 


Revere 




Marlborough 


Boston 




Newton 


Southbridge 




Newburyport 


Bourne ^ 




North Adams 






Northbridge 


Braintree 




Norwood 






Peabody 


Brockton 




Paxton 1 








Brookline 




Pittsfield 








Chicopee 




Plymouth 








Clinton 




Quincy 








Dedham 




Salem 








Easthampton 




Saugus 








Everett 




Somerville 








Fairhaven i 




Springfield 








Fall River 




Stoneham i 








Falmouth i 




Stoughton 1 








Fitchburg 




Taunton 








Fraraingham 




W^akefield 








Gloucester 




Walpole 1 








Great Barrington i 




Waltham 








Haverhill 




Watertown 








Hingham ^ 




Webster 








Holyoke 




Wellesley i 








Lawrence 




Westfield 








Leominster 




Weston 1 








Lexington ^ 




West Springfield 








Longmeadow ^ 




Weymouth 








Lowell 




Winchester 








Lynn 




Winthrop 








Maiden 




Woburn 








Medford 




W'orcester 












1 Towns under 10,000 population. 






The table below hsts the cities and towTis which have 


been zoned. 


Brockton 


November, 1920 


Holyoke 


September, 1923 


Springfield . 


December, 1921 (Interim) 


Maiden 


December, 1923 (Interim) 




December, 1922 (Final) 


Cambridge . 


January, 1924 


Winthrop 


March, 1922 


Winchester . 


March, 1924 


Brookline 


May 


1922 


Lexington . 


March, 1924 


Milton 


July. 


1922 


Melrose 


March. 1924 


Longmeadow 


July. 


1922 


Swampscott 


April 


1924 


North Adams 


September, 1922 (Interim) 


Haverhill 


April 


1924 (Interim) 


Newton 


December, 1922 


Dedham 


May, 


1924 


Worcester . 


March, 1923 (Interim) 


Arlington 


May, 


1924 




December, 1924 (Final) 


Medford . 


May. 


1924 (Interim) 


LoweU 


April 


, 1923 (Interim) 


Boston 


June, 


1924 


West Springfield . 


May 


1923 


Chelsea 


June, 


1924 (Interim) 



Housing Experiment at Lowell. 

The condition of the housing experiment at Lowell remains unchanged wdth 
pajTiients on the houses erected going on regularly. 

A statement of the money spent and the money paid back into the State Treasury 
is as follows: 

Appropriation (made in 1917) S50,000 00 

Expenses : 

Land purchased. 7 acres with room for 40 houses, including also 1 house 



standing on lot 
Cost of 12 houses 
Improvements 



.$12,500 00 

>8,128 77 
2.626 77 



S43.255 54 
Balance returned to State Treasury .......... $6,744 46 

The persons who have bought the houses have paid back to the Commonwealth 
821,931.81 in monthly instalments, that is 



Interest 
Principal 



$8,415 75 
13,516 06 



The pajTnents on the principal which remain unpaid on December 1 
amount to $23,158.29. 



$21,931 81 

1924, 



34 



P.D. 17. 



THE FIVE INSTITUTIONS. 



A brief statement relating to the general supervision of each institution will 
be followed by comparative and more detailed consideration of financial adminis- 
tration. 

THE STATE INFIRMARY, TEWKSBURY. 

John H. Nichols, M.D., Superintendent. 
Trustees. 
Mr. Galen Jj. Stone, Brookline, Chairman. 
Mrs. Nellie E. Talbot, Brookline, Secretary. 
Mrs. Mar}^ E. Cogan, Stoneham. 
Francis W. Anthon.y, M.D., Haverhill. 
IVIr. Dennis D. Sullivan, Middleborough. 
Mr. Walter F. Dearborn, Caml)ridge. 
G. Forrest Martin, M.D., Lowell. 
Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $2,373,041.91. 
Normal capacity of plant, 2,775. Value per unit of capacity, $855.15. 
Provides almshouse and hospital care for indigent persons not chargeable for 
support to an}^ cit}^ or town. 

Numher.'i. 

Males Females Total 



Number Dec. 1, 1923 
Admitted during year 
Discharged during year . 
Remaining Nov. 30. 1924 
Individuals under care during year . 
Daily average inmates during year . 
Daily average employees during year 
Largest census during year 
Smallest census during year 



1,157 


930 


2,087 


2,311 


776 


3,087 


2,057 


687 


2,744 


1,111 


1.019 


2,430 


— 


— 


5,174 


1,273 


1,012 


2,285 


173 


239 


412 


- 


- 


2,488 


- 


- 


2,088 



The condition of unemploj'^ment which recurs this year is emphasized by the 
increase of 204 or 10%, in the dailj'- average number. The number of cases cared 
for during the year increased 764 or 27%. The larger part of this increase — 707 
— was in the number of males. 

Of the 4,337 cases treated in the general hospital wards, there were 3,202 males 
and 1,135 females. Included in the above cases were 2 of scarlet fever, 8 of whoop- 
ing cough, 7 of diphtheria, 4 of influenza and 5 of erysipelas. There were 311 cases 
of alcohoUsm, 172 more than in 1923. Of the 438 deaths, 391 were in the general 
hospital department. Of these 4,337 cases cared for 1,231 were discharged well, 
507 were relieved, 507 were not relieved, 391 died, and 1,701 remained in the in- 
stitution. 

Of the 467 cases of pulmonary tuberculosis in the consumptive ward, 397 cases 
w^ere males and 70 females. The condition of the 270 patients discharged was as 
follows: 5 arrested, 116 relieved, 70 not relieved, 79 died. 

Of the 155 births at this institution during the year, 90 were males and 65 were 
females. Of this number there were 149 living births, namely, 88 males and 61 
females. Concerning the mothers of these children, 112 were born in the United 
States, 2 in Ireland, 26 in the British Provinces, and 15 in other countries. 

For an account of the work of the Department of Public Welfare with mother 
and bab}^ cases at this institution see page 14. 

In the insane department of this institution there was a daily average during 
the year of 737 persons, 220 males and 517 females. There were 47 deaths. 

With an appropriation of $846,800 plus $5,945.47 brought forward from balance 
of 1923, the total amount available for maintenance was $852,745.47. Of this 
amount, $847,061.62 was expended. Of the amount expended, $348,665.99 was 
for salaries, wages and labor; all other expenses, $498,395.63. Weekly per capita 
cost of maintenance, computed on expense less sales and refunds from maintenance, 
87.051. Total receipts from all sources other than the State Treasury, $91,635.59. 
Net cost of maintenance to the Commonwealth, $755,426.03. Ratio of daily aver- 



Pt. I. 35 

age number of persons employed to daily average number of inmates, 1 to 5.5. 
The Trustees estimate that $958,482 will be necessary for maintenance in 1925. 

There has been added to the Administration Building a comfortable reception 
room, as an extension of the central hallway. An extension to the buildings for 
nurses and for matrons, containing 3G new rooms, was added. There have also 
been added to the men's and women's hospital department 16 new hospital wards, 
with a combined capacity of 285 beds. 

A marked general improvement in the condition of repair of the older buildings 
is noted and it is essential that still more should be done to bring these buildings 
up nearer the standards of the new wards. 

The overcrowding in the men's pavilion during the winter months is a matter 
of seriousness which is especiallj" apparent at the present moment. 

For the coming year the trustees submit the following estimate with a request 
for special appropriations covering the same: 

1. Storage Extension ............. $32,285 

2. Employees' Quarters ............. 57,439 

3. Industrial Building 60,973 

$150,697 

ALMSHOUSE DEPARTMENT AT THE STATE FARM, BRIDGEWATER. 

Under Department of Correction. 
Henry J. Strann, Superintendent. 
Provides almshouse care for indigent persons not chargeable to any city or town. 
The data following are for the fiscal j^ear ending September 30, 1924: 

Ahimbers. 

Males Females Total 

Number Oct. 1, 1923 

Admitted during year ......... 

Discharged during year ......... 

Remaining Sept. 30, 1924 

Individuals under care during year ....... 

Daily average inmates during year ....... 

Largest census during ye^ir ........ 

Deaths during year ......... 

LYMAN SCHOOL FOR BOYS, WESTBOROUGH. 

Charles A. Keeler, Superintendent. 
Trustees of Massarhusetts Trainirig Schools. 

Mr. James W. McDonald, Marlborough, Chairman. 

Miss Mary Josephine Bleakie, Brookline. 

Mr. Matthew Luce, Cohasset. 

Mr. Clarence J. McKenzie, Winthrop, V ice-Chairman. 

Miss Amy Ethel Taylor, Lexington. 

Mr. Charles M. Davenport, Boston. 

Mr. James D. Henderson, Brooldine. 

Mr. Irvin McDowell Garfield, Boston. 

Mr. Eugene T. Connolly, Beverly. 

Mr. Robert J. Watson, 41 Mt. Vernon Street, Boston, Executive Secretary. 

Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $742,219.33. Normal capacity, 450. 
Value per unit of capacity, SI, 649. 37. 

Provides custodial care and industrial training for delinquent boys under fifteen 
years of age. Cottage plan. 

Numbers. 

Males Females Total 

Number Dec. 1, 1923 450 - 450 

Admitted during year 793 - 793 

Discharged during year ......... 798 - 798 

Remaining Nov. 30. 1924 445 - 445 

Individuals under care during year ....... 1,243 - 1,243 

Daily average inmates during year ....... 463.26 - 463.26 

Daily average employees during year . . . . . . 58.57 44.65 103.23 

Largest census during year ........ 510 - 510 

Smallest census during year ........ 431 - 431 



214 


- 


214 


245 


_ 


245 


220 


- 


220 


239 


— 


239 


459 


- 


459 


238 


- 


238 


263 


— 


263 


61 


- 


61 



36 P.D. 17 

The list of causes of admission in the 793 cases received during the year was sa 
follows: breaking and entering, 86; delinquent child, 25; larceny, 107; returnee 
from leave of absence, 13; returned from hospitals, 65; returned from places 
851; running away, 15; stubbornness, 32; runaway's captured, 75; receiving stoler 
goods, 1; immorality, 3: using motor vehicle without authority, 13; cruelty tc 
animals, 1; assault and battery, 4; carrying firearms, 2. 

Two hundred eighty-nine of the foregoing cases were committed by the courts 
Of this number, 228 had been arrested before, and 53 had been inmates of othei 
institutions. Twenty-six, or 9%, were of American parentage; 173, or 59%, wer( 
foreign born; and 30 were unlcnown. Twenty-two of the boys were foreign born 
\\-hile 264 were born in the United States. 

Of the new commitments this year, 71 boys were eleven years of age or under 
These young boys are taken care of in two cottages, one 7 miles and the other c 
miles from the main school. They do not mingle with the older boys. 

The average length of stay in Lyman School of boys paroled for the first time 
during the year ending November 30, 1924, was 12.22 months. 

Of the 798 cases discharged or released during the year, 361 were released or 
parole to parents or relatives; on parole to persons other than relatives, 163 
boarded out, 77; runaways, 90; sent to hospitals, 67; transferred to other insti- 
tutions, 26; granted leave of absence, 14. 

With an appropriation of $224,575, a total of $215,366.74 w^as expended for the 
maintenance of this institution. Of the amount expended, $101,175.37 was foi 
salaries, wages and labor; all other expenses, $114,191.37. Weekly per capita 
cost of maintenance, computed on expense less sales and refunds from maintenance 
S8.855. Total receipts from all sources other than the State treasury, $1,313.60, 
Net cost of maintenance to the Commonwealth, $214,053.14. Ratio of dail^; 
average number of persons employed to daily average number of inmates, 1 to 4.4, 
The Trustees estimate that $237,522.75 wiU be necessary for maintenance in 1925, 

The boys spend one half of each day in some educational work which Avill be oJ 
service to them when they leave the school. The carpentry class teaches sufficient 
knowledge of carpentry so that many have left the school to work with building 
and manufacturing firms. The printing class issues a school paper regularly. 
The shoe department manufactures all the shoes and slippers for the school and 
for the Industrial School for Boys. 

For the coming year the Trustees submit the follo^\dng estimate, mth request 
for a special appropriation covering the same: — 



Chapel and assembly building, with furnishings and equipment; for service connections to 
school building; and for rearrangement of partitions in school building to provide more 
schoolrooms .............. 



$50,00( 



INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, SHIRLEY. 

George P. Campbell, Superintendent. 
Trustees of the Massachusetts Training Schools. 
Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $621,276.81. Normal capacity oi 
plant, 290. Value per unit of capacity, $2,142.33. 

Provides custodial care and industrial training for boys over fifteen and under 
twenty-one years of age. Only boys under eighteen may be admitted. 

Numbers. 



Males 



Females Total 



Number Dec. 1, 1923 
Admitted during year 
Discharged during year . 
Remaining Nov. 30, 1924 
Individuals under care during year . 
Daily average inmates during year . 
Daily average employees during year 
Largest census during year 
Smallest census during year 



224 


- 


224 


425 


— 


425 


387 


_ 


387 


262 


_ 


262 


546 


- 


546 


253.36 


_ 


253.36 


52.71 


18.17 


70.88 


279 


_ 


279 


223 


- 


223 



The list of causes of admission in the 425 cases received during the year was as 
follows: assault, 6; assault and battery, 4; robbery, 4; breaking and entering. 



P:.I. 37 

38; breaking, entering and larceny, 41; larceny, 82; attempt to break and enter, 
6; carrying concealed weapons, 3; stubborn, disobedient and delinquent, 39; 
violating auto laws, 6; violating rules of training schools. 3; vagrancy, 5; drunk- 
enness, 3; attempted larceny, 4; setting fires, 1 ; unlawful appropriation of auto- 
mobiles, 28; transfers, 24; returned from parole, 92; returned from leave, 8; 
idle and disorderly, 4; returned from hospital, 4; maUcious injury to personal 
property, 3; runaways, 8; returned from Eye and Ear Infirmary, 1; unlawful 
appropriation of horse, 2; malicious mischief, 2; receiving stolen goods, 1; assault 
with dangerous weapon, 1 ; forgery, 1 ; committing unnatural act, 1 . 

Two hundred ninety-six of the foregoing cases were conamitted by the courts, 
and 24 were transferred from L3^man School. Of the boys thus committed, 274 
had been in court before, and 86 had been inmates of other institutions. Thirty- 
four, or 10.6%, were foreign born; 282, or 88.1%, were born in the United States. 
Sixty were of American parentage, 154 of foreign parentage, and 36 were of un- 
known parentage. The average length of stay of boys in the school was 10 months. 
The average population of 253.36 was more than the average of the preceding 
year by 42.55. 

The school has, since its inception, recognized the essential need of individualiza- 
tion in the training of delinquents. It is obvious that they are, for the most part, 
the by-product of an unfortunately rigid system of education, in the school, the 
home, and ever^^where else, which assumes a uniform average need and capacity, 
— souls lost in the maze of the demands and difficulties of modern life, particularly 
that of our larger cities and towns. These lads find themselves out of joint with 
the world about them. 

Most of these boys are well developed physically, and need much work to take 
care of their surplus energy. The offences for which many of them are commi^^ted 
are very serious, and require a strenuous effort to keep the bo^'S from developing 
into criminals. The boys do a great part, of the work about the large farm, and 
during the past year succeeded in supplying the greater part of all the food used in 
the school. 

Of the 387 boys discharged or released during the year, 213 were paroled; re- 
turned paroles placed out, 88; granted leave of absence, 8; transferred to Massa- 
chusetts Reformatory, 19; transferred to State Farm, 4; transferred to other in- 
stitutions, not penal, 10; returned to court on habeas ^\Tit, 7; absent without 
leave, 35; discharged, 1; returned to U. S. Army, 1; died, 1. 

With an appropriation of 8142,400 plus $4,047.12 brought forward from balance 
of 1923 the amount available for maintenance was $146,447.12. Of this amount 
$140,339.92 was expended. Of the amount expended, $63,620.47 was for salaries, 
wages and labor; all other expenses, $76,719.45. Weekly per capita cost of main- 
tenance, computed on expense less sales and refunds from maintenance, $10,530. 
Total receipts from afi sources other than the State treasury, $959.12. Xet cost 
of maintenance to the Commonwealth, $139,380.80. Ratio of daily average num- 
ber of persons employed to daily average number of inmates, 1 to 3.5. The trus- 
tees estimate that $167,746.66 will be necessary for maintenance in 1925. 

STATE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, LANCASTER. 

Catharine M. Campbell, Superintendent. 
Trustees of the Massachusetts Training Schools. 

Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $483,466.27. Normal capacity of 
Dlant, 268. Value per unit of capacity, $1,803.98. Founded in 1854 as a private 
nstitution. Taken over by the State in 1856. 

Provides custodial care and industrial training for delinquent girls under seven- 
:een years of age at time of commitment. 



38 



Numbers. 



P.D. 17. 



Males Females Total 



Number Deo. 1. 1923 
AdmiiteU duriug year 
Discharged duriuR year 
Uemaiiiiiig Nov. 30, 1924 
ludividualii under cjire during >c;u 
Daily average iumate^j during year . 
Daily average employees during yetir 
Largest ceJisus during year 
Smalletit ceuaua during year 



23 



243 


243 


286 


286 


253 


253 


276 


276 


529 


529 


272.86 


272.86 


52 


75 


290 


290 


244 


244 



The list of causes of admission for 151 commitments of the 286 cases received at 
the school durhig the year was as follows: delinquent, 12; adultery, 1; fornica- 
tion, 9; idle and disorderly, 4; larceny, 15; lewdness, 11; stubbornness, 53; 
transferred from Department of PubUc ^^'elfare, 3; runaway, 14; vagrancy, 1; 
delinquent child and fornication, 1; delinciuent, idle and disorderly, 1; dehn- 
cjuent ami larceny, 1; delinciuent and lewdness, 6; delinciuent and lewd, wanton, 
lascivious person in speech and behavior, 3; lewd, wanton and lascivious person 
in speech and behavior, 4; lewd and lascivious person in speech and behavior, 3; 
delinquent and runaway, 2; stubborn and delinquent child, 2; stubborn and dis- 
obedient child, 3; waywartl, lewdness, 2. 

Recalled to the school, 135; for running away from Industrial School, 2; from 
hospital, 29; for a visit home, 1; from attending court, 5; from attending funeral, 
3; visits from paroled girls, 18; pending investigation of home conditions, 6; to 
await coimnitment to institution for feeble-minded, 2; for medical care, 20; to 
await place, 2; for further training, 1; for violation of parole, 46. 

Of the 253 girls chscharged or released during the year, 63 were released on parole 
to parents or relatives; on parole to other famiUes for wages, 114; on parole to 
other families to attend school, 11; from a visit at the school, 17; ran from In- 
dustrial School, 2; transferred to hospitals, 29; to be committed to School for the 
Feeble-Minded, 1; to attend court, 5; to attend funeral, 3; for a visit home, 1; 
transferred to House of the Good Shepherd, 1 ; to be committed to Insane Hospi- 
tal, 1; to be committed to Keformatorj'- for Women, 5. 

The average length of stay in the school of all girls paroled for the first time 
during the year ending November 30, 1924, was 1 year, 8 months and 24 days. The 
longer period of training as compared with that in the boys' schools enables the 
superintendent to know the pupils better; gives an opportunity for more efficient 
training; and increases their chances of making good on parole. 

The newly coimnitted girl is first admitted to the hospital where she remains 
for observation and attention for forty-eight hours. From here she is assigned to 
the Receiving Cottage where a most efficient matron, with an excellent corps of 
assistants, is in charge. The girl is here taught personal cleanliness, simple house- 
hold tasks and model sewing, and is given school instruction three hours each day. 
During her stay of three months in this cottage, the greatest effort is made to insure 
her comfort, happiness, and confidence. When she has successfully completed 
this preliminary instruction she is transferred to one of the seven training cottages, 
and her industrial and academic instruction in the general school building begins. 

A se^'en months' course of general kitchen training is arranged for the girl after 
she has been at the school from eight to nine months. She receives practical in- 
struction and experience in washing and ironing, making and baking of bread, 
and the cooking and serving of meals. 

As far as is possible each girl makes for herself a complete outfit of clothing to 
be taken with her when given her parole from the school. 

Girls who fail on parole are returned to the school and are sent to a special cot- 
tage where fewer pri\'ileges are accorded, heavier tasks assigned, and a more strict 
discii)line is maintained than is required of the girls in regular training. 

With an appropriation of S142.100 a total of $132,776.31 was expended for the 
maintenance of this institution in 1924. Of the amount expended, $58,904.68 
was for salaries, wages and labor; all other expenses $73,871.63. Weekly per 
capita cost of maintenance, computed on expense less sales and refunds from main- 



Pt. I. 39 

tenance, $9,292. Total receipts from all sources other than the State treasury, 
$331.31. Net cost of maintenance to the Commonwealth, $132,445. Ratio of 
daily average number of persons employed to daily average number of inmates, 
1 to 3.6. The Trustees estimate that $152,432 will be necessar}^ for maintenance 
in 1925. 

For the coming year, also, a request for a special appropriation is asked to cover 
the following: 



Certain land for farming 



$4,900 



MASSACHUSETTS HOSPITAL SCHOOL, CANTON. 

John E. Fish, M.D., Superintendent. 
Trustees. 
Edward H. Bradford, M.D., Boston, Chairman. 
Mr. George H. ElUs, Newton. 
Mr. Walter C. Baylies, Taunton. 
Mr. WilUam F. Fitzgerald, Brookline. 
Mr. Andrew Marshall, Boston. 
Opened December 1, 1907. Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $683,- 
752.30. Normal capacity of plant, 464. Value per unit of capacity, $1,473.60. 

Provides care and schoohng for crippled and deformed cliildren. Crippled and 
deformed children of the Commonwealth between ages of five and fifteen, and men- 
tally competent to attend the public schools, are eligible for admission to the 
school. 

In addition to the school department, the Bradford Infirmary, completed in 
October, 1922, takes care of acute surgical and medical cases occurring in the 
children under the Division of Child Guardianship of the Department of Public 
Welfare. See Chapter 121, section 35, of the General Laws. 

Numbers. 

Males Females Total 



Number Dec. 1, 1923 
Admitted during year 
Discharged during year . 
Remaining Nov. 30, 1921 
Individuals under care during year 
Daily average inmates during year 
Daily average employees during year 
Largest census during year 
Smallest census during year 



136 


139 




275 


259 


214 




473 


260 


196 




456 


135 


157 




292 


_ 


— 




748 


137.75 


157. 


29 


295.04 


36 


71 




107 








336 


- 


- 




191 



The organization of an Alumni Association which has been formed by a number 
of graduates of the institution, promises to be of importance not only as giving 
evidence of the practical results obtained from the institution, but also as an oppor- 
tunity to stimulate the care of crippled children throughout the Commonwealth. 
Two hundred and twenty-nine have been given a school diploma and have formed 
themselves into an alumni association and it is proposed with the increasing num- 
bers of our graduates to establish units in the different parts of the Commonwealth. 
With organized and stated meetings these groups can be used as agencies for giving 
supervision and help to graduates of the school seeking employment. 

There were in the institution on November 30, 1923, 275 children, — 238 in the 
school division, and 37 sick minor wards. There have been admitted 473 children, — 
68 to the school and 405 for hospital care only. The whole number under treat- 
ment during the year was 748. The maximum number at any one time was 336, 
the minimum 191, and the daily average for the year 295.04. The discharges 
numbered 456, — 389 from hospital care and 67 from the school, leaving in the 
institution at the end of the year 292, — 239 school cases and 53 sick minor wards. 

That portion of chapter 121 of the General Laws pertaining to the rate of board 
at the Hospital School was amended by chapter 344 of the Acts of 1924 to increase 
the board from $4 to $6 per week, which will materially increase the income for 
another year. 



40 P.D. 17. 

Of the 66 children who were discharged from the school department, 19 had 
completed the prescribed course of study in the grades and had been awarded the 
school diploma. Including those who were graduated, 28 were discharged to 
attend high schools or were regarded as no longer in need of special care and train- 
ing and left to continue their education elsewhere; 10 were taken home on visits 
and failed to return; 4 were physically unpromising; 7 were found to be mentally 
defective; 4 were removed against advice; 2 were discharged to leave the State; 
8 for whom further education was impossible were capable of self-support and 3 
children died. 

With an appropriation of $170,685 there was $161,280.99 expended for main- 
tenance. Of the amount expended $87,394.61 was for salaries, wages and labor; 
$73,886.38 for all other expenses. Weekly per capita cost of maintenance, com- 
puted on expense less sales and refunds from maintenance, $10,404. Total receipts 
from all sources other than the State treasury, $52,923.38. Net cost of mainte- 
nance to the Commonwealth, $108,357.61. Ratio of daily average number of per- 
sons employed to daily average number of inmates, 1 to 2.7. The Trustees esti- 
mate the sum of $181,208 for maintenance in 1925. 

SUPERVISION OF INSTITUTIONS. 

The addition, during the last few j-ears, of various new forms of institutional 
superv'ision from the State House, such as central personnel supervision, central 
engineering supers'ision, central printing superWsion, and central supervision of 
purchasing, makes it desirable to emphasize here the policy which has always been 
followed in this Department, that is, the pohcy of leaving the responsibihty for 
control of the institutions \\ith their own Boards of Trustees. Supervisory activi-